women

Showing 195 posts tagged women

Technology's Gender and Race Gaps Start With High School Opportunities

The key to diversifying the technology field appears to be to start tech education earlier with a push to turn women and minorities on to tech when they’re still teenagers, or even younger, rather than focus on getting them hired at tech startups or encouraging them to major in computer science in college.

“It’s already too late,” the founder of the tech entrepreneur boot camp Y Combinator, Paul Graham, said last month in a controversial interview. “What we should be doing is somehow changing the middle school computer science curriculum or something like that.”

The “start early” strategy is yet to start working at the moment: In high school, students undertaking advanced computer science work remain overpoweringly white and male. Only a small percentage of the high schoolers taking the Advanced Placement Computer Science exam are women, according to data from the College Board compiled by Georgia Tech’s Barbara Ericson. An even lower percentage of the test-takers are made up of Black and Latino students. In 2013, 18% of the students who took the exam were women, as shown by Ericson’s analysis of the data. 4% were African-American while 8% were Hispanic. In contrast, African-Americans make up 14% of the school-age population in the U.S., while Latinos make up 22%.

No Girls, Blacks, or Hispanics Take AP Computer Science Exam in Some States
Wait, what?

A new analysis of test-taking data finds that in Mississippi and Montana, no female, African American, or Hispanic students took the Advanced Placement exam in computer science. 
In fact, no African-American students took the exam in a total of 11 states, and no Hispanic students took it in eight states, according to state comparisons of College Board data compiled by Barbara Ericson, the director of computing outreach and a senior research scientist at Georgia Tech. 
High-res

No Girls, Blacks, or Hispanics Take AP Computer Science Exam in Some States

Wait, what?

A new analysis of test-taking data finds that in Mississippi and Montana, no female, African American, or Hispanic students took the Advanced Placement exam in computer science

In fact, no African-American students took the exam in a total of 11 states, and no Hispanic students took it in eight states, according to state comparisons of College Board data compiled by Barbara Ericson, the director of computing outreach and a senior research scientist at Georgia Tech.

halftheskymovement:

General Motors made history on Tuesday by announcing its first female CEO, Mary Barra. Barra, who ranks 35th on Forbes list of most powerful women, began her GM career in 1980 as an intern and gradually moved her way up the corporate ladder. “This is an exciting time at today’s GM. I’m honored to lead the best team in the business and to keep our momentum at full speed,” she said.
Read more via Forbes. 

halftheskymovement:

General Motors made history on Tuesday by announcing its first female CEO, Mary Barra. Barra, who ranks 35th on Forbes list of most powerful women, began her GM career in 1980 as an intern and gradually moved her way up the corporate ladder. “This is an exciting time at today’s GM. I’m honored to lead the best team in the business and to keep our momentum at full speed,” she said.

Read more via Forbes

Brain Connectivity Study Reveals Striking Differences Between Men and Women

A new brain connectivity study from Penn Medicine published today in the Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences found striking differences in the neural wiring of men and women that’s lending credence to some commonly-held beliefs about their behavior. 
In one of the largest studies looking at the “connectomes” of the sexes, Ragini Verma, PhD, an associate professor in the department of Radiology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and colleagues found greater neural connectivity from front to back and within one hemisphere in males, suggesting their brains are structured to facilitate connectivity between perception and coordinated action. In contrast, in females, the wiring goes between the left and right hemispheres, suggesting that they facilitate communication between the analytical and intuition.

For instance, on average, men are more likely better at learning and performing a single task at hand, like cycling or navigating directions, whereas women have superior memory and social cognition skills, making them more equipped for multitasking and creating solutions that work for a group. They have a mentalistic approach, so to speak.
High-res

Brain Connectivity Study Reveals Striking Differences Between Men and Women

A new brain connectivity study from Penn Medicine published today in the Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences found striking differences in the neural wiring of men and women that’s lending credence to some commonly-held beliefs about their behavior.

In one of the largest studies looking at the “connectomes” of the sexes, Ragini Verma, PhD, an associate professor in the department of Radiology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and colleagues found greater neural connectivity from front to back and within one hemisphere in males, suggesting their brains are structured to facilitate connectivity between perception and coordinated action. In contrast, in females, the wiring goes between the left and right hemispheres, suggesting that they facilitate communication between the analytical and intuition.

For instance, on average, men are more likely better at learning and performing a single task at hand, like cycling or navigating directions, whereas women have superior memory and social cognition skills, making them more equipped for multitasking and creating solutions that work for a group. They have a mentalistic approach, so to speak.

Giving Good Praise to Girls: What Messages Stick

As late as the 1960s many people perceived computer programming as a natural career choice for savvy young women. Even the trend-spotters at Cosmopolitan Magazine urged their fashionable female readership to consider careers in programming. In an article titled “The Computer Girls,” the magazine described the field as offering better job opportunities for women than many other professional careers. As computer scientist Dr. Grace Hopper told a reporter, programming was “just like planning a dinner. You have to plan ahead and schedule everything so that it’s ready when you need it…. Women are ‘naturals’ at computer programming.” James Adams, the director of education for the Association for Computing Machinery, agreed: “I don’t know of any other field, outside of teaching, where there’s as much opportunity for a woman.”

Computer Programming Used To Be Women’s Work  (via courtenaybird)

(via courtenaybird)