women

Showing 199 posts tagged women

thisistheverge:

Anita Sarkeesian shares the most radical thing you can do to support women online
Anyone looking to support women suffering from harassment online has a surprisingly simple place to start, says Anita Sarkeesian, founder of the web video series Feminist Frequency. “One of the most radical things you can do is to actually believe women when they talk about their experiences,” Sarkeesian told the audience today at XOXO Festival in Portland. It’s radical in part because of misinformation campaigns organized against high-profile women that accuse them of making up the threats against them — and it’s an issue that Sarkeesian has recent experience dealing with.
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thisistheverge:

Anita Sarkeesian shares the most radical thing you can do to support women online

Anyone looking to support women suffering from harassment online has a surprisingly simple place to start, says Anita Sarkeesian, founder of the web video series Feminist Frequency. “One of the most radical things you can do is to actually believe women when they talk about their experiences,” Sarkeesian told the audience today at XOXO Festival in Portland. It’s radical in part because of misinformation campaigns organized against high-profile women that accuse them of making up the threats against them — and it’s an issue that Sarkeesian has recent experience dealing with.

Do Girls Learn Differently Online?

Female students, for example, are poorly represented in science, technology, engineering, and math courses offered online, just as they are scarce in STEM classes conducted in physical classrooms. Demographic analyses of the students enrolled in much-hyped “massive open online courses” show the depth of the gender gap. “Circuits and Electronics,” the first MOOC developed by the online consortium of universities known as edX, had a student body that was 12 percent female, according to a study published in 2013. Another analysis, posted on the Coursera blog earlier this year, found that female enrollment in the company’s courses was lowest — around 20 percent — in subjects like computer science, engineering, and mathematics.
These dismally low numbers provide a reminder that “access” to education is more complicated than simply throwing open the digital doors to whoever wants to sign up. So how can we turn the mere availability of online instruction in STEM into true access for female students?

image via flickr:CC | flickingerbrad High-res

Do Girls Learn Differently Online?

Female students, for example, are poorly represented in science, technology, engineering, and math courses offered online, just as they are scarce in STEM classes conducted in physical classrooms. Demographic analyses of the students enrolled in much-hyped “massive open online courses” show the depth of the gender gap. “Circuits and Electronics,” the first MOOC developed by the online consortium of universities known as edX, had a student body that was 12 percent female, according to a study published in 2013. Another analysis, posted on the Coursera blog earlier this year, found that female enrollment in the company’s courses was lowest — around 20 percent — in subjects like computer science, engineering, and mathematics.

These dismally low numbers provide a reminder that “access” to education is more complicated than simply throwing open the digital doors to whoever wants to sign up. So how can we turn the mere availability of online instruction in STEM into true access for female students?

image via flickr:CC | flickingerbrad

Character Traits, Not Test Scores, Predict PhD Success of STEM Students

If schools were to choose graduate students for science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) programs based on each student’s character rather than standardized test scores, they would drastically improve the success of admitted students, and also boost the participation of women and minorities.

image via flickr:CC | TaylorB90 High-res

Character Traits, Not Test Scores, Predict PhD Success of STEM Students

If schools were to choose graduate students for science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) programs based on each student’s character rather than standardized test scores, they would drastically improve the success of admitted students, and also boost the participation of women and minorities.

image via flickr:CC | TaylorB90

femfreq releases:

In this episode we explore the Women as Background Decoration trope which is the subset of largely insignificant non-playable female characters whose sexuality or victimhood is exploited as a way to infuse edgy, gritty or racy flavoring into game worlds. These sexually objectified female bodies are designed to function as environmental texture while titillating presumed straight male players. Sometimes they’re created to be glorified furniture but they are frequently programmed as minimally interactive sex objects to be used and abused.

Full transcript, links and resources available at FeministFrequency.com

Computer science’s diversity gap starts early

In the U.S. in 2001, 27.6 percent of bachelor’s degrees awarded in computer science went to women, according to the National Science Foundation. By 2008, that number had dropped to a low of 17.7 percent. Though more recent numbers show a slight uptick to 18.2 percent in 2010, the field is still overwhelmingly male.
In 2011, women made up 47 percent of the workforce, but only 27 percent of those in computer jobs, according to the Census Bureau. Black and Hispanic workers are also scarce in the industry. Blacks accounted for 11 percent of workers overall, but only 7 percent in the computer science industry. Hispanics made up 15 percent of the workforce and only 6 percent of computer jobs.
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Computer science’s diversity gap starts early

In the U.S. in 2001, 27.6 percent of bachelor’s degrees awarded in computer science went to women, according to the National Science Foundation. By 2008, that number had dropped to a low of 17.7 percent. Though more recent numbers show a slight uptick to 18.2 percent in 2010, the field is still overwhelmingly male.

In 2011, women made up 47 percent of the workforce, but only 27 percent of those in computer jobs, according to the Census Bureau. Black and Hispanic workers are also scarce in the industry. Blacks accounted for 11 percent of workers overall, but only 7 percent in the computer science industry. Hispanics made up 15 percent of the workforce and only 6 percent of computer jobs.

ricktimus:

Neil deGrasse Tyson is not impressed with all your sexism.

Edit: This post made it to the Science tag! As a science aficionado, this of course makes me happy.

So lots of people have reblogged pointing out the irony that I didn’t even include the names of the scientists in my original post. This is mostly true. I did include their names on my post, but that was only in the tag section, and even then it was for my own reference purposes. Had I known this was going to be reblogged like mad and added to an educational category I, would have at least included links to their respective biographies and stuff, instead of only just my glib commentary.*

But that is what the edit feature is for, I suppose. SO HERE ARE SOME LINKS:

AND ALSO:

* Not that I will ever regret writing glib commentary about Neil deGrasse Tyson throwing some serious shade at the past.

Women should embrace the B’s in college to make more later

The college majors that tend to lead to the most profitable professions are also the stingiest about awarding A’s. Science departments grade, on a four-point scale, an average of 0.4 points lower than humanities departments, according to a 2010 analysis of national grading data by Stuart Rojstaczer and Christopher Healy. And two new research studies suggest that women might be abandoning these lucrative disciplines precisely because they’re terrified of getting B’s.
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Women should embrace the B’s in college to make more later

The college majors that tend to lead to the most profitable professions are also the stingiest about awarding A’s. Science departments grade, on a four-point scale, an average of 0.4 points lower than humanities departments, according to a 2010 analysis of national grading data by Stuart Rojstaczer and Christopher Healy. And two new research studies suggest that women might be abandoning these lucrative disciplines precisely because they’re terrified of getting B’s.

In new study, nearly a third of science and tech leaders think a woman can’t reach the top