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Showing 189 posts tagged women

Women should embrace the B’s in college to make more later

The college majors that tend to lead to the most profitable professions are also the stingiest about awarding A’s. Science departments grade, on a four-point scale, an average of 0.4 points lower than humanities departments, according to a 2010 analysis of national grading data by Stuart Rojstaczer and Christopher Healy. And two new research studies suggest that women might be abandoning these lucrative disciplines precisely because they’re terrified of getting B’s.
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Women should embrace the B’s in college to make more later

The college majors that tend to lead to the most profitable professions are also the stingiest about awarding A’s. Science departments grade, on a four-point scale, an average of 0.4 points lower than humanities departments, according to a 2010 analysis of national grading data by Stuart Rojstaczer and Christopher Healy. And two new research studies suggest that women might be abandoning these lucrative disciplines precisely because they’re terrified of getting B’s.

In new study, nearly a third of science and tech leaders think a woman can’t reach the top

Girls’ Education: The 2013 Report Card

Did you know that worldwide, more females than males are enrolled in higher education? In high-income countries the disparity is 82 percent versus 65 percent and is reversed in lower-income countries. Education and Skills 2.0: New Targets and Innovative Approaches, a new book from the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Education and Skills, has an entire chapter exploring disparities in girls’ education across seven key areas: literacy, primary enrollment, secondary enrollment, out-of-school tally, tertiary enrollment, complete rate and transitions, and repetition rate. 
Teach.com and the Global Agenda Council on Education and Skills have collaborated to create the following Infographic, Girls’ Education: The 2013 Report Card, to better illustrate the current state of girls’ education internationally. Click here to read the entire chapter on girls’ education.
High-res

Girls’ Education: The 2013 Report Card

Did you know that worldwide, more females than males are enrolled in higher education? In high-income countries the disparity is 82 percent versus 65 percent and is reversed in lower-income countries. Education and Skills 2.0: New Targets and Innovative Approaches, a new book from the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Education and Skills, has an entire chapter exploring disparities in girls’ education across seven key areas: literacy, primary enrollment, secondary enrollment, out-of-school tally, tertiary enrollment, complete rate and transitions, and repetition rate.

Teach.com and the Global Agenda Council on Education and Skills have collaborated to create the following Infographic, Girls’ Education: The 2013 Report Card, to better illustrate the current state of girls’ education internationally. Click here to read the entire chapter on girls’ education.

kenobi-wan-obi shares:

Representation in STEM: Black Women Making Their Mark in Space and Science

Today, there is an increased push for the American education system to improve their STEM programs as well as to get students to show interest in the fields. It is important to bring attention to some of the African-American females that have, and are still, paving the road for future scientists, astronauts or any STEM degree holders.

These women are just some of the many examples of African-American contributions to science. (Descriptions pertain to the women in the order they appear on the photoset, from up down, left right)

Mercedes Richards PH.D is a professor of astronomy and astrophysics at Pennsylvania State University. Originally from Jamaica, Dr. Richards received her Doctoral degree at the University of Toronto. In 2010 Dr. Richards received the Fulbright Award to conduct research at the Astronomical Institute in Slovakia. research focus is on binary stars; twin stars formed at the same time.

Willie Hobbs Moore PH.D is the first African-American woman to earn a PH.D in physics in 1972. She received it at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. Her thesis research involved important problems in vibrational analysis of macro molecules.

Beth Brown PH.D (1969-2008) was an Astrophysicist in the Sciences and Exploration Directorate at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. Born in Roanoke, VA, she grew up watching Star Trek and Star Wars and was fascinated with space. In 1998, Dr. Brown becoming the first African-American woman to earn a doctorate in Astronomy from the University of Michigan.

Chanda Prescod-Weinstein PH.D is currently a NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellow at the Observational Lab in Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt Maryland. Originally from Los Angeles California Dr. Prescod-Weinstein specializes in theoretical cosmology.

Dara Norman PH.D is a professor at the University of Washington. Dr. Norman grew up in the south side of Chicago Illinois. She went to MIT as an Undergraduate and worked at NASA Goddard in Maryland. Dr. Norman currently specializes in gravitational lensing, large scale structure and quasars (quasi-stellar objects). This year she was honored with the University’s Timeless Award for her contributions and accomplishments to astronomy. In 2009 she was invited to the Star Party at the White House.

Jeanette J. Epps PH.D from Syracuse NY is a NASA astronaut. She received her PH.D in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Marylan in 2000. Dr. Epps was selected in 2009 to be one of the 14 members of the 20th NASA astronaut class. She recently graduated from Astronaut Candidate Training.

Shirley Ann Jackson PH.D is the second African-American woman to earn a PH.D in physics and the first from MIT. In 2009 Dr. Jackson was appointed to serve on the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology. She is currently the President of the Renssalaer Polytechnic Institute.

Technology's Gender and Race Gaps Start With High School Opportunities

The key to diversifying the technology field appears to be to start tech education earlier with a push to turn women and minorities on to tech when they’re still teenagers, or even younger, rather than focus on getting them hired at tech startups or encouraging them to major in computer science in college.

“It’s already too late,” the founder of the tech entrepreneur boot camp Y Combinator, Paul Graham, said last month in a controversial interview. “What we should be doing is somehow changing the middle school computer science curriculum or something like that.”

The “start early” strategy is yet to start working at the moment: In high school, students undertaking advanced computer science work remain overpoweringly white and male. Only a small percentage of the high schoolers taking the Advanced Placement Computer Science exam are women, according to data from the College Board compiled by Georgia Tech’s Barbara Ericson. An even lower percentage of the test-takers are made up of Black and Latino students. In 2013, 18% of the students who took the exam were women, as shown by Ericson’s analysis of the data. 4% were African-American while 8% were Hispanic. In contrast, African-Americans make up 14% of the school-age population in the U.S., while Latinos make up 22%.

No Girls, Blacks, or Hispanics Take AP Computer Science Exam in Some States
Wait, what?

A new analysis of test-taking data finds that in Mississippi and Montana, no female, African American, or Hispanic students took the Advanced Placement exam in computer science. 
In fact, no African-American students took the exam in a total of 11 states, and no Hispanic students took it in eight states, according to state comparisons of College Board data compiled by Barbara Ericson, the director of computing outreach and a senior research scientist at Georgia Tech. 
High-res

No Girls, Blacks, or Hispanics Take AP Computer Science Exam in Some States

Wait, what?

A new analysis of test-taking data finds that in Mississippi and Montana, no female, African American, or Hispanic students took the Advanced Placement exam in computer science

In fact, no African-American students took the exam in a total of 11 states, and no Hispanic students took it in eight states, according to state comparisons of College Board data compiled by Barbara Ericson, the director of computing outreach and a senior research scientist at Georgia Tech.

halftheskymovement:

General Motors made history on Tuesday by announcing its first female CEO, Mary Barra. Barra, who ranks 35th on Forbes list of most powerful women, began her GM career in 1980 as an intern and gradually moved her way up the corporate ladder. “This is an exciting time at today’s GM. I’m honored to lead the best team in the business and to keep our momentum at full speed,” she said.
Read more via Forbes. 

halftheskymovement:

General Motors made history on Tuesday by announcing its first female CEO, Mary Barra. Barra, who ranks 35th on Forbes list of most powerful women, began her GM career in 1980 as an intern and gradually moved her way up the corporate ladder. “This is an exciting time at today’s GM. I’m honored to lead the best team in the business and to keep our momentum at full speed,” she said.

Read more via Forbes