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Showing 294 posts tagged videos

8 Crash Courses to Help High School Students Review the School Year

If your school is not yet out for the summer, you’re probably in the home stretch. This is the time of year when we spend a lot of time reviewing everything that we did during the school year. While your students should definitely review their notes, they might want to supplement those notes with some online video content. Hank and John Green’s Crash Course is an excellent place for high school students to turn to when they need some review videos.

From Passive Viewing to Active Learning

There’s a big difference between watching a video and learning something from it. Videos are great for presenting visual information and emotional appeals, but not particularly effective at diving below the surface of non-visual theoretical or abstract topics or for driving critical thinking. What’s more, any video presented in class must compete for attention and memory with the five-plus hours the typical student spends outside of class watching television programs, movies, and other onscreen entertainment. (Nielsen, 2013) 
To help increase the educational effectiveness of an online course video, consider applying one or more of the following active learning strategies…

image via flickr:CC | Poetprince High-res

From Passive Viewing to Active Learning

There’s a big difference between watching a video and learning something from it. Videos are great for presenting visual information and emotional appeals, but not particularly effective at diving below the surface of non-visual theoretical or abstract topics or for driving critical thinking. What’s more, any video presented in class must compete for attention and memory with the five-plus hours the typical student spends outside of class watching television programs, movies, and other onscreen entertainment. (Nielsen, 2013)

To help increase the educational effectiveness of an online course video, consider applying one or more of the following active learning strategies

image via flickr:CC | Poetprince

TED-Ed

With this week’s launch of TED-Ed, the organization that’s spent the past six years providing free YouTube access to “ideas worth spreading’ is merging short lessons from excellent teachers with high-quality video production and animation in order to engage a new generation of learners.

Each TED-Ed video, which will also be hosted on YouTube, clocks in at 10 minutes or less, enabling educators to communicate a powerful idea to students in a short, easily digestible format.

Deciding what to do after high school or college can be a daunting task for students. Career Thoughts is a site that aims to help students make informed career decisions. On Career Thoughts students can find career profiles that outline what a person in a particular career field actually does, the education requirements for that field, salary ranges, and employment prospects. The Career Thoughts YouTube channel provides even more information through video profiles of careers.

Six Vintage-Inspired Animations on Critical Thinking

Animator James Hutson has created six fantastic two-minute animations on various aspects of critical thinking, aimed at kids ages 8 to 10 but also designed to resonate with grown-ups. Inspired by the animation style of the 1950s, most recognizably Saul Bass, the films are designed to promote a set of educational resources on critical thinking by TechNYou, an emerging technologies public information project funded by the Australian government.

The animations — which are part Minute Physics, part The Dot and the Line, part 60-Second Adventures in Thought — are released under a Creative Commons license and cover the basics of logic and the scientific method, as well as specific psychological pitfalls like confirmation bias and Gambler’s Fallacy.

Lecture Fail?

PowerPoint is boring. Student attention spans are short. Today  many facts pop up with a simple Google search. And plenty of free  lectures by the world’s greatest professors can be found on YouTube. 
If you’re a current college student, fire up your laptop’s Web  cam and record a short “classroom confessional,” letting us know whether  your professor’s lectures are boring, inspiring, or something in  between. Just post your video to YouTube or other video-sharing site,  and e-mail a link to jeff.young@chronicle.com.

photo via flickr:CC|turkletom

Lecture Fail?

PowerPoint is boring. Student attention spans are short. Today many facts pop up with a simple Google search. And plenty of free lectures by the world’s greatest professors can be found on YouTube.

If you’re a current college student, fire up your laptop’s Web cam and record a short “classroom confessional,” letting us know whether your professor’s lectures are boring, inspiring, or something in between. Just post your video to YouTube or other video-sharing site, and e-mail a link to jeff.young@chronicle.com.

photo via flickr:CC|turkletom

Make your case to your school’s IT/administration for YouTube with this video. Now your school can unlock and grant you access to content on YouTubeEDU.

YouTube for Schools lets schools access free educational YouTube videos while limiting access to other YouTube content. Students can learn from more than 400,000 educational videos, from well-known organizations like Stanford, PBS and TED, and from up-and-coming YouTube partners with millions of views, like Khan Academy, Steve Spangler Science and numberphile. Schools can also customize their YouTube for Schools experience, adding videos that are only viewable within their school network.