tech

Showing 1040 posts tagged tech

futurescope:

Fraunhofer IIS presents world’s first emotion detection app on Google Glass

The Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits IIS has adapted its SHORE™ real-time face detection and analysis software to work with Google Glass:

Fraunhofer IIS presents a real-time* face tracker on Google Glass that can read people’s emotions. At the same time it also estimates age and gender of persons in front of Glass’ camera. Privacy is important: everything happens inside Glass – no image leaves the device. Detection is anonymous – no facial recognition. The app is based on SHORE, Fraunhofer’s proprietary software library for real-time facial detection and analysis. Emotion analysis on wearable devices has endless applications. E.g. it can be used in aids for people suffering from ASD (autism spectrum disorders) or for visually impaired.

(* low frame rate shown in the video is due to a bottleneck in the technique used to mirror Glass’ display on a computer monitor.)

[read more]

Turnitin And The Debate Over Anti-Plagiarism Software

Plenty of plagiarism is intentional (though it’s hard to know how much cheating is really happening). Many of the matches Turnitin finds come from paper mills, cheat sites and its own paper database. And, as the technology improves, some students intent on cheating will find ways to outsmart it. But with the company adding 300,000 student papers a day, intentional plagiarism is riskier than ever.
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Turnitin And The Debate Over Anti-Plagiarism Software

Plenty of plagiarism is intentional (though it’s hard to know how much cheating is really happening). Many of the matches Turnitin finds come from paper mills, cheat sites and its own paper database. And, as the technology improves, some students intent on cheating will find ways to outsmart it. But with the company adding 300,000 student papers a day, intentional plagiarism is riskier than ever.

Coping Strategies for Cell Phone Loss Anxiety

For many, a day without a smartphone a day without sunshine. The issue becomes much more complicated if we believe we have lost our phones compounding anxiety and stress.
A new study outlines potential coping mechanisms. Surprisingly, few smart-phone users have a plan to minimize repercussions associated with loss of the device.
Experts contend that the smartphone has changed our behavior — sometimes for the better as we are now able to connect and engage with many more people than ever before — sometimes for the worse in that we may have become over-reliant on the device.

image via flickr:CC | dmott9 High-res

Coping Strategies for Cell Phone Loss Anxiety

For many, a day without a smartphone a day without sunshine. The issue becomes much more complicated if we believe we have lost our phones compounding anxiety and stress.

A new study outlines potential coping mechanisms. Surprisingly, few smart-phone users have a plan to minimize repercussions associated with loss of the device.

Experts contend that the smartphone has changed our behavior — sometimes for the better as we are now able to connect and engage with many more people than ever before — sometimes for the worse in that we may have become over-reliant on the device.

image via flickr:CC | dmott9

In our digital world, are young people losing the ability to read emotions?

Scientists report that sixth-graders who went five days without even glancing at a smartphone, television or other screen did substantially better at reading emotions than sixth-graders from the same school who, as usual, spent hours each day looking at their smartphones and other screens.

image via flickr:CC | danielito311 High-res

In our digital world, are young people losing the ability to read emotions?

Scientists report that sixth-graders who went five days without even glancing at a smartphone, television or other screen did substantially better at reading emotions than sixth-graders from the same school who, as usual, spent hours each day looking at their smartphones and other screens.

image via flickr:CC | danielito311

The future of textbooks

Since 2012, we have been gathering data on how US college students acquire course materials. Our annual survey of more than 1,000 students shows steady growth in the textbook-rental market. In our 2012 survey, 10 percent of all assigned textbooks were rented. Some 30 percent of textbooks were purchased new, and about 45 percent were bought used. (The remaining 15 percent includes basic e-book sales and books that were shared, borrowed, or pirated.) One year later, the proportion of rented textbooks had doubled to about 20 percent, compared with 30 percent bought new and 40 percent bought used. And in our 2014 survey, the rental share was 25 percent, compared with 30 percent for new and 35 percent for used (Exhibit 1, above).
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The future of textbooks

Since 2012, we have been gathering data on how US college students acquire course materials. Our annual survey of more than 1,000 students shows steady growth in the textbook-rental market. In our 2012 survey, 10 percent of all assigned textbooks were rented. Some 30 percent of textbooks were purchased new, and about 45 percent were bought used. (The remaining 15 percent includes basic e-book sales and books that were shared, borrowed, or pirated.) One year later, the proportion of rented textbooks had doubled to about 20 percent, compared with 30 percent bought new and 40 percent bought used. And in our 2014 survey, the rental share was 25 percent, compared with 30 percent for new and 35 percent for used (Exhibit 1, above).

Does Tech Hold Educators Back?

Reading Literature on Screen: A Price for Convenience?

Do people read as well on screens as they do on paper? Scientists aren’t quite sure. While the type of E Ink used in the latest generation of Kindles and other tablets has been shown to be as or even more legible than printed text, other studies have indicated that — in terms of reading comprehension — the medium doesn’t much matter.
But a forthcoming paper by researchers in France and Norway suggests that there may be some cognitive drawbacks to reading even short works of literature on a screen.
High-res

Reading Literature on Screen: A Price for Convenience?

Do people read as well on screens as they do on paper? Scientists aren’t quite sure. While the type of E Ink used in the latest generation of Kindles and other tablets has been shown to be as or even more legible than printed text, other studies have indicated that — in terms of reading comprehension — the medium doesn’t much matter.

But a forthcoming paper by researchers in France and Norway suggests that there may be some cognitive drawbacks to reading even short works of literature on a screen.

Rice Engineering Team Delivers Robot Arm to Teen

The bioengineering students who won last April’s George R. Brown School of Engineering Design Showcase and Competition for their R-ARM, a robotic device for Faught that fits his motorized chair, had the eager team try a nearly finished version Sept. 20 at Shriner’s Hospital for Children in Houston.The arm will allow Faught, who lives with osteogenesis imperfecta, a genetic condition that makes his bones especially brittle, to perform tasks most people take for granted.

Rice Engineering Team Delivers Robot Arm to Teen

The bioengineering students who won last April’s George R. Brown School of Engineering Design Showcase and Competition for their R-ARM, a robotic device for Faught that fits his motorized chair, had the eager team try a nearly finished version Sept. 20 at Shriner’s Hospital for Children in Houston.

The arm will allow Faught, who lives with osteogenesis imperfecta, a genetic condition that makes his bones especially brittle, to perform tasks most people take for granted.