study

Showing 235 posts tagged study

Study: College students aren’t embracing tablets like experts expected

College students are not embracing tablets as many experts had expected when the devices were introduced a few years ago, says a new report from Ball State University.
About 29 percent of students report owning a tablet in 2014, a slight decline since 2012, said Michael Hanley, an advertising professor and director of Ball State’s Institute for Mobile Media Research. He has conducted surveys on the use of mobile devices by students since 2004.

image via flickr:CC | Merrill College of Journalism Press Releases

Study: College students aren’t embracing tablets like experts expected

College students are not embracing tablets as many experts had expected when the devices were introduced a few years ago, says a new report from Ball State University.

About 29 percent of students report owning a tablet in 2014, a slight decline since 2012, said Michael Hanley, an advertising professor and director of Ball State’s Institute for Mobile Media Research. He has conducted surveys on the use of mobile devices by students since 2004.

image via flickr:CC | Merrill College of Journalism Press Releases

Education May Help Insulate The Brain Against Traumatic Injury

A little education goes a long way toward ensuring you’ll recover from a serious traumatic brain injury. In fact, people with lots of education are seven times more likely than high school dropouts to have no measurable disability a year later.
"It’s a very dramatic difference," says , an epidemiologist at Johns Hopkins and the lead author of a new study. The finding suggests that people with more education have brains that are better able to “find ways around the damage” caused by an injury, he says.

image via flickr:CC | jetheriot High-res

Education May Help Insulate The Brain Against Traumatic Injury

A little education goes a long way toward ensuring you’ll recover from a serious traumatic brain injury. In fact, people with lots of education are seven times more likely than high school dropouts to have no measurable disability a year later.

"It’s a very dramatic difference," says , an epidemiologist at Johns Hopkins and the lead author of a new study. The finding suggests that people with more education have brains that are better able to “find ways around the damage” caused by an injury, he says.

image via flickr:CC | jetheriot

Study: 2 In 5 Americans Earning Degrees After High School

America may have a shot at rejoining the world’s most educated nations by 2025, according to a report released Monday by the Lumina Foundation. 
The Indianapolis-based foundation’s annual report finds some encouraging data to counter the familiar story of a nation that is famed for its colleges and universities but trails many other countries when it comes to the percentage of people with a degree beyond high school.
High-res

Study: 2 In 5 Americans Earning Degrees After High School

America may have a shot at rejoining the world’s most educated nations by 2025, according to a report released Monday by the Lumina Foundation.

The Indianapolis-based foundation’s annual report finds some encouraging data to counter the familiar story of a nation that is famed for its colleges and universities but trails many other countries when it comes to the percentage of people with a degree beyond high school.

Relationship Problems Can Damage Teen Girls’ Mental Health

Poverty ‘ages’ genes of young children, study shows

aljazeeraamerica:

The stress of growing up in a poor and unstable household affects children as young as 9 years old on a genetic level, shortening a portion of their chromosomes that scientists say is a key indicator of aging and illness, according to a study released Monday. The researchers say their findings are the first that document this type of genetic change among minority children, and make a strong case for the importance of early-childhood intervention in vulnerable communities.

Researchers examined the DNA of a small group of 9-year-old African-American boys who had experienced chronic stress as a result of growing up in families with poor socioeconomic status. They found that the boys’ telomeres were shorter than those of boys the same age and ethnicity who came from advantaged families.

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Reading is Not Formulaic: Why Equations Can’t Be Sole Determinants of Student Texts

There’s more to reading than simple properties of words and sentences. There’s building meaning across sentences, and connecting meaning of whole paragraphs into arguments, and into themes. Readability formulas represent a gamble. The gamble is that the word- and sentence-level metrics will be highly correlated with the other, more important characteristics. 
It’s not a crazy gamble, but a new study (Begeny & Greene, 2014) offers discouraging data to those who have been banking on it.

image via flickr:CC | Stitch High-res

Reading is Not Formulaic: Why Equations Can’t Be Sole Determinants of Student Texts

There’s more to reading than simple properties of words and sentences. There’s building meaning across sentences, and connecting meaning of whole paragraphs into arguments, and into themes. Readability formulas represent a gamble. The gamble is that the word- and sentence-level metrics will be highly correlated with the other, more important characteristics.

It’s not a crazy gamble, but a new study (Begeny & Greene, 2014) offers discouraging data to those who have been banking on it.

image via flickr:CC | Stitch

For Reformers: An Important Paper on Worker Compensation & Incentives

Don't Help Your Kids With Their Homework

Study Links Teacher ‘Grit’ with Effectiveness, Retention

In recent years, we’ve heard a lot about gritty students.  Now grit researchers are turning their attention to teachers. In a study published in the current issue of the peer-reviewed journal Teachers College Record, University of Pennsylvania researchers Claire Robertson-Kraft and Angela Duckworth found that, for novice teachers in high-poverty school districts, higher levels of  ”perseverance and passion for long-term goals”  (aka “grit”)  were associated with higher rates of effectiveness and retention.

image via flickr:CC | ChodHound High-res

Study Links Teacher ‘Grit’ with Effectiveness, Retention

In recent years, we’ve heard a lot about gritty students.  Now grit researchers are turning their attention to teachers. In a study published in the current issue of the peer-reviewed journal Teachers College Record, University of Pennsylvania researchers Claire Robertson-Kraft and Angela Duckworth found that, for novice teachers in high-poverty school districts, higher levels of  ”perseverance and passion for long-term goals”  (aka “grit”)  were associated with higher rates of effectiveness and retention.

image via flickr:CC | ChodHound

Are you smarter than a 5-year-old? Preschoolers can do algebra

Attention Training Helps Kids Avoid Obesity