study

Showing 260 posts tagged study

Are College Students Really Obsessed With Technology?

Every year, the re:fuel agency College Explorer does a huge study among all types of students in the 18-24 and 25-34 year old age groups. You can see the full report by clicking here, but the key findings have been summed up in the handy infographic below that they’ve made to accompany the study. Keep reading and you’ll have a pretty good idea of what college students are looking like these days – in so many different aspects!
High-res

Are College Students Really Obsessed With Technology?

Every year, the re:fuel agency College Explorer does a huge study among all types of students in the 18-24 and 25-34 year old age groups. You can see the full report by clicking here, but the key findings have been summed up in the handy infographic below that they’ve made to accompany the study. Keep reading and you’ll have a pretty good idea of what college students are looking like these days – in so many different aspects!

Study: For poor teens, better schools equal less risky behavior

Low-income teenagers are significantly less likely to engage in certain risky health behaviors, such as gang membership and binge drinking, when they attend high-performing schools, according to a new study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics. 
The newest evidence in a growing national discussion about the connections between health and education, the University of California, Los Angeles study compared low-income students in lottery-based, high-performing public charter schools with other teens who were not accepted into those schools. Although demographically equivalent, students in the first group were much less likely to become pregnant, use drugs other than marijuana, carry a weapon to school, or engage in any number of other behaviors categorized by the researchers as “very risky.”  

image via flickr:CC | myDefinition High-res

Study: For poor teens, better schools equal less risky behavior

Low-income teenagers are significantly less likely to engage in certain risky health behaviors, such as gang membership and binge drinking, when they attend high-performing schools, according to a new study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics. 

The newest evidence in a growing national discussion about the connections between health and education, the University of California, Los Angeles study compared low-income students in lottery-based, high-performing public charter schools with other teens who were not accepted into those schools. Although demographically equivalent, students in the first group were much less likely to become pregnant, use drugs other than marijuana, carry a weapon to school, or engage in any number of other behaviors categorized by the researchers as “very risky.” 

image via flickr:CC | myDefinition

For Most Kids, Nice Finishes Last

A new study holds up a mirror to America’s parents. A surveyed 10,000 middle and high school students in 33 different schools around the nation about what they thought their folks cared about most: that they achieve at a high level, that they are happy (defined as “feeling good most of the time”), or that they care for others. Almost 80 percent of youth picked high achievement or happiness as their top choice, while about 20 percent selected caring for others. The survey also shows that about 80 percent of kids themselves rank achievement or happiness as most important, paralleling what they believe their parents value most.

For Most Kids, Nice Finishes Last

A new study holds up a mirror to America’s parents. A surveyed 10,000 middle and high school students in 33 different schools around the nation about what they thought their folks cared about most: that they achieve at a high level, that they are happy (defined as “feeling good most of the time”), or that they care for others. Almost 80 percent of youth picked high achievement or happiness as their top choice, while about 20 percent selected caring for others. The survey also shows that about 80 percent of kids themselves rank achievement or happiness as most important, paralleling what they believe their parents value most.

European Students’ Use of ‘Smart Drugs’ Is Said to Rise

Under heavy pressure to excel, significant numbers of European university students are using cognitive enhancers, so-called smart drugs, to keep up with academic demands, recent studies show. 
A lack of long-term research makes it difficult to gauge whether the use of such stimulants, with the aim of improving concentration and memory, is on the rise — and if so, to what degree — says Boris Quednow, an assistant professor and psychologist at the Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Zurich.
Substances used, the study found, included alcohol, the most commonly reported, by 5.6 percent of respondents; methylphenidate — sold under several trade names, including Ritalin — reported by 4.1 percent; sedatives (2.7 percent); beta blockers (1.2 percent); cannabis (2.5 percent); amphetamines (0.4 percent), and cocaine (0.2 percent).

image via flickr:CC | ADHD CENTER High-res

European Students’ Use of ‘Smart Drugs’ Is Said to Rise

Under heavy pressure to excel, significant numbers of European university students are using cognitive enhancers, so-called smart drugs, to keep up with academic demands, recent studies show.

A lack of long-term research makes it difficult to gauge whether the use of such stimulants, with the aim of improving concentration and memory, is on the rise — and if so, to what degree — says Boris Quednow, an assistant professor and psychologist at the Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Zurich.

Substances used, the study found, included alcohol, the most commonly reported, by 5.6 percent of respondents; methylphenidate — sold under several trade names, including Ritalin — reported by 4.1 percent; sedatives (2.7 percent); beta blockers (1.2 percent); cannabis (2.5 percent); amphetamines (0.4 percent), and cocaine (0.2 percent).

image via flickr:CC | ADHD CENTER

Repeated Practice May Not Make You an Expert

With apologies to Malcolm Gladwell, new research finds that deliberate practice may not have nearly as much influence in building expertise as once thought.
In the new study, psychological scientist Brooke Macnamara, Ph.D., of Princeton University, and colleagues offer a dissenting view, suggesting that the amount of practice accumulated over time does not seem to play a huge role in accounting for individual differences in skill or performance.

gif via erdal inci

Repeated Practice May Not Make You an Expert

With apologies to Malcolm Gladwell, new research finds that deliberate practice may not have nearly as much influence in building expertise as once thought.

In the new study, psychological scientist Brooke Macnamara, Ph.D., of Princeton University, and colleagues offer a dissenting view, suggesting that the amount of practice accumulated over time does not seem to play a huge role in accounting for individual differences in skill or performance.

gif via erdal inci

Reading in The Mobile Era 

Drawing on the analysis of over 4,000 surveys collected in seven developing countries and corresponding qualitative interviews, this report paints the most detailed picture to date of who reads books and stories on mobile devices and why.
The findings illuminate, for the first time, the habits, beliefs and profiles of mobile readers. This information points to strategies to expand mobile reading and, by extension, the educational, social and economic benefits associated with increased reading.
High-res

Reading in The Mobile Era

Drawing on the analysis of over 4,000 surveys collected in seven developing countries and corresponding qualitative interviews, this report paints the most detailed picture to date of who reads books and stories on mobile devices and why.

The findings illuminate, for the first time, the habits, beliefs and profiles of mobile readers. This information points to strategies to expand mobile reading and, by extension, the educational, social and economic benefits associated with increased reading.

Follow Why Free Play Is the Best Summer School

Unscheduled, unsupervised, playtime is one of the most valuable educational opportunities we give our children. It is fertile ground; the place where children strengthen social bonds, build emotional maturity, develop cognitive skills, and shore up their physical health. The value of free play,  daydreaming, risk-taking, and independent discovery have been much in the news this year, and a new study by psychologists at the University of Colorado reveals just how important these activities are in the development of children’s executive functioning.

image via flickr:CC | Pensiero High-res

Follow Why Free Play Is the Best Summer School

Unscheduled, unsupervised, playtime is one of the most valuable educational opportunities we give our children. It is fertile ground; the place where children strengthen social bonds, build emotional maturity, develop cognitive skills, and shore up their physical health. The value of free play,  daydreaming, risk-taking, and independent discovery have been much in the news this year, and a new study by psychologists at the University of Colorado reveals just how important these activities are in the development of children’s executive functioning.

image via flickr:CC | Pensiero

Early life stress can leave lasting impacts on the brain

For children, stress can go a long way. A little bit provides a platform for learning, adapting and coping. But a lot of it — chronic, toxic stress like poverty, neglect and physical abuse — can have lasting negative impacts. A team of researchers recently showed these kinds of stressors, experienced in early life, might be changing the parts of developing children’s brains responsible for learning, memory and the processing of stress and emotion.

image via flickr:CC | keirstenmarie High-res

Early life stress can leave lasting impacts on the brain

For children, stress can go a long way. A little bit provides a platform for learning, adapting and coping. But a lot of it — chronic, toxic stress like poverty, neglect and physical abuse — can have lasting negative impacts. A team of researchers recently showed these kinds of stressors, experienced in early life, might be changing the parts of developing children’s brains responsible for learning, memory and the processing of stress and emotion.

image via flickr:CC | keirstenmarie

Simple, Old-Fashioned Game Improves Classroom Behavior, Studies Say
image via flickr:CC | mrobisonabc

"The [Good Behavior Game] allows teachers to engage in several behavior management strategies including acknowledging appropriate behavior, teaching classroom rules, providing feedback about inappropriate behavior, verbal praise, and providing rewards as reinforcement," writes Andrea Flower, an assistant professor of education at the University of Texas at Austin and her co-authors in an article published June 12th by the Review of Educational Research, a peer-refereed journal. “Thus, the [Good Behavior Game] is a potentially effective classroom management tool for teacher use.”
 But does it really work repeatedly, in multiple school settings, over time?
High-res

Simple, Old-Fashioned Game Improves Classroom Behavior, Studies Say

image via flickr:CC | mrobisonabc

"The [Good Behavior Game] allows teachers to engage in several behavior management strategies including acknowledging appropriate behavior, teaching classroom rules, providing feedback about inappropriate behavior, verbal praise, and providing rewards as reinforcement," writes Andrea Flower, an assistant professor of education at the University of Texas at Austin and her co-authors in an article published June 12th by the Review of Educational Research, a peer-refereed journal. “Thus, the [Good Behavior Game] is a potentially effective classroom management tool for teacher use.”

But does it really work repeatedly, in multiple school settings, over time?