study

Showing 266 posts tagged study

Telecommuting Can Aid Employee Moral without Productivity Loss

Are College Students Really Obsessed With Technology?

Every year, the re:fuel agency College Explorer does a huge study among all types of students in the 18-24 and 25-34 year old age groups. You can see the full report by clicking here, but the key findings have been summed up in the handy infographic below that they’ve made to accompany the study. Keep reading and you’ll have a pretty good idea of what college students are looking like these days – in so many different aspects!
High-res

Are College Students Really Obsessed With Technology?

Every year, the re:fuel agency College Explorer does a huge study among all types of students in the 18-24 and 25-34 year old age groups. You can see the full report by clicking here, but the key findings have been summed up in the handy infographic below that they’ve made to accompany the study. Keep reading and you’ll have a pretty good idea of what college students are looking like these days – in so many different aspects!

Study: For poor teens, better schools equal less risky behavior

Low-income teenagers are significantly less likely to engage in certain risky health behaviors, such as gang membership and binge drinking, when they attend high-performing schools, according to a new study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics. 
The newest evidence in a growing national discussion about the connections between health and education, the University of California, Los Angeles study compared low-income students in lottery-based, high-performing public charter schools with other teens who were not accepted into those schools. Although demographically equivalent, students in the first group were much less likely to become pregnant, use drugs other than marijuana, carry a weapon to school, or engage in any number of other behaviors categorized by the researchers as “very risky.”  

image via flickr:CC | myDefinition High-res

Study: For poor teens, better schools equal less risky behavior

Low-income teenagers are significantly less likely to engage in certain risky health behaviors, such as gang membership and binge drinking, when they attend high-performing schools, according to a new study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics. 

The newest evidence in a growing national discussion about the connections between health and education, the University of California, Los Angeles study compared low-income students in lottery-based, high-performing public charter schools with other teens who were not accepted into those schools. Although demographically equivalent, students in the first group were much less likely to become pregnant, use drugs other than marijuana, carry a weapon to school, or engage in any number of other behaviors categorized by the researchers as “very risky.” 

image via flickr:CC | myDefinition

For Most Kids, Nice Finishes Last

A new study holds up a mirror to America’s parents. A surveyed 10,000 middle and high school students in 33 different schools around the nation about what they thought their folks cared about most: that they achieve at a high level, that they are happy (defined as “feeling good most of the time”), or that they care for others. Almost 80 percent of youth picked high achievement or happiness as their top choice, while about 20 percent selected caring for others. The survey also shows that about 80 percent of kids themselves rank achievement or happiness as most important, paralleling what they believe their parents value most.

For Most Kids, Nice Finishes Last

A new study holds up a mirror to America’s parents. A surveyed 10,000 middle and high school students in 33 different schools around the nation about what they thought their folks cared about most: that they achieve at a high level, that they are happy (defined as “feeling good most of the time”), or that they care for others. Almost 80 percent of youth picked high achievement or happiness as their top choice, while about 20 percent selected caring for others. The survey also shows that about 80 percent of kids themselves rank achievement or happiness as most important, paralleling what they believe their parents value most.

European Students’ Use of ‘Smart Drugs’ Is Said to Rise

Under heavy pressure to excel, significant numbers of European university students are using cognitive enhancers, so-called smart drugs, to keep up with academic demands, recent studies show. 
A lack of long-term research makes it difficult to gauge whether the use of such stimulants, with the aim of improving concentration and memory, is on the rise — and if so, to what degree — says Boris Quednow, an assistant professor and psychologist at the Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Zurich.
Substances used, the study found, included alcohol, the most commonly reported, by 5.6 percent of respondents; methylphenidate — sold under several trade names, including Ritalin — reported by 4.1 percent; sedatives (2.7 percent); beta blockers (1.2 percent); cannabis (2.5 percent); amphetamines (0.4 percent), and cocaine (0.2 percent).

image via flickr:CC | ADHD CENTER High-res

European Students’ Use of ‘Smart Drugs’ Is Said to Rise

Under heavy pressure to excel, significant numbers of European university students are using cognitive enhancers, so-called smart drugs, to keep up with academic demands, recent studies show.

A lack of long-term research makes it difficult to gauge whether the use of such stimulants, with the aim of improving concentration and memory, is on the rise — and if so, to what degree — says Boris Quednow, an assistant professor and psychologist at the Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Zurich.

Substances used, the study found, included alcohol, the most commonly reported, by 5.6 percent of respondents; methylphenidate — sold under several trade names, including Ritalin — reported by 4.1 percent; sedatives (2.7 percent); beta blockers (1.2 percent); cannabis (2.5 percent); amphetamines (0.4 percent), and cocaine (0.2 percent).

image via flickr:CC | ADHD CENTER

Repeated Practice May Not Make You an Expert

With apologies to Malcolm Gladwell, new research finds that deliberate practice may not have nearly as much influence in building expertise as once thought.
In the new study, psychological scientist Brooke Macnamara, Ph.D., of Princeton University, and colleagues offer a dissenting view, suggesting that the amount of practice accumulated over time does not seem to play a huge role in accounting for individual differences in skill or performance.

gif via erdal inci

Repeated Practice May Not Make You an Expert

With apologies to Malcolm Gladwell, new research finds that deliberate practice may not have nearly as much influence in building expertise as once thought.

In the new study, psychological scientist Brooke Macnamara, Ph.D., of Princeton University, and colleagues offer a dissenting view, suggesting that the amount of practice accumulated over time does not seem to play a huge role in accounting for individual differences in skill or performance.

gif via erdal inci