students

Showing 1000 posts tagged students

Examining Knowledge Beliefs to Motivate Student Learning

Kindergartners’ Skills at School Entry: An Analysis of the ECLS-K 

Although most American children receive some pre-K child care and education, kindergarten still represents many children’s first exposure to formal schooling. Kindergarten supports children’s cognitive, social, and emotional skills, leading to rapid gains in knowledge during this first year of education. 
However, not all children enter kindergarten equally prepared to meet the challenges ahead of them. Researchers have found stark differences in kindergartners’ language, literacy, and math abilities as well as their social skills and behavioral approaches to learning. These areas are interdependent, and children who start kindergarten behind in math, reading, and attention-related skills risk being unable to catch up to their peers later on.
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Kindergartners’ Skills at School Entry: An Analysis of the ECLS-K

Although most American children receive some pre-K child care and education, kindergarten still represents many children’s first exposure to formal schooling. Kindergarten supports children’s cognitive, social, and emotional skills, leading to rapid gains in knowledge during this first year of education.

However, not all children enter kindergarten equally prepared to meet the challenges ahead of them. Researchers have found stark differences in kindergartners’ language, literacy, and math abilities as well as their social skills and behavioral approaches to learning. These areas are interdependent, and children who start kindergarten behind in math, reading, and attention-related skills risk being unable to catch up to their peers later on.

CBT in Grade School Can Lower Kids’ Anxiety

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) has been shown to greatly reduce anxiety levels in schoolchildren ages nine to 10 years old, according to new research from Oxford University. Researchers believe that this therapy would benefit all children, regardless of their anxiety levels.
During CBT, students learned how to identify and handle their emotions and replace their anxious thoughts with more constructive thought patterns. They also developed their problem-solving skills so they could better deal with anxiety-provoking situations.

image via flickr:CC | Holtsman High-res

CBT in Grade School Can Lower Kids’ Anxiety

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) has been shown to greatly reduce anxiety levels in schoolchildren ages nine to 10 years old, according to new research from Oxford University. Researchers believe that this therapy would benefit all children, regardless of their anxiety levels.

During CBT, students learned how to identify and handle their emotions and replace their anxious thoughts with more constructive thought patterns. They also developed their problem-solving skills so they could better deal with anxiety-provoking situations.

image via flickr:CC | Holtsman

Motivation: Reflecting On What To Do When It’s Not There

That’s Lesson Number One that I wish I knew as a student: Sometimes you aren’t going to be motivated but do it anyway — such a simple lesson that has propelled me into action. Maybe motivation is overrated. Maybe in order to be successful we don’t really need a whole lot of it.
 Really it’s just a shift in perspective…

image via flickr:CC | bastique High-res

Motivation: Reflecting On What To Do When It’s Not There

That’s Lesson Number One that I wish I knew as a student: Sometimes you aren’t going to be motivated but do it anyway — such a simple lesson that has propelled me into action. Maybe motivation is overrated. Maybe in order to be successful we don’t really need a whole lot of it.

Really it’s just a shift in perspective

image via flickr:CC | bastique

Data gives power to teachers. If we know my child is confusing rates and ratios, a teacher can correct that one misunderstanding that is preventing progress. If we know in great detail where misconceptions are occurring, as they occur, teaching can include many such tiny just-in-time interventions for each unique student that allows that child to learn more quickly and deeply.

Please Share my Children’s Data

A Starting Point for Ensuring Student Online Privacy

For Most Kids, Nice Finishes Last

A new study holds up a mirror to America’s parents. A surveyed 10,000 middle and high school students in 33 different schools around the nation about what they thought their folks cared about most: that they achieve at a high level, that they are happy (defined as “feeling good most of the time”), or that they care for others. Almost 80 percent of youth picked high achievement or happiness as their top choice, while about 20 percent selected caring for others. The survey also shows that about 80 percent of kids themselves rank achievement or happiness as most important, paralleling what they believe their parents value most.

For Most Kids, Nice Finishes Last

A new study holds up a mirror to America’s parents. A surveyed 10,000 middle and high school students in 33 different schools around the nation about what they thought their folks cared about most: that they achieve at a high level, that they are happy (defined as “feeling good most of the time”), or that they care for others. Almost 80 percent of youth picked high achievement or happiness as their top choice, while about 20 percent selected caring for others. The survey also shows that about 80 percent of kids themselves rank achievement or happiness as most important, paralleling what they believe their parents value most.

America’s Young Adults: Special Issue, 2014

American young adults are more racially and ethnically diverse, more likely to graduate from high school, and attend college, and less likely to smoke than previous generations, according to a report by the Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics. However, the young adults have more student debt than generations past, earn less than their counterparts in the year 2000, and more than 1 in 5 are obese, the report says.
The findings are among those reported in a statistical collection by the forum titled, America’s Young Adults: Special Issue, 2014. Young adults are identified as between the ages of 18–24.
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America’s Young Adults: Special Issue, 2014

American young adults are more racially and ethnically diverse, more likely to graduate from high school, and attend college, and less likely to smoke than previous generations, according to a report by the Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics. However, the young adults have more student debt than generations past, earn less than their counterparts in the year 2000, and more than 1 in 5 are obese, the report says.

The findings are among those reported in a statistical collection by the forum titled, America’s Young Adults: Special Issue, 2014. Young adults are identified as between the ages of 18–24.

A 1:1 Teacher's Take On How Students Really Act Online

Why so many kids can’t sit still in school today

The Centers for Disease Control tells us that in recent years there has been a jump in the percentage of young people diagnosed with Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder, commonly known as ADHD: 7.8 percent in 2003 to 9.5 percent in 2007 and to 11 percent in 2011. The reasons for the rise are multiple, and include changes in diagnostic criteria, medication treatment and more awareness of the condition. In the following post, Angela Hanscom, a pediatric occupational therapist and the founder of TimberNook, a nature-based development program designed to foster creativity and independent play outdoors in New England, suggests yet another reason more children are being diagnosed with ADHD, whether or not they really have it: the amount of time kids are forced to sit while they are in school.
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Why so many kids can’t sit still in school today

The Centers for Disease Control tells us that in recent years there has been a jump in the percentage of young people diagnosed with Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder, commonly known as ADHD: 7.8 percent in 2003 to 9.5 percent in 2007 and to 11 percent in 2011. The reasons for the rise are multiple, and include changes in diagnostic criteria, medication treatment and more awareness of the condition.

In the following post, Angela Hanscom, a pediatric occupational therapist and the founder of TimberNook, a nature-based development program designed to foster creativity and independent play outdoors in New England, suggests yet another reason more children are being diagnosed with ADHD, whether or not they really have it: the amount of time kids are forced to sit while they are in school.

Why are kids happy to go to off to school in the first place? It’s not so they can learn the multiplication tables or learn “i before e except after c.” It is to be with other kids. Humans are wired to put a priority on learning how to collaborate, how to turn difference into mutual learning, how to augment our brains through creative, challenging interaction with other brains.

Our Culture Creates the Behavior We Hate