students

Showing 1038 posts tagged students

Colleges Make It Easier for Students to Show, Not Tell, in Their Applications

Robert J. Sternberg, a professor of human development at Cornell and an author of books on teaching and intelligence, said, “A video can measure creativity, initiative and practical skills in a way a typical standardized assessment does not,” but it is not “a substitute for a high school transcript.”

“The video is also susceptible to bias in scoring,” he added, “for example, with regard to the attractiveness, ethnicity, weight or other perceived physical features of the video maker.”

Why Students Should Take the Lead in Parent-Teacher Conferences

As kids learn to advocate for themselves in this way, they discover how to let their parents know more specifically how to support them. Hill tells the story of one student who was clearly intelligent, but struggling with his independent reading. Rambunctious in class, the boy surprised Hill by sitting straight and quietly in his chair when his father, a seemingly stern man, walked into the room. But what surprised him even more was when the boy spoke up for himself during the conference, telling his father: “I realize now that I need to spend more time reading on my own and I need your help with that. I need my three brothers out of the room at night so I can read in silence.”
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Why Students Should Take the Lead in Parent-Teacher Conferences

As kids learn to advocate for themselves in this way, they discover how to let their parents know more specifically how to support them. Hill tells the story of one student who was clearly intelligent, but struggling with his independent reading. Rambunctious in class, the boy surprised Hill by sitting straight and quietly in his chair when his father, a seemingly stern man, walked into the room. But what surprised him even more was when the boy spoke up for himself during the conference, telling his father: “I realize now that I need to spend more time reading on my own and I need your help with that. I need my three brothers out of the room at night so I can read in silence.”

Annual Survey Reveals More Parents Admit They Struggle Helping Their Kids with Homework

From the periodic table to algebraic functions, kids nationwide are back to hitting the books, and many are taking their parents along with them. For the second year running, the National Center for Families Learning (NCFL) asked a question few parents fess up to – are you ever unable to help your kids with their homework?The annual survey revealed that more than 60 percent of parents with children in grades K – 8 (60.1 percent)* admit they have trouble helping with their children’s homework, up from 49.1 percent in 2013. Additionally, more than 25 percent (25.5 percent)* admit the reason is that they are too busy, up from just over 20 percent in 2013.Additionally, parents identified not understanding the subject matter (33.5 percent) and pushback from their kids (41 percent) as reasons for having trouble with homework help.

Annual Survey Reveals More Parents Admit They Struggle Helping Their Kids with Homework

From the periodic table to algebraic functions, kids nationwide are back to hitting the books, and many are taking their parents along with them. For the second year running, the National Center for Families Learning (NCFL) asked a question few parents fess up to – are you ever unable to help your kids with their homework?

The annual survey revealed that more than 60 percent of parents with children in grades K – 8 (60.1 percent)* admit they have trouble helping with their children’s homework, up from 49.1 percent in 2013. Additionally, more than 25 percent (25.5 percent)* admit the reason is that they are too busy, up from just over 20 percent in 2013.

Additionally, parents identified not understanding the subject matter (33.5 percent) and pushback from their kids (41 percent) as reasons for having trouble with homework help.

Oregon Program Breaks Up School Day with Brief Exercise

A new survey finds that an exercise DVD that adds short breaks of physical activity to the daily routine of elementary school students was very popular with both students and teachers, and offered clear advantages for overly sedentary educational programs.
Brain Breaks leads children in five to seven minute segments of physical activity, demonstrated by OSU students and elementary school children from Corvallis, Oregon. The short periods of exercise aim to improve the physical health, mental awareness, and educational success of children.

Oregon Program Breaks Up School Day with Brief Exercise

A new survey finds that an exercise DVD that adds short breaks of physical activity to the daily routine of elementary school students was very popular with both students and teachers, and offered clear advantages for overly sedentary educational programs.

Brain Breaks leads children in five to seven minute segments of physical activity, demonstrated by OSU students and elementary school children from Corvallis, Oregon. The short periods of exercise aim to improve the physical health, mental awareness, and educational success of children.

When You Don’t Fit In

Yes, she has test anxiety. Yes, she has cried. But when I hear ‘test prep,’ I’m thinking, This is reality. People prep for the SATs, people prep to get jobs. When her name goes up on the wall in the lower group, I try to talk to her about how we use that to get better. I can’t let my kids fall into poverty. I comfort her, but I tell her: ‘I make $14.42 an hour. What are you going to do to have a better life?’

Mother of three in The Battle for New York Schools: Eva Moskowitz vs. Mayor Bill de Blasio

Measuring Students’ Self-Control: A ‘Marshmallow Test’ for the Digital Age

Officially known as the “academic diligence task,” the new computer-based test offers students a choice between doing math or watching videos or playing a video game. The test was created by postdoctoral research fellow Brian Galla and associate psychology professor Angela Duckworth of the University of Pennsylvania, with Sidney D’Mello of the University of Notre Dame, as a better (and free) research tool for measuring self-control. The researchers hope this new tool will advance their studies of ways to improve academic perseverance in students.A report recently published online by the team documents the test’s reliability and validity and shows that performance on the task predicts academic achievement — including whether high school seniors graduate on time and enroll in college.
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Measuring Students’ Self-Control: A ‘Marshmallow Test’ for the Digital Age

Officially known as the “academic diligence task,” the new computer-based test offers students a choice between doing math or watching videos or playing a video game. The test was created by postdoctoral research fellow Brian Galla and associate psychology professor Angela Duckworth of the University of Pennsylvania, with Sidney D’Mello of the University of Notre Dame, as a better (and free) research tool for measuring self-control. The researchers hope this new tool will advance their studies of ways to improve academic perseverance in students.

A report recently published online by the team documents the test’s reliability and validity and shows that performance on the task predicts academic achievement — including whether high school seniors graduate on time and enroll in college.


There’s no such thing as a “normal brain.” In fact, there’s a lot of diversity in how different brains process information — a challenge for educators tasked with teaching a diverse group of learners. Dyslexia is a common variation that affects how kids read, but what’s really going inside the brain of someone affected by it? Kelli Sandman-Hurley’s TED-Ed video explains.

What’s Going On Inside A Dyslexic Student’s Brain?

There’s no such thing as a “normal brain.” In fact, there’s a lot of diversity in how different brains process information — a challenge for educators tasked with teaching a diverse group of learners. Dyslexia is a common variation that affects how kids read, but what’s really going inside the brain of someone affected by it? Kelli Sandman-Hurley’s TED-Ed video explains.

What’s Going On Inside A Dyslexic Student’s Brain?

Are College Students Really Obsessed With Technology?

Every year, the re:fuel agency College Explorer does a huge study among all types of students in the 18-24 and 25-34 year old age groups. You can see the full report by clicking here, but the key findings have been summed up in the handy infographic below that they’ve made to accompany the study. Keep reading and you’ll have a pretty good idea of what college students are looking like these days – in so many different aspects!
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Are College Students Really Obsessed With Technology?

Every year, the re:fuel agency College Explorer does a huge study among all types of students in the 18-24 and 25-34 year old age groups. You can see the full report by clicking here, but the key findings have been summed up in the handy infographic below that they’ve made to accompany the study. Keep reading and you’ll have a pretty good idea of what college students are looking like these days – in so many different aspects!