stats

Showing 263 posts tagged stats

The future of textbooks

Since 2012, we have been gathering data on how US college students acquire course materials. Our annual survey of more than 1,000 students shows steady growth in the textbook-rental market. In our 2012 survey, 10 percent of all assigned textbooks were rented. Some 30 percent of textbooks were purchased new, and about 45 percent were bought used. (The remaining 15 percent includes basic e-book sales and books that were shared, borrowed, or pirated.) One year later, the proportion of rented textbooks had doubled to about 20 percent, compared with 30 percent bought new and 40 percent bought used. And in our 2014 survey, the rental share was 25 percent, compared with 30 percent for new and 35 percent for used (Exhibit 1, above).
High-res

The future of textbooks

Since 2012, we have been gathering data on how US college students acquire course materials. Our annual survey of more than 1,000 students shows steady growth in the textbook-rental market. In our 2012 survey, 10 percent of all assigned textbooks were rented. Some 30 percent of textbooks were purchased new, and about 45 percent were bought used. (The remaining 15 percent includes basic e-book sales and books that were shared, borrowed, or pirated.) One year later, the proportion of rented textbooks had doubled to about 20 percent, compared with 30 percent bought new and 40 percent bought used. And in our 2014 survey, the rental share was 25 percent, compared with 30 percent for new and 35 percent for used (Exhibit 1, above).

Greener, Cheaper, and More Mobile

States may be getting a deal for their teachers. The Consortium for Policy Research in Education (CPRE) recently released a report on the changing trends in the teaching workforce. The authors—Ingersoll, Merril, and Stuckey—found seven trends in the data. The teaching force is simultaneously becoming: larger, older, younger and less experienced, more female, more racially diverse, and more consistent in academic ability. Important to the topic of state pension plans, the report findings mean that states have more retirees to pay for. But at the same time, states are hiring younger and more transient teachers who can be paid lower salaries and often leave before qualifying for a large or even moderate pension. It’s ostensibly a bargain for the state, but a loss for individual teachers.
High-res

Greener, Cheaper, and More Mobile

States may be getting a deal for their teachers. The Consortium for Policy Research in Education (CPRE) recently released a report on the changing trends in the teaching workforce. The authors—Ingersoll, Merril, and Stuckey—found seven trends in the data. The teaching force is simultaneously becoming: larger, older, younger and less experienced, more female, more racially diverse, and more consistent in academic ability. Important to the topic of state pension plans, the report findings mean that states have more retirees to pay for. But at the same time, states are hiring younger and more transient teachers who can be paid lower salaries and often leave before qualifying for a large or even moderate pension. It’s ostensibly a bargain for the state, but a loss for individual teachers.

The Call: More College-and-Career-Ready Students

High school graduation is the final act in the American teenage rite of passage. Each spring, “Pomp and Circumstance” plays, speeches are delivered, and cameras flash as graduates cross the stage to receive their diplomas. But finishing high school provides students with something far more valuable than photos and memories. It is a prerequisite for life-long economic stability. Without a high school degree, college—let alone the federal financial aid to pay for it—is off the table. And good luck trying to get a well-paying job, or any job, as a high school dropout.
High-res

The Call: More College-and-Career-Ready Students

High school graduation is the final act in the American teenage rite of passage. Each spring, “Pomp and Circumstance” plays, speeches are delivered, and cameras flash as graduates cross the stage to receive their diplomas. But finishing high school provides students with something far more valuable than photos and memories. It is a prerequisite for life-long economic stability. Without a high school degree, college—let alone the federal financial aid to pay for it—is off the table. And good luck trying to get a well-paying job, or any job, as a high school dropout.
America’s Young Adults: Special Issue, 2014

American young adults are more racially and ethnically diverse, more likely to graduate from high school, and attend college, and less likely to smoke than previous generations, according to a report by the Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics. However, the young adults have more student debt than generations past, earn less than their counterparts in the year 2000, and more than 1 in 5 are obese, the report says.
The findings are among those reported in a statistical collection by the forum titled, America’s Young Adults: Special Issue, 2014. Young adults are identified as between the ages of 18–24.

America’s Young Adults: Special Issue, 2014

American young adults are more racially and ethnically diverse, more likely to graduate from high school, and attend college, and less likely to smoke than previous generations, according to a report by the Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics. However, the young adults have more student debt than generations past, earn less than their counterparts in the year 2000, and more than 1 in 5 are obese, the report says.

The findings are among those reported in a statistical collection by the forum titled, America’s Young Adults: Special Issue, 2014. Young adults are identified as between the ages of 18–24.

micdotcom shares:

 8 charts parents of millennials need to see

There’s a simple reason young adults are living at home in higher numbers: For many, moving out means living in poverty.

The numbers are jarring. According to the Pew Research Center, a whopping 56% of 18-24 year olds lived at home in 2012, the highest rate since the 1970s. Today’s young adults are taking longer to reach life milestones like taking out a mortgage or getting married. The New Republic has dubbed this trend the Great Delay.

Read more | Follow micdotcom 

The segregation of kindergartners — by the numbers

Here, from the non-profit Economic Policy Institute, is a snapshot of how segregated public schools are, starting in kindergarten. It was written by Elaine Weiss and Emma García. Weiss  has served as the national coordinator for the Broader, Bolder Approach to Education since 2011.  García, who joined the Economic Policy Institute in 2013, specializes in the economics of education and education policy.  EPI was created in 1986 to broaden the discussion about economic policy to include the interests of low- and middle-income workers.
High-res

The segregation of kindergartners — by the numbers

Here, from the non-profit Economic Policy Institute, is a snapshot of how segregated public schools are, starting in kindergarten. It was written by Elaine Weiss and Emma García. Weiss  has served as the national coordinator for the Broader, Bolder Approach to Education since 2011. García, who joined the Economic Policy Institute in 2013, specializes in the economics of education and education policy.  EPI was created in 1986 to broaden the discussion about economic policy to include the interests of low- and middle-income workers.

Violent deaths at US schools remain quite rare

Are US schools getting increasingly violent? According to one estimate, there have been 74 school shootings since the December 2012 attack at Sandy Hook Elementary School. But another analysis shows violent crimes declining at schools for 20 years. Now, Drew DeSilver of the Pew Research Center has decided to analyze on all violent deaths associated with elementary and secondary schools — here’s what he found.

Violent deaths at US schools remain quite rare

Are US schools getting increasingly violent? According to one estimate, there have been 74 school shootings since the December 2012 attack at Sandy Hook Elementary School. But another analysis shows violent crimes declining at schools for 20 years. Now, Drew DeSilver of the Pew Research Center has decided to analyze on all violent deaths associated with elementary and secondary schools — here’s what he found.

What About ‘The Fifth’ Who Won’t Graduate from High School?

This year, for the first time in the U.S., high school graduation rates may top 80 percent—good news, right? But another change in 2014 could pose employment and mobility obstacles for the other 20 percent.

Starting in January, the General Education Development test (or GED) that diploma-less adults take to show that they have high-school level skills got a lot harder. Doing well on the new test should make it easier to get into college or land a job, but doing well now requires a new level of help that too few studying for the GED can get.

The beginning of the school year is the most dangerous time for teens

Simple assault is the only type of crime that’s more common in fall than any other time of year. The reason for this isn’t that it’s somehow an autumnal sort of crime; it’s that teens are disproportionately the victims of simple assault, and teen crime patterns are different from adults.Among adults, simple assault is most common in the summer — just like any other sort of violent crime. But teens are actually safest in summer, when they’re out of school. It’s when they get back to the classroom in the fall that they’re most at risk for simple assault.

The beginning of the school year is the most dangerous time for teens

Simple assault is the only type of crime that’s more common in fall than any other time of year. The reason for this isn’t that it’s somehow an autumnal sort of crime; it’s that teens are disproportionately the victims of simple assault, and teen crime patterns are different from adults.

Among adults, simple assault is most common in the summer — just like any other sort of violent crime. But teens are actually safest in summer, when they’re out of school. It’s when they get back to the classroom in the fall that they’re most at risk for simple assault.

Public Schools Are Hurting More in the Recovery Than in the Recession

Once the recession ended, however, so did the stimulus — long before state and local governments were ready to pick up the slack. Federal per-student spending fell more than 20 percent from 2010 to 2012, and it has continued to fall. State and local funding per student were essentially flat in 2012, the most recent year for which data is available.
The result: Total school funding fell in 2012 for the first time since 1977, the Census Bureau reported last month. Adjusting for inflation and growth in student enrollment, spending fell every year from 2010 to 2012, even as costs for health care, pension plans and special education programs continued to rise faster than inflation.1 Urban districts have been particularly hard-hit by the cuts in federal education spending: Nearly 90 percent of big-city school districts spent less per student in 2012 than when the recession ended in 2009.2

Public Schools Are Hurting More in the Recovery Than in the Recession

Once the recession ended, however, so did the stimulus — long before state and local governments were ready to pick up the slack. Federal per-student spending fell more than 20 percent from 2010 to 2012, and it has continued to fall. State and local funding per student were essentially flat in 2012, the most recent year for which data is available.

The result: Total school funding fell in 2012 for the first time since 1977, the Census Bureau reported last month. Adjusting for inflation and growth in student enrollment, spending fell every year from 2010 to 2012, even as costs for health care, pension plans and special education programs continued to rise faster than inflation.1 Urban districts have been particularly hard-hit by the cuts in federal education spending: Nearly 90 percent of big-city school districts spent less per student in 2012 than when the recession ended in 2009.2