security

Showing 72 posts tagged security

Technology directors: Are you supporting learning or impeding it?

As a technology director, my job is not just to keep the servers up and the network running. My job is to support and enhance technology’s potential for teaching and learning. My job is to lay the groundwork for innovation and excellence in education. If I am not taking instructional needs into account when I make decisions that impact teachers and students, I am not doing my job.

Cryptolocker Ransomware in the News

You may have heard on the news about an ugly new “ransomware” bug that can infect your computer. This particular one is bad because many of the virus protection companies don’t have a fix out for it yet. (Currently, the fix is to pay the $300 to get your data back.)

Ways to minimize your risk at home:

  • Keep your virus protection up-to-date (AVG / Mcafee / Norton – you should only have one installed! More is never better)
  • Keep your computer updated (Windows / Apple)
  • Check that you don’t have malware on your computer (Malwarebytes – free, works WITH virus protection)
  • Be careful when searching for websites and clicking on links
  • Install CCleaner and run it after every time you use the internet
  • Don’t click on email spam/phishing links
  • BACKUP the data/pictures/files you would be sad to lose using a flash drive, external hard drive, or cloud backup (Dropbox, Carbonite, or Mozy)

IF you want to read more:  You’re infected – if you want to see your data again, pay us $300 in bitcoins / Cryptolocker FAQ

fastcompany:

Yes, the iPhone fingerprint sensor can be “hacked.” No, you shouldn’t worry about it. 

“Even if the attack proves to be real, this isn’t a casual, fast trick. The attacker would have to be lucky enough to get a perfect print of the correct finger to unlock the iPhone, which means they’d have to find that specific print, or be forced to try several fake prints. Anyone this intent on hacking your iPhone would need prolonged access to it.”

More info

pewinternet researches:

New Report: Anonymity, Privacy, and Security Online
We have a new report out today on how internet users navigate anonymity, privacy, and security online.
One of the big findings in the report is that young adults ages 18-29 are more likely than their elders to take steps to be hidden online, as this chart shows. Other findings:
21% of internet users have had an email or social networking account compromised or taken over by someone else without permission.
12% have been stalked or harassed online.
11% have had important personal information stolen such as their Social Security Number, credit card, or bank account information.
6% have been the victim of an online scam and lost money.
6% have had their reputation damaged because of something that happened online.
4% have been led into physical danger because of something that happened online.
Read more…
High-res

pewinternet researches:

New Report: Anonymity, Privacy, and Security Online

We have a new report out today on how internet users navigate anonymity, privacy, and security online.

One of the big findings in the report is that young adults ages 18-29 are more likely than their elders to take steps to be hidden online, as this chart shows. Other findings:

  • 21% of internet users have had an email or social networking account compromised or taken over by someone else without permission.
  • 12% have been stalked or harassed online.
  • 11% have had important personal information stolen such as their Social Security Number, credit card, or bank account information.
  • 6% have been the victim of an online scam and lost money.
  • 6% have had their reputation damaged because of something that happened online.
  • 4% have been led into physical danger because of something that happened online.

Read more

High-Tech Cheaters Pose Test

Fighting test cheating is an age-old battle, as shown by recent major scandals involving pencil-and-paper exams. But worries about hacking and other sophisticated forms of cheating, such as wirelessly transmitting questions outside of an exam room, has testing companies, test-security firms and academics rushing to develop measures to reduce or catch cheating. Companies plan to soon start selling security packages to school districts and licensing boards.

futurejournalismproject:

When the Government Comes Knocking, Who Has Your Back?

Hat tip to Josh Stearns for making us aware of this 2012 report.

Via the Electronic Frontier Foundation:

When you use the Internet, you entrust your online conversations, thoughts, experiences, locations, photos, and more to companies like Google, AT&T and Facebook. But what happens when the government demands that these companies to hand over your private information? Will the company stand with you? Will it tell you that the government is looking for your data so that you can take steps to protect yourself?

The Electronic Frontier Foundation examined the policies of 18 major Internet companies — including email providers, ISPs, cloud storage providers, and social networking sites — to assess whether they publicly commit to standing with users when the government seeks access to user data. We looked at their terms of service, privacy policies, and published law enforcement guides, if any. We also examined their track record of fighting for user privacy in the courts and whether they’re members of the Digital Due Process coalition, which works to improve outdated communications law. Finally, we contacted each of the companies with our conclusions and gave them an opportunity to respond and provide us evidence of improved policies and practices. These categories are not the only ways that a company can stand up for users, of course, but they are important and publicly verifiable.

While some Internet companies have stepped up for users in particular situations, it’s time for all companies that hold private user data to make public commitments to defend their users against government overreach. The purpose of this report is to incentivize companies to be transparent about what data flows to the government and encourage them to take a stand for user privacy when it is possible to do so.

Read through for the report’s findings.