science

Showing 760 posts tagged science

The 14 Best Resources on the Web for STEM Educators
MIT Open Courseware
National STEM Video Game Challenge
How-to-Geek
Tuts+
Wikiversity
Khan Academy
PEOI
Academic Earth
50 Sources of Free STEM Education
The 10 Best STEM Resources for preK-12
STEM to STEAM: Resource Roundup
Top 10 Online STEM Resources for Advanced Students
7 STEM Apps for Higher Order Thinking
The Ultimate STEM Guide for Kids

image via flickr:CC | Brookhaven National Laboratory High-res

The 14 Best Resources on the Web for STEM Educators

  1. MIT Open Courseware
  2. National STEM Video Game Challenge
  3. How-to-Geek
  4. Tuts+
  5. Wikiversity
  6. Khan Academy
  7. PEOI
  8. Academic Earth
  9. 50 Sources of Free STEM Education
  10. The 10 Best STEM Resources for preK-12
  11. STEM to STEAM: Resource Roundup
  12. Top 10 Online STEM Resources for Advanced Students
  13. 7 STEM Apps for Higher Order Thinking
  14. The Ultimate STEM Guide for Kids

image via flickr:CC | Brookhaven National Laboratory

image via flickr:CC | Scott Heinowski
How to train a robot: Can we teach robots right from wrong?

From performing surgery and flying planes to babysitting kids and driving cars, today’s robots can do it all. With chatbots such as Eugene Goostman recently being hailed as “passing” the Turing test, it appears robots are becoming increasingly adept at posing as humans. While machines are becoming ever more integrated into human lives, the need to imbue them with a sense of morality becomes increasingly urgent. But can we really teach robots how to be good?
High-res

image via flickr:CC | Scott Heinowski

How to train a robot: Can we teach robots right from wrong?

From performing surgery and flying planes to babysitting kids and driving cars, today’s robots can do it all. With chatbots such as Eugene Goostman recently being hailed as “passing” the Turing test, it appears robots are becoming increasingly adept at posing as humans. While machines are becoming ever more integrated into human lives, the need to imbue them with a sense of morality becomes increasingly urgent. But can we really teach robots how to be good?

Pinpointing specific genetic variants — areas of the genetic code that vary from person to person — wasn’t always possible, so it was hard to tell whether caffeine was the most important factor in coffee drinking behaviors. Now that scientists can decipher the genetic components of behaviors, we’re that much closer to figuring out why coffee affects us the way it does.

Here’s why you’re bouncing off the walls: the genetics of coffee consumption (via thisistheverge)

How curiosity changes the brain to enhance learning

The more curious we are about a topic, the easier it is to learn information about that topic. New research publishing online October 2 in the Cell Press journal Neuron provides insights into what happens in our brains when curiosity is piqued. The findings could help scientists find ways to enhance overall learning and memory in both healthy individuals and those with neurological conditions."Our findings potentially have far-reaching implications for the public because they reveal insights into how a form of intrinsic motivation — curiosity — affects memory. These findings suggest ways to enhance learning in the classroom and other settings," says lead author Dr. Matthias Gruber, of University of California at Davis.

image via flickr:CC | Shuji Moriwaki High-res

How curiosity changes the brain to enhance learning

The more curious we are about a topic, the easier it is to learn information about that topic. New research publishing online October 2 in the Cell Press journal Neuron provides insights into what happens in our brains when curiosity is piqued. The findings could help scientists find ways to enhance overall learning and memory in both healthy individuals and those with neurological conditions.

"Our findings potentially have far-reaching implications for the public because they reveal insights into how a form of intrinsic motivation — curiosity — affects memory. These findings suggest ways to enhance learning in the classroom and other settings," says lead author Dr. Matthias Gruber, of University of California at Davis.

image via flickr:CC | Shuji Moriwaki

Strategic or random? How the brain chooses

Many of the choices we make are informed by experiences we’ve had in the past. But occasionally we’re better off abandoning those lessons and exploring a new situation unfettered by past experiences. Scientists at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Janelia Research Campus have shown that the brain can temporarily disconnect information about past experience from decision-making circuits, thereby triggering random behavior.
High-res

Strategic or random? How the brain chooses

Many of the choices we make are informed by experiences we’ve had in the past. But occasionally we’re better off abandoning those lessons and exploring a new situation unfettered by past experiences. Scientists at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Janelia Research Campus have shown that the brain can temporarily disconnect information about past experience from decision-making circuits, thereby triggering random behavior.

Reflected smartphone transmissions enable gesture control

With almost all of the U.S. population armed with cellphones — and close to 80 percent carrying a smartphone — mobile phones have become second-nature for most people.What’s coming next, say University of Washington researchers, is the ability to interact with our devices not just with touchscreens, but through gestures in the space around the phone. Some smartphones are starting to incorporate 3-D gesture sensing based on cameras, for example, but cameras consume significant battery power and require a clear view of the user’s hands.UW engineers have developed a new form of low-power wireless sensing technology that could soon contribute to this growing field by letting users “train” their smartphones to recognize and respond to specific hand gestures near the phone.

Gif/Video source

Reflected smartphone transmissions enable gesture control

With almost all of the U.S. population armed with cellphones — and close to 80 percent carrying a smartphone — mobile phones have become second-nature for most people.

What’s coming next, say University of Washington researchers, is the ability to interact with our devices not just with touchscreens, but through gestures in the space around the phone. Some smartphones are starting to incorporate 3-D gesture sensing based on cameras, for example, but cameras consume significant battery power and require a clear view of the user’s hands.

UW engineers have developed a new form of low-power wireless sensing technology that could soon contribute to this growing field by letting users “train” their smartphones to recognize and respond to specific hand gestures near the phone.

Gif/Video source

Web-based training can reduce campus rape, study concludes

Better Sleep Equals Better Brain

A new study shows a link between poor sleep quality and faster rates of decline in brain volume. According to researchers, sleep is the “brain’s housekeeper,” working to repair and restore the brain.
The study from researchers at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom included 147 adults between the ages of 20 and 84. Researchers examined the link between sleep difficulties, such as having trouble falling asleep or staying asleep at night, and brain volume.

Better Sleep Equals Better Brain

A new study shows a link between poor sleep quality and faster rates of decline in brain volume. According to researchers, sleep is the “brain’s housekeeper,” working to repair and restore the brain.

The study from researchers at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom included 147 adults between the ages of 20 and 84. Researchers examined the link between sleep difficulties, such as having trouble falling asleep or staying asleep at night, and brain volume.

Can a stack of computer servers survive an earthquake?

In high-seismic regions, new facilities often are engineered with passive protective systems that provide overall seismic protection. But often, existing facilities are conventional fixed-base buildings in which seismic demands on sensitive equipment located within are significantly amplified. In such buildings, sensitive equipment needs to be secured from these damaging earthquake effects.

Can a stack of computer servers survive an earthquake?

In high-seismic regions, new facilities often are engineered with passive protective systems that provide overall seismic protection. But often, existing facilities are conventional fixed-base buildings in which seismic demands on sensitive equipment located within are significantly amplified. In such buildings, sensitive equipment needs to be secured from these damaging earthquake effects.

Scientists Use Internet For Brain-To-Brain Communication

Ah, the internet. It lets us do so many things: from ordering pizza to browsing endless cat pictures and now… telepathy?
A study by a group of international scientists published in PLOS One found a brain could transmit a message to another brain through internet channels, and as if that weren’t enough — they did it across continents.

Scientists Use Internet For Brain-To-Brain Communication

Ah, the internet. It lets us do so many things: from ordering pizza to browsing endless cat pictures and now… telepathy?

A study by a group of international scientists published in PLOS One found a brain could transmit a message to another brain through internet channels, and as if that weren’t enough — they did it across continents.