science

Showing 688 posts tagged science

7 Sites for Helping Students Learn About Wildlife

Earth Day is coming up next week on April 22nd. This week before Earth Day is a good time for lessons about the wildlife that can benefit from the conservation efforts promoted through Earth Day. 

Arkive.org
Polar Bears International
WWF Together
Explore.org
Wild Earth 
WWF Wildfinder
NOAA’s Games Planet Arcade 
image via flickr:CC | Cowgirl111 High-res

7 Sites for Helping Students Learn About Wildlife

Earth Day is coming up next week on April 22nd. This week before Earth Day is a good time for lessons about the wildlife that can benefit from the conservation efforts promoted through Earth Day.

  1. Arkive.org
  2. Polar Bears International
  3. WWF Together
  4. Explore.org
  5. Wild Earth
  6. WWF Wildfinder
  7. NOAA’s Games Planet Arcade

image via flickr:CC | Cowgirl111

nprmusic:

skunkbear:

A couple months ago I shared some GIFs of invisible things, and I finally got around to putting them together in this video:

When light travels through areas of different air density, it bends. You’ve probably noticed the way distant pavement seems to shimmer on a hot day, or the way stars appear to twinkle. You’re seeing light that has been distorted as it passes through varying air densities, which are in turn created by varying temperatures and pressures.

Schlieren Flow Visualization can be used to visually capture these changes in density: the rising heat from a candle, the turbulence around an airplane wing, the plume of a sneeze … even sound.  Special thanks to Mike Hargather, a professor of mechanical engineering at New Mexico Tech, who kindly provided a lot of these videos.

Science!

Poverty ‘ages’ genes of young children, study shows

aljazeeraamerica:

The stress of growing up in a poor and unstable household affects children as young as 9 years old on a genetic level, shortening a portion of their chromosomes that scientists say is a key indicator of aging and illness, according to a study released Monday. The researchers say their findings are the first that document this type of genetic change among minority children, and make a strong case for the importance of early-childhood intervention in vulnerable communities.

Researchers examined the DNA of a small group of 9-year-old African-American boys who had experienced chronic stress as a result of growing up in families with poor socioeconomic status. They found that the boys’ telomeres were shorter than those of boys the same age and ethnicity who came from advantaged families.

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(via kenobi-wan-obi)

explore-blog:

A technical glitch causes the Hubble Space Telescope, which ordinarily captures magnificently crisp scientific imagery of the cosmos, to lose balance and create this inadvertent piece of modern art.

It is suspected that in this case, Hubble had locked onto a bad guide star, potentially a double star or binary. This caused an error in the tracking system, resulting in this remarkable picture of brightly colored stellar streaks. The prominent red streaks are from stars in the globular cluster NGC 288. 

High-res

explore-blog:

A technical glitch causes the Hubble Space Telescope, which ordinarily captures magnificently crisp scientific imagery of the cosmos, to lose balance and create this inadvertent piece of modern art.

It is suspected that in this case, Hubble had locked onto a bad guide star, potentially a double star or binary. This caused an error in the tracking system, resulting in this remarkable picture of brightly colored stellar streaks. The prominent red streaks are from stars in the globular cluster NGC 288. 

Green Apple Day of Service

Green Apple Day of Service (GADoS), through the US Green Building Council (USGBC) Center for Green Schools,
provides an opportunity to transform schools into healthy, safe, and productive learning environments through
local service projects. The GADoS initiative is a great way to involve student groups, parent volunteers, and
local community organizations to make your school building or grounds greener and healthier.
jtotheizzoe:

This is what almost four billion years of human evolution looks like when it’s condensed down to ten seconds, thanks to the fine folks behind the original Cosmos.
From self-replicating bags of chemistry to billions of bacteria to crude multicellular blobs to tiny swimming monsters to clumsily creeping fish to fuzzy proto-mammals to weird, naked, two-legged apes … every cosmic blink holds a beautiful story.
If you’d like to retrace your steps along the path of time that ends with you, I recommend this awesome Wikipedia page.

jtotheizzoe:

This is what almost four billion years of human evolution looks like when it’s condensed down to ten seconds, thanks to the fine folks behind the original Cosmos.

From self-replicating bags of chemistry to billions of bacteria to crude multicellular blobs to tiny swimming monsters to clumsily creeping fish to fuzzy proto-mammals to weird, naked, two-legged apes … every cosmic blink holds a beautiful story.

If you’d like to retrace your steps along the path of time that ends with you, I recommend this awesome Wikipedia page.

Women should embrace the B’s in college to make more later

The college majors that tend to lead to the most profitable professions are also the stingiest about awarding A’s. Science departments grade, on a four-point scale, an average of 0.4 points lower than humanities departments, according to a 2010 analysis of national grading data by Stuart Rojstaczer and Christopher Healy. And two new research studies suggest that women might be abandoning these lucrative disciplines precisely because they’re terrified of getting B’s.
High-res

Women should embrace the B’s in college to make more later

The college majors that tend to lead to the most profitable professions are also the stingiest about awarding A’s. Science departments grade, on a four-point scale, an average of 0.4 points lower than humanities departments, according to a 2010 analysis of national grading data by Stuart Rojstaczer and Christopher Healy. And two new research studies suggest that women might be abandoning these lucrative disciplines precisely because they’re terrified of getting B’s.

Brain Structure Stores Memories By Time

New research shows that the part of the brain called the hippocampus stores memories by their ‘temporal context’ — what happened before and what came after. 
“We need to remember not just what happened, but when,” said Liang-Tien (Frank) Hsieh, a graduate student at the University of California, Davis, Center for Neuroscience and first author on the study.

image via flickr:CC | pahouayang93 High-res

Brain Structure Stores Memories By Time

New research shows that the part of the brain called the hippocampus stores memories by their ‘temporal context’ — what happened before and what came after.

“We need to remember not just what happened, but when,” said Liang-Tien (Frank) Hsieh, a graduate student at the University of California, Davis, Center for Neuroscience and first author on the study.

image via flickr:CC | pahouayang93