science

Showing 733 posts tagged science

Most with college STEM degrees go to work in other fields

People with bachelor’s degrees in science, technology, engineering and math are more likely than other college graduates to have a job, but most of them don’t work in STEM occupations, according to a U.S. Census Bureau report released Thursday. 
Nearly 75 percent of all holders of bachelor’s degrees in STEM disciplines don’t have jobs in STEM occupations, according to a survey that reached 3.5 million homes, said Liana Christin Landivar, a sociologist with the Census Bureau. The bureau’s American Community Survey is the largest household survey in the nation. 
 About half of those who have degrees related to engineering, computers, math and statistics do get a STEM job, the survey found.

Check out the Census Bureau’s interactive tool High-res

Most with college STEM degrees go to work in other fields

People with bachelor’s degrees in science, technology, engineering and math are more likely than other college graduates to have a job, but most of them don’t work in STEM occupations, according to a U.S. Census Bureau report released Thursday.

Nearly 75 percent of all holders of bachelor’s degrees in STEM disciplines don’t have jobs in STEM occupations, according to a survey that reached 3.5 million homes, said Liana Christin Landivar, a sociologist with the Census Bureau. The bureau’s American Community Survey is the largest household survey in the nation.

About half of those who have degrees related to engineering, computers, math and statistics do get a STEM job, the survey found.

Check out the Census Bureau’s interactive tool

Siblings Often Bring Teaching Moments To Playtime

kqedscience:

MIT Finger Device Reads to the Blind in Real Time
“Scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are developing an audio reading device to be worn on the index finger of people whose vision is impaired, giving them affordable and immediate access to printed words.
The so-called FingerReader, a prototype produced by a 3-D printer, fits like a ring on the user’s finger, equipped with a small camera that scans text. A synthesized voice reads words aloud, quickly translating books, restaurant menus and other needed materials for daily living, especially away from home or office.”
Read more from Boston.com.
High-res

kqedscience:

MIT Finger Device Reads to the Blind in Real Time

Scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are developing an audio reading device to be worn on the index finger of people whose vision is impaired, giving them affordable and immediate access to printed words.

The so-called FingerReader, a prototype produced by a 3-D printer, fits like a ring on the user’s finger, equipped with a small camera that scans text. A synthesized voice reads words aloud, quickly translating books, restaurant menus and other needed materials for daily living, especially away from home or office.”

Read more from Boston.com.

When Beliefs and Facts Collide

The deeper problem is that citizens participate in public life precisely because they believe the issues at stake relate to their values and ideals, especially when political parties and other identity-based groups get involved – an outcome that is inevitable on high-profile issues. Those groups can help to mobilize the public and represent their interests, but they also help to produce the factual divisions that are one of the most toxic byproducts of our polarized era. Unfortunately, knowing what scientists think is ultimately no substitute for actually believing it.
High-res

When Beliefs and Facts Collide

The deeper problem is that citizens participate in public life precisely because they believe the issues at stake relate to their values and ideals, especially when political parties and other identity-based groups get involved – an outcome that is inevitable on high-profile issues. Those groups can help to mobilize the public and represent their interests, but they also help to produce the factual divisions that are one of the most toxic byproducts of our polarized era. Unfortunately, knowing what scientists think is ultimately no substitute for actually believing it.

European Students’ Use of ‘Smart Drugs’ Is Said to Rise

Under heavy pressure to excel, significant numbers of European university students are using cognitive enhancers, so-called smart drugs, to keep up with academic demands, recent studies show. 
A lack of long-term research makes it difficult to gauge whether the use of such stimulants, with the aim of improving concentration and memory, is on the rise — and if so, to what degree — says Boris Quednow, an assistant professor and psychologist at the Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Zurich.
Substances used, the study found, included alcohol, the most commonly reported, by 5.6 percent of respondents; methylphenidate — sold under several trade names, including Ritalin — reported by 4.1 percent; sedatives (2.7 percent); beta blockers (1.2 percent); cannabis (2.5 percent); amphetamines (0.4 percent), and cocaine (0.2 percent).

image via flickr:CC | ADHD CENTER High-res

European Students’ Use of ‘Smart Drugs’ Is Said to Rise

Under heavy pressure to excel, significant numbers of European university students are using cognitive enhancers, so-called smart drugs, to keep up with academic demands, recent studies show.

A lack of long-term research makes it difficult to gauge whether the use of such stimulants, with the aim of improving concentration and memory, is on the rise — and if so, to what degree — says Boris Quednow, an assistant professor and psychologist at the Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Zurich.

Substances used, the study found, included alcohol, the most commonly reported, by 5.6 percent of respondents; methylphenidate — sold under several trade names, including Ritalin — reported by 4.1 percent; sedatives (2.7 percent); beta blockers (1.2 percent); cannabis (2.5 percent); amphetamines (0.4 percent), and cocaine (0.2 percent).

image via flickr:CC | ADHD CENTER

Repeated Practice May Not Make You an Expert

With apologies to Malcolm Gladwell, new research finds that deliberate practice may not have nearly as much influence in building expertise as once thought.
In the new study, psychological scientist Brooke Macnamara, Ph.D., of Princeton University, and colleagues offer a dissenting view, suggesting that the amount of practice accumulated over time does not seem to play a huge role in accounting for individual differences in skill or performance.

gif via erdal inci

Repeated Practice May Not Make You an Expert

With apologies to Malcolm Gladwell, new research finds that deliberate practice may not have nearly as much influence in building expertise as once thought.

In the new study, psychological scientist Brooke Macnamara, Ph.D., of Princeton University, and colleagues offer a dissenting view, suggesting that the amount of practice accumulated over time does not seem to play a huge role in accounting for individual differences in skill or performance.

gif via erdal inci

Increased nearsightedness linked to higher education levels and more years spent in school

Researchers have found strong evidence that attaining a higher level of education and spending more years in school are two factors associated with a greater prevalence and severity of nearsightedness, or myopia. The research is the first population-based study to demonstrate that environmental factors may outweigh genetics in the development of myopia.
Results of their work, known as the Gutenberg Health Study, show that myopia appeared to become more prevalent as education level increased:
24 percent with no high school education or other training were nearsighted
35 percent of high school graduates and vocational school graduates were nearsighted
53 percent of university graduates were nearsighted

Increased nearsightedness linked to higher education levels and more years spent in school

Researchers have found strong evidence that attaining a higher level of education and spending more years in school are two factors associated with a greater prevalence and severity of nearsightedness, or myopia. The research is the first population-based study to demonstrate that environmental factors may outweigh genetics in the development of myopia.

Results of their work, known as the Gutenberg Health Study, show that myopia appeared to become more prevalent as education level increased:

  • 24 percent with no high school education or other training were nearsighted
  • 35 percent of high school graduates and vocational school graduates were nearsighted
  • 53 percent of university graduates were nearsighted
Follow Why Free Play Is the Best Summer School

Unscheduled, unsupervised, playtime is one of the most valuable educational opportunities we give our children. It is fertile ground; the place where children strengthen social bonds, build emotional maturity, develop cognitive skills, and shore up their physical health. The value of free play,  daydreaming, risk-taking, and independent discovery have been much in the news this year, and a new study by psychologists at the University of Colorado reveals just how important these activities are in the development of children’s executive functioning.

image via flickr:CC | Pensiero High-res

Follow Why Free Play Is the Best Summer School

Unscheduled, unsupervised, playtime is one of the most valuable educational opportunities we give our children. It is fertile ground; the place where children strengthen social bonds, build emotional maturity, develop cognitive skills, and shore up their physical health. The value of free play,  daydreaming, risk-taking, and independent discovery have been much in the news this year, and a new study by psychologists at the University of Colorado reveals just how important these activities are in the development of children’s executive functioning.

image via flickr:CC | Pensiero

Early life stress can leave lasting impacts on the brain

For children, stress can go a long way. A little bit provides a platform for learning, adapting and coping. But a lot of it — chronic, toxic stress like poverty, neglect and physical abuse — can have lasting negative impacts. A team of researchers recently showed these kinds of stressors, experienced in early life, might be changing the parts of developing children’s brains responsible for learning, memory and the processing of stress and emotion.

image via flickr:CC | keirstenmarie High-res

Early life stress can leave lasting impacts on the brain

For children, stress can go a long way. A little bit provides a platform for learning, adapting and coping. But a lot of it — chronic, toxic stress like poverty, neglect and physical abuse — can have lasting negative impacts. A team of researchers recently showed these kinds of stressors, experienced in early life, might be changing the parts of developing children’s brains responsible for learning, memory and the processing of stress and emotion.

image via flickr:CC | keirstenmarie