science

Showing 745 posts tagged science

fastcompany:

Tell a caffeine addict she can’t drink a cup of coffee first thing in the morning and things could get a little ugly—or maybe not.
Coffee is more than just a fetishized drink or a daily ritual. It has the power to transform your productivity. But maybe we’ve been going about it all wrong.
Researcher Steven Miller of the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences in Bethesada found that because our bodies already produce natural hormones that make us feel more alert at certain times in the day, we should curb our caffeine consumption during these times so as not to diminish its effect when we need it most.
He found that the best times to drink coffee (or any caffeinated beverage) for those who wake up between 6 a.m. and 8 a.m. is from 9:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. and between 1:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., since this is when our cortisol levels usually drop off and we begin to feel sluggish.
In other words, having a cup of coffee when you first get up doesn’t actually make you feel more awake.
While the science behind this seemed pretty sound, we wanted to know if the payoff for adjusting our coffee consumption is worth the sacrifice. Some were able to pull it off and loved the results, while others weren’t even able to make a dent in the challenge.
Here’s what happened>
High-res

fastcompany:

Tell a caffeine addict she can’t drink a cup of coffee first thing in the morning and things could get a little ugly—or maybe not.

Coffee is more than just a fetishized drink or a daily ritual. It has the power to transform your productivity. But maybe we’ve been going about it all wrong.

Researcher Steven Miller of the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences in Bethesada found that because our bodies already produce natural hormones that make us feel more alert at certain times in the day, we should curb our caffeine consumption during these times so as not to diminish its effect when we need it most.

He found that the best times to drink coffee (or any caffeinated beverage) for those who wake up between 6 a.m. and 8 a.m. is from 9:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. and between 1:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., since this is when our cortisol levels usually drop off and we begin to feel sluggish.

In other words, having a cup of coffee when you first get up doesn’t actually make you feel more awake.

While the science behind this seemed pretty sound, we wanted to know if the payoff for adjusting our coffee consumption is worth the sacrifice. Some were able to pull it off and loved the results, while others weren’t even able to make a dent in the challenge.

Here’s what happened>

Reading Literature on Screen: A Price for Convenience?

Do people read as well on screens as they do on paper? Scientists aren’t quite sure. While the type of E Ink used in the latest generation of Kindles and other tablets has been shown to be as or even more legible than printed text, other studies have indicated that — in terms of reading comprehension — the medium doesn’t much matter.
But a forthcoming paper by researchers in France and Norway suggests that there may be some cognitive drawbacks to reading even short works of literature on a screen.
High-res

Reading Literature on Screen: A Price for Convenience?

Do people read as well on screens as they do on paper? Scientists aren’t quite sure. While the type of E Ink used in the latest generation of Kindles and other tablets has been shown to be as or even more legible than printed text, other studies have indicated that — in terms of reading comprehension — the medium doesn’t much matter.

But a forthcoming paper by researchers in France and Norway suggests that there may be some cognitive drawbacks to reading even short works of literature on a screen.

Student Mindset Can Enhance Learning

Emerging research suggests a student’s mental framework influences their recall of material.
“When compared to learners expecting a test, learners expecting to teach recalled more material correctly, they organized their recall more effectively and they had better memory for especially important information,” said lead author John Nestojko, Ph.D.

Student Mindset Can Enhance Learning

Emerging research suggests a student’s mental framework influences their recall of material.

“When compared to learners expecting a test, learners expecting to teach recalled more material correctly, they organized their recall more effectively and they had better memory for especially important information,” said lead author John Nestojko, Ph.D.

Rice Engineering Team Delivers Robot Arm to Teen

The bioengineering students who won last April’s George R. Brown School of Engineering Design Showcase and Competition for their R-ARM, a robotic device for Faught that fits his motorized chair, had the eager team try a nearly finished version Sept. 20 at Shriner’s Hospital for Children in Houston.The arm will allow Faught, who lives with osteogenesis imperfecta, a genetic condition that makes his bones especially brittle, to perform tasks most people take for granted.

Rice Engineering Team Delivers Robot Arm to Teen

The bioengineering students who won last April’s George R. Brown School of Engineering Design Showcase and Competition for their R-ARM, a robotic device for Faught that fits his motorized chair, had the eager team try a nearly finished version Sept. 20 at Shriner’s Hospital for Children in Houston.

The arm will allow Faught, who lives with osteogenesis imperfecta, a genetic condition that makes his bones especially brittle, to perform tasks most people take for granted.

You’re probably not getting enough sleep, but you might not be as far off the mark as you think. Most sleep experts would offer that aiming for between seven to nine hours of snooze time a night is optimal for feeling refreshed and productive the next day. In a new report, however … researchers are closing in on what may just be that magic nightly number—and it’s not nine hours, or even eight as once believed… it’s seven hours of sleep.

The usual caveats apply, and these findings should be taken with a grain of salt. But the results are interesting—especially if you’re the kind of person who struggles with sluggishness throughout the day.

"The lowest mortality and morbidity is with seven hours," [says] Shawn Youngstedt, a professor in the College of Nursing and Health Innovation at Arizona State University Phoenix… "Eight hours or more has consistently been shown to be hazardous."

Intriguing new study on the optimal amount of sleep. But that grain of salt can’t be overstated given the wide variation of “chronotypes” and internal time.

Also see the science of what actually happens while you sleep and how it affects your every waking moment.

(via explore-blog)

sleep

Most with college STEM degrees go to work in other fields

People with bachelor’s degrees in science, technology, engineering and math are more likely than other college graduates to have a job, but most of them don’t work in STEM occupations, according to a U.S. Census Bureau report released Thursday. 
Nearly 75 percent of all holders of bachelor’s degrees in STEM disciplines don’t have jobs in STEM occupations, according to a survey that reached 3.5 million homes, said Liana Christin Landivar, a sociologist with the Census Bureau. The bureau’s American Community Survey is the largest household survey in the nation. 
 About half of those who have degrees related to engineering, computers, math and statistics do get a STEM job, the survey found.

Check out the Census Bureau’s interactive tool High-res

Most with college STEM degrees go to work in other fields

People with bachelor’s degrees in science, technology, engineering and math are more likely than other college graduates to have a job, but most of them don’t work in STEM occupations, according to a U.S. Census Bureau report released Thursday.

Nearly 75 percent of all holders of bachelor’s degrees in STEM disciplines don’t have jobs in STEM occupations, according to a survey that reached 3.5 million homes, said Liana Christin Landivar, a sociologist with the Census Bureau. The bureau’s American Community Survey is the largest household survey in the nation.

About half of those who have degrees related to engineering, computers, math and statistics do get a STEM job, the survey found.

Check out the Census Bureau’s interactive tool