science

Showing 750 posts tagged science

Web-based training can reduce campus rape, study concludes

Better Sleep Equals Better Brain

A new study shows a link between poor sleep quality and faster rates of decline in brain volume. According to researchers, sleep is the “brain’s housekeeper,” working to repair and restore the brain.
The study from researchers at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom included 147 adults between the ages of 20 and 84. Researchers examined the link between sleep difficulties, such as having trouble falling asleep or staying asleep at night, and brain volume.

Better Sleep Equals Better Brain

A new study shows a link between poor sleep quality and faster rates of decline in brain volume. According to researchers, sleep is the “brain’s housekeeper,” working to repair and restore the brain.

The study from researchers at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom included 147 adults between the ages of 20 and 84. Researchers examined the link between sleep difficulties, such as having trouble falling asleep or staying asleep at night, and brain volume.

Can a stack of computer servers survive an earthquake?

In high-seismic regions, new facilities often are engineered with passive protective systems that provide overall seismic protection. But often, existing facilities are conventional fixed-base buildings in which seismic demands on sensitive equipment located within are significantly amplified. In such buildings, sensitive equipment needs to be secured from these damaging earthquake effects.

Can a stack of computer servers survive an earthquake?

In high-seismic regions, new facilities often are engineered with passive protective systems that provide overall seismic protection. But often, existing facilities are conventional fixed-base buildings in which seismic demands on sensitive equipment located within are significantly amplified. In such buildings, sensitive equipment needs to be secured from these damaging earthquake effects.

Scientists Use Internet For Brain-To-Brain Communication

Ah, the internet. It lets us do so many things: from ordering pizza to browsing endless cat pictures and now… telepathy?
A study by a group of international scientists published in PLOS One found a brain could transmit a message to another brain through internet channels, and as if that weren’t enough — they did it across continents.

Scientists Use Internet For Brain-To-Brain Communication

Ah, the internet. It lets us do so many things: from ordering pizza to browsing endless cat pictures and now… telepathy?

A study by a group of international scientists published in PLOS One found a brain could transmit a message to another brain through internet channels, and as if that weren’t enough — they did it across continents.

fastcompany:

Tell a caffeine addict she can’t drink a cup of coffee first thing in the morning and things could get a little ugly—or maybe not.
Coffee is more than just a fetishized drink or a daily ritual. It has the power to transform your productivity. But maybe we’ve been going about it all wrong.
Researcher Steven Miller of the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences in Bethesada found that because our bodies already produce natural hormones that make us feel more alert at certain times in the day, we should curb our caffeine consumption during these times so as not to diminish its effect when we need it most.
He found that the best times to drink coffee (or any caffeinated beverage) for those who wake up between 6 a.m. and 8 a.m. is from 9:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. and between 1:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., since this is when our cortisol levels usually drop off and we begin to feel sluggish.
In other words, having a cup of coffee when you first get up doesn’t actually make you feel more awake.
While the science behind this seemed pretty sound, we wanted to know if the payoff for adjusting our coffee consumption is worth the sacrifice. Some were able to pull it off and loved the results, while others weren’t even able to make a dent in the challenge.
Here’s what happened>
High-res

fastcompany:

Tell a caffeine addict she can’t drink a cup of coffee first thing in the morning and things could get a little ugly—or maybe not.

Coffee is more than just a fetishized drink or a daily ritual. It has the power to transform your productivity. But maybe we’ve been going about it all wrong.

Researcher Steven Miller of the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences in Bethesada found that because our bodies already produce natural hormones that make us feel more alert at certain times in the day, we should curb our caffeine consumption during these times so as not to diminish its effect when we need it most.

He found that the best times to drink coffee (or any caffeinated beverage) for those who wake up between 6 a.m. and 8 a.m. is from 9:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. and between 1:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., since this is when our cortisol levels usually drop off and we begin to feel sluggish.

In other words, having a cup of coffee when you first get up doesn’t actually make you feel more awake.

While the science behind this seemed pretty sound, we wanted to know if the payoff for adjusting our coffee consumption is worth the sacrifice. Some were able to pull it off and loved the results, while others weren’t even able to make a dent in the challenge.

Here’s what happened>

Reading Literature on Screen: A Price for Convenience?

Do people read as well on screens as they do on paper? Scientists aren’t quite sure. While the type of E Ink used in the latest generation of Kindles and other tablets has been shown to be as or even more legible than printed text, other studies have indicated that — in terms of reading comprehension — the medium doesn’t much matter.
But a forthcoming paper by researchers in France and Norway suggests that there may be some cognitive drawbacks to reading even short works of literature on a screen.
High-res

Reading Literature on Screen: A Price for Convenience?

Do people read as well on screens as they do on paper? Scientists aren’t quite sure. While the type of E Ink used in the latest generation of Kindles and other tablets has been shown to be as or even more legible than printed text, other studies have indicated that — in terms of reading comprehension — the medium doesn’t much matter.

But a forthcoming paper by researchers in France and Norway suggests that there may be some cognitive drawbacks to reading even short works of literature on a screen.

Student Mindset Can Enhance Learning

Emerging research suggests a student’s mental framework influences their recall of material.
“When compared to learners expecting a test, learners expecting to teach recalled more material correctly, they organized their recall more effectively and they had better memory for especially important information,” said lead author John Nestojko, Ph.D.

Student Mindset Can Enhance Learning

Emerging research suggests a student’s mental framework influences their recall of material.

“When compared to learners expecting a test, learners expecting to teach recalled more material correctly, they organized their recall more effectively and they had better memory for especially important information,” said lead author John Nestojko, Ph.D.

Rice Engineering Team Delivers Robot Arm to Teen

The bioengineering students who won last April’s George R. Brown School of Engineering Design Showcase and Competition for their R-ARM, a robotic device for Faught that fits his motorized chair, had the eager team try a nearly finished version Sept. 20 at Shriner’s Hospital for Children in Houston.The arm will allow Faught, who lives with osteogenesis imperfecta, a genetic condition that makes his bones especially brittle, to perform tasks most people take for granted.

Rice Engineering Team Delivers Robot Arm to Teen

The bioengineering students who won last April’s George R. Brown School of Engineering Design Showcase and Competition for their R-ARM, a robotic device for Faught that fits his motorized chair, had the eager team try a nearly finished version Sept. 20 at Shriner’s Hospital for Children in Houston.

The arm will allow Faught, who lives with osteogenesis imperfecta, a genetic condition that makes his bones especially brittle, to perform tasks most people take for granted.