psychology

Showing 96 posts tagged psychology

The Problem With Being Gifted

Follow Why Free Play Is the Best Summer School

Unscheduled, unsupervised, playtime is one of the most valuable educational opportunities we give our children. It is fertile ground; the place where children strengthen social bonds, build emotional maturity, develop cognitive skills, and shore up their physical health. The value of free play,  daydreaming, risk-taking, and independent discovery have been much in the news this year, and a new study by psychologists at the University of Colorado reveals just how important these activities are in the development of children’s executive functioning.

image via flickr:CC | Pensiero High-res

Follow Why Free Play Is the Best Summer School

Unscheduled, unsupervised, playtime is one of the most valuable educational opportunities we give our children. It is fertile ground; the place where children strengthen social bonds, build emotional maturity, develop cognitive skills, and shore up their physical health. The value of free play,  daydreaming, risk-taking, and independent discovery have been much in the news this year, and a new study by psychologists at the University of Colorado reveals just how important these activities are in the development of children’s executive functioning.

image via flickr:CC | Pensiero

 Best Learning Approach Uncovered

New research indicates that practicing the right way is crucial to learning new skills.
“The study suggests that learning can be improved,” said Stafford. “You can learn more efficiently or use the same practice time to learn to a higher level. As we live longer, and more of our lives become based around acquiring complex skills, optimal learning becomes increasingly relevant to everyone.


Axon - game used in the study
image via flickr:CC | giulia.forsythe High-res

Best Learning Approach Uncovered

New research indicates that practicing the right way is crucial to learning new skills.

The study suggests that learning can be improved,” said Stafford. “You can learn more efficiently or use the same practice time to learn to a higher level. As we live longer, and more of our lives become based around acquiring complex skills, optimal learning becomes increasingly relevant to everyone.

Axon - game used in the study

image via flickr:CC | giulia.forsythe

When Will We Ever Learn

DON’T TALK ABOUT WORK.

“The habit of going home to your spouse and debriefing them is very intuitive for a lot of people,” says Peter Shallard, a business psychology expert who focuses on entrepreneurs, but it’s a bad idea.

First, “being stuck in your own work problems is a form of self-indulgence,” and second, rehashing a work problem will “stimulate us to mentally regress back to that afternoon when we had that problem.”

Instead, ask your family members (or friends or roommates) about their days, and challenge yourself to be a good listener. Focusing on other people and their needs is a great way to get out of your own head.

How To Stop Obsessing About Work When You’re Not There (via fastcompany)

Classroom Clutter a Distraction to Students?

Elementary school classrooms often include a mosaic of art and educational material cluttering the room, covering walls and sometimes even glazing the ceiling. 
But new research from Carnegie Mellon University shows that too much of a good thing may end up disrupting attention and learning in young children.

image via flickr:CC | woodleywonderworks High-res

Classroom Clutter a Distraction to Students?

Elementary school classrooms often include a mosaic of art and educational material cluttering the room, covering walls and sometimes even glazing the ceiling.

But new research from Carnegie Mellon University shows that too much of a good thing may end up disrupting attention and learning in young children.

image via flickr:CC | woodleywonderworks

nprradiopictures shares:

With parents flooding their camera phones with hundreds of photos — from loose teeth to hissy fits to each step in the potty training process — how might the ubiquity of photos change childhood memories?
Maryanne Garry, a psychology professor at the Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand, is trying to figure that out. For years, she’s studied the effects of photography on our childhood memories.
"I think that the problem is that people are giving away being in the moment," she says.
Those parents at the park taking all those photos are actually paying less attention to the moment, she says, because they’re focused on the act of taking the photo.
Overexposed? Camera Phones Could Be Washing Out Our Memories
Photo Credit: Courtesy of Rebecca Woolf
High-res

nprradiopictures shares:

With parents flooding their camera phones with hundreds of photos — from loose teeth to hissy fits to each step in the potty training process — how might the ubiquity of photos change childhood memories?

Maryanne Garry, a psychology professor at the Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand, is trying to figure that out. For years, she’s studied the effects of photography on our childhood memories.

"I think that the problem is that people are giving away being in the moment," she says.

Those parents at the park taking all those photos are actually paying less attention to the moment, she says, because they’re focused on the act of taking the photo.

Overexposed? Camera Phones Could Be Washing Out Our Memories

Photo Credit: Courtesy of Rebecca Woolf

Going Above and Beyond Does Not Pay Off

policymic:

New study shows that kids who brought a gun to school were likely bullied

Though it could often be an empty exercise to try to figure out what pushes a young student to an act of violence, a new study is shedding some light on the issue. Researchers at the Cohen Children’s Medical Center of New York crunched data from the 2011 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, and they found a highly probable reason why many students bring a weapon to school: bullying.
The study found that in an average 30-day span, around 200,000 high school students who were bullied brought a weapon to school; that is a significant portion of the 750,000 students who are estimated to come armed to class every month. And the likelihood increased with the severity of victimization. 
Read more 

High-res

policymic:

New study shows that kids who brought a gun to school were likely bullied

Though it could often be an empty exercise to try to figure out what pushes a young student to an act of violence, a new study is shedding some light on the issue. Researchers at the Cohen Children’s Medical Center of New York crunched data from the 2011 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, and they found a highly probable reason why many students bring a weapon to school: bullying.

The study found that in an average 30-day span, around 200,000 high school students who were bullied brought a weapon to school; that is a significant portion of the 750,000 students who are estimated to come armed to class every month. And the likelihood increased with the severity of victimization. 

Read more