project

Showing 5 posts tagged project

Understanding the Gates Foundation’s Measuring Effective Teachers Project

So, rather than having “figured out what makes a good teacher” the Gates Foundation has learned very little in this project about effective teaching practices.  The project was an expensive flop.  Let’s not compound the error by adopting this expensive flop as the basis for centrally imposed, mechanistic teacher evaluation systems nationwide.

photo via flickr:CC | Lester Public Library

Understanding the Gates Foundation’s Measuring Effective Teachers Project

So, rather than having “figured out what makes a good teacher” the Gates Foundation has learned very little in this project about effective teaching practices.  The project was an expensive flop.  Let’s not compound the error by adopting this expensive flop as the basis for centrally imposed, mechanistic teacher evaluation systems nationwide.

photo via flickr:CC | Lester Public Library

What Makes Project-Based Learning a Success?

What we found — and what we believe is the key to Manor New Tech’s success — is a schoolwide, unwavering commitment to the design and implementation of a PBL model that includes evidence-based strategies and drives students to actively pursue knowledge. From the moment a project is introduced, students are responsible for figuring out what they need to know and for doing the legwork to find the information, analyze it, and present it. Teachers are there every step of the way to guide students through the process and to provide workshops to help clarify any concepts.

Gee. Huh?: Girl Scouts vs. Girl Scout Cookies

Two Girl Scouts decided to do a project in the hopes of earning a Bronze Star, the highest badge a Girl Scout Junior can earn.   They did a study of orangutans:

Inspired by Jane Goodall’s work with chimpanzees, the girls sought to raise awareness of endangered orangutans. They learned that orangutan habitat in Southeast Asia is disappearing, partly because some rain forests have been cleared for palm oil plantations.

The girls presented their findings to youth groups and created a website about the animals. They also started checking for palm oil on food labels and stopped eating anything containing it.

Guess which major product contains palm oil?

The girls collected their Bronze Award in 2007 and prepared for the cookie-selling season. When their cookies arrived, they turned over the boxes and read the ingredients. There it was: palm oil.

Now, they are mounting a campaign against the use of palm oil in Girl Scout CookiesRead the whole story

via geehuh