productivity

Showing 48 posts tagged productivity

The 40-hour workweek is mostly a thing of the past…

Taking some time off actually improves a worker’s productivity at work. A study from Ernst & Young found that every ten hours of vacation time taken by an employee boosted her year-end performance rating by 8 percent and lowered turnover. Former NASA scientists found that people who take vacations experience an 82 percent increase in job performance upon their return, with longer vacations making more of an impact than short ones.

You’re working too hard.

Why not avoid work altogether, or at least live knowing that presence is more intricate and rewarding an art than productivity?

(via explore-blog)

Why Companies Fail To Engage Today's Workforce: The Overwhelmed Employee

Going Above and Beyond Does Not Pay Off

Shawn Achor: The happy secret to better work

We believe that we should work to be happy, but could that be backwards? In this fast-moving and entertaining talk from TEDxBloomington, psychologist Shawn Achor argues that actually happiness inspires productivity.

Small Changes Ripple Outward: Creating lasting positive change

  • 3 Gratitudes (daily)
  • Journaling (1 positive thing daily)
  • Excercise
  • Meditation
  • Random Acts of Kindness
But what Office provides is a language for doing office things. You don’t go in front of an audience without a PowerPoint deck. Businesspeople “live” in Excel; its language (it actually is a crypto-programming language) has become the language of money and budgets. For people who do work with symbols and language to make a living, they organize their thoughts into the containers and systems that Office provide. Office is not so much a software product as much as a dialect that we all speak in order to work.

The Great Works of Software — Medium (via thisistheverge)

(via thisistheverge)

Tales From the Classroom: The Importance of Time Management 

During my first two years of teaching, it seemed as if I had no personal life. The demands of learning the craft required so much of my time and energy that I would often work 12 to 15 hours a day, with little energy or free time left over. I felt stressed and personally unfulfilled. I started to question whether teaching was a viable career for me.
 This year—my third—I decided that things would be different.

Read how…  
image via flickr:CC | Flotographic Arts High-res

Tales From the Classroom: The Importance of Time Management

During my first two years of teaching, it seemed as if I had no personal life. The demands of learning the craft required so much of my time and energy that I would often work 12 to 15 hours a day, with little energy or free time left over. I felt stressed and personally unfulfilled. I started to question whether teaching was a viable career for me.

This year—my third—I decided that things would be different.

Read how…  

image via flickr:CC | Flotographic Arts

The Polar Vortex Has Made You More Productive

We found that, on a bad-weather day, people are better at focusing on their work not because the weather makes them grumpy but because they have fewer distracting thoughts about what they might otherwise be doing outside. Indeed, cognitive distractions and error rates were greater on nice days than on bad-weather days. 
Given that the weather is beyond their control, how can managers leverage this information?

image via flickr:CC | NASA gsfc High-res

The Polar Vortex Has Made You More Productive

We found that, on a bad-weather day, people are better at focusing on their work not because the weather makes them grumpy but because they have fewer distracting thoughts about what they might otherwise be doing outside. Indeed, cognitive distractions and error rates were greater on nice days than on bad-weather days.

Given that the weather is beyond their control, how can managers leverage this information?

image via flickr:CC | NASA gsfc

Smartphone Use at Night May Lower Productivity

In a pair of studies over a broad spectrum of U.S. workers, Michigan State University’s Russell Johnson, Ph.D., and colleagues found that people who monitored their smart phones for business purposes after 9 p.m. were more tired and were less engaged the following day on the job.
“Because they keep us mentally engaged late into the evening, they make it hard to detach from work so we can relax and fall asleep.”

image via flickr:CC | nayrb7 High-res

Smartphone Use at Night May Lower Productivity

In a pair of studies over a broad spectrum of U.S. workers, Michigan State University’s Russell Johnson, Ph.D., and colleagues found that people who monitored their smart phones for business purposes after 9 p.m. were more tired and were less engaged the following day on the job.

“Because they keep us mentally engaged late into the evening, they make it hard to detach from work so we can relax and fall asleep.”

image via flickr:CC | nayrb7

When you take responsibility for the education of 25 squirmy five-year-olds, you come face to face with the reality that your control is limited and that the only way of making it through the year is to design things so that they increasingly own their own control. Maybe we should have a workshop for all CEO’s and world leaders lead by great kindergarten teachers.

Everything you need to know to run an organization you can learn by watching a great kindergarten teacher

School PD getting you down?

I’ve seen some sad posts about school-led PD and planning sessions this week, here’s something to think about while your mind is numbing…

Too much collaboration at work hurts productivity: study

The study found that the most productive companies foster collaboration along with individual focus, and they design offices that allow employees to do both.

Employees whose companies valued a balance between individual and collaborative work tended to like their jobs more than other respondents, with 36 per cent reporting they were satisfied with their jobs and 23 per cent gave high ratings to their workplace environments.

Your Physical Environment May Influence Your Integrity

New research suggests expansive physical settings can lead people to feel powerful, and thus more apt to engage in dishonest behavior. 
“This is a real concern. Our research shows that office managers should pay attention to the ergonomics of their workspaces. The results suggest that these physical spaces have tangible and real-world impact on our behaviors” said Yap.

image via flickr:CC | Legozilla
What this says about my integrity? I work in the server room, in-between 2 classrooms with no door to the hallway… High-res

Your Physical Environment May Influence Your Integrity

New research suggests expansive physical settings can lead people to feel powerful, and thus more apt to engage in dishonest behavior. 

“This is a real concern. Our research shows that office managers should pay attention to the ergonomics of their workspaces. The results suggest that these physical spaces have tangible and real-world impact on our behaviors” said Yap.

image via flickr:CC | Legozilla

What this says about my integrity? I work in the server room, in-between 2 classrooms with no door to the hallway…

Sleep-Deprived People Are More Likely to Cheat

Good managers focus not only on bottom-line performance, but on the means by which their people achieve that high performance. Unethical behaviors can be damaging to a broad variety of stakeholders, and are often the cause of organizational crises. Ethical behavior not only keeps consciences clean; it can boost the reputation and performance of your firm. More than ever, ethics must be a primary management concern.
Recent research indicates that sleep deprivation drains glucose in the prefrontal cortex. In other words, a lack of sleep robs the fuel for self-control from the region of the brain responsible for self-control, whereas sleep restores it. Building from this research, my colleagues and I investigated the effects of sleep on unethical behavior…

image via flickr:CC | mrjoro High-res

Sleep-Deprived People Are More Likely to Cheat

Good managers focus not only on bottom-line performance, but on the means by which their people achieve that high performance. Unethical behaviors can be damaging to a broad variety of stakeholders, and are often the cause of organizational crises. Ethical behavior not only keeps consciences clean; it can boost the reputation and performance of your firm. More than ever, ethics must be a primary management concern.

Recent research indicates that sleep deprivation drains glucose in the prefrontal cortex. In other words, a lack of sleep robs the fuel for self-control from the region of the brain responsible for self-control, whereas sleep restores it. Building from this research, my colleagues and I investigated the effects of sleep on unethical behavior

image via flickr:CC | mrjoro

Helping Workaholics to Help Employers — And Themselves

Workaholics tend to live in extremes, with great job satisfaction and creativity on the one hand and high levels of frustration and exhaustion on the other hand. A new Florida State University study provides insight to managers on how to help these employees stay healthy and effective on the job.
They found about 60 percent of these workers identified themselves as workaholics who characteristically “feel guilty when taking time off.” These self-identified workaholics reported positive and negative career consequences.
“We discovered that workaholics really struggle when they feel that they are alone or swimming upstream without a paddle,” Hochwarter said.
Workaholics who said they had access to resources reported:
40 percent higher rate of job satisfaction;
33 percent lower rate of burnout;
30 percent higher rate of perceived job importance;
30 percent lower rate of exclusion from others;
25 percent higher rate of career fulfillment;
20 percent lower rate of work frustration.

Takeaway: REALISTIC EXPECTATIONS
image via flickr:CC | jehgasperotto High-res

Helping Workaholics to Help Employers — And Themselves

Workaholics tend to live in extremes, with great job satisfaction and creativity on the one hand and high levels of frustration and exhaustion on the other hand. A new Florida State University study provides insight to managers on how to help these employees stay healthy and effective on the job.

They found about 60 percent of these workers identified themselves as workaholics who characteristically “feel guilty when taking time off.” These self-identified workaholics reported positive and negative career consequences.

“We discovered that workaholics really struggle when they feel that they are alone or swimming upstream without a paddle,” Hochwarter said.

Workaholics who said they had access to resources reported:

  • 40 percent higher rate of job satisfaction;
  • 33 percent lower rate of burnout;
  • 30 percent higher rate of perceived job importance;
  • 30 percent lower rate of exclusion from others;
  • 25 percent higher rate of career fulfillment;
  • 20 percent lower rate of work frustration.

Takeaway: REALISTIC EXPECTATIONS

image via flickr:CC | jehgasperotto