policy

Showing 75 posts tagged policy

Educating Students with Disabilities: ‘Inclusion’ Environment Benefits — Now What?

As a consequence of a 2004 change in federal law, children with disabilities are much more often educated with typically-developing children. That policy, usually called inclusion, assumes that students with disabilities will benefit from this environment. Yet that assumption has largely gone untested. A new study shows that, for at least one aspect of language development, children with disabilities do indeed benefit from inclusion—but not in a way profoundly different than other children.
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Educating Students with Disabilities: ‘Inclusion’ Environment Benefits — Now What?

As a consequence of a 2004 change in federal law, children with disabilities are much more often educated with typically-developing children. That policy, usually called inclusion, assumes that students with disabilities will benefit from this environment. Yet that assumption has largely gone untested. A new study shows that, for at least one aspect of language development, children with disabilities do indeed benefit from inclusion—but not in a way profoundly different than other children.

A Starting Point for Ensuring Student Online Privacy

We don’t hear the word “trust” very often in policy circles. The coin of the realm consists of colder, metallic words like “data,” “sub-population,” and “accountability.” I have heard the bizarre term “psychometrician” more often than I have heard the word “trust.” Yet I can’t think of a more foundational concept to the policy pivot points on everything from testing to teacher prep.

Trust

For Reformers: An Important Paper on Worker Compensation & Incentives

The Kalamazoo Promise Scholarship

If this hypothesis is correct, our findings suggest that Promise-style policies, and other policies focused on making higher education more affordable, may be usefully supplemented by helping students better understand how their behavior affects their future. Subsidies for higher education may have a greater impact on student achievement and behavior if students understand the link between their behavior and work habits and their GPA, and the link between their GPA and the future rewards offered by programs like the Promise.

Teacher Authors--Are Your Books "Big Brother-Proof"?

The situation could get more complicated, though, if a district mandated its teachers to read my book and adopt the approach I share. I’d be happy about this on the one hand, but cautiously so, because I’d wonder this: would it be clear to teachers that they should feel free to pick and choose what they want to implement and to make adaptations to suit their students’ needs and their own teaching styles?  I know I make that point generally throughout the book, but can I be sure that it would come through if the book were forced on people? In other words, is my book “big brother-proof”?

The National Council on Teacher Quality has released its 2013 State Teacher Policy Yearbook National Summary. This year’s average was a C-, up from D+ in 2011 and D in 2009.
Over the past five years, 37 states have improved their overall grades by at least one full grade level because of significant reform, particularly in the areas of teacher evaluation and related teacher effectiveness policies.

Click on a state for detailed information about that state’s teacher policies or explore the results of the 2013 Yearbook further in the State Yearbook Dashboard.

Performance-Based Test for Teachers Rolls Out

As the test, known as the edTPA, kicks into high gear in 2013-14 after two years of pilot testing, thousands more teacher-candidates will be expected to demonstrate those competencies to receive a teaching certificate. New York and Washington state plan to introduce it into licensing by spring. By 2015-16, seven states will make it part of teacher certification or use it to review their preparation programs.

University-based programs have been dogged by criticism—including from U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and nongovernmental groups—and have been pressured to do more to hold themselves accountable. The edTPA, developed by the Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning, and Equity, with the help of state officials and the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education, is the teacher education field’s main response to those pressures.
 But questions linger about whether the edTPA will galvanize widespread improvements in teacher preparation, as its supporters hope.
High-res

Performance-Based Test for Teachers Rolls Out

As the test, known as the edTPA, kicks into high gear in 2013-14 after two years of pilot testing, thousands more teacher-candidates will be expected to demonstrate those competencies to receive a teaching certificate. New York and Washington state plan to introduce it into licensing by spring. By 2015-16, seven states will make it part of teacher certification or use it to review their preparation programs.

University-based programs have been dogged by criticism—including from U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and nongovernmental groups—and have been pressured to do more to hold themselves accountable. The edTPA, developed by the Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning, and Equity, with the help of state officials and the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education, is the teacher education field’s main response to those pressures.

But questions linger about whether the edTPA will galvanize widespread improvements in teacher preparation, as its supporters hope.

College says time’s up for cheaters, bans all watch-wearing during exams

The Artevelde College in Ghent, Belgium, may have recently become the first institution to ban students from wearing watches during exams. According to a report in De Standaard (Google Translate), the new rule is in response to the growing availability of smartwatches and the cheating possibilities that come with it.

image via flickr:CC | Robert Scoble High-res

College says time’s up for cheaters, bans all watch-wearing during exams

The Artevelde College in Ghent, Belgium, may have recently become the first institution to ban students from wearing watches during exams. According to a report in De Standaard (Google Translate), the new rule is in response to the growing availability of smartwatches and the cheating possibilities that come with it.

image via flickr:CC | Robert Scoble

Youth more likely to be bullied at schools with anti-bullying programs

Anti-bullying initiatives have become standard at schools across the country, but a new UT Arlington study finds that students attending those schools may be more likely to be a victim of bullying than children at schools without such programs.

“One possible reason for this is that the students who are victimizing their peers have learned the language from these anti-bullying campaigns and programs,” said Seokjin Jeong, an assistant professor of criminology and criminal justice at UT Arlington and lead author of the study, which was published in the Journal of Criminology.

5 questions to end the school year

Good questions to help define your school/district’s technology vision:

  1. To what extent do you compare and align your school technology plan with other plans such as your school improvement plan?
  2. To what extent do you promote participation of your school’s stakeholders in the technology planning process of your school or district?
  3. To what extent did you disseminate or model best practices in learning and teaching with technology to faculty and staff?
  4. To what extent do you include the effective use of technology as a criterion for assessing the performance of faculty?
  5. To what extent do you participate in professional development activities meant to improve and expand your use of technology?