mobile

Showing 51 posts tagged mobile

Curriki Geometry Goes Mobile

This month Curriki revamped their geometry site to accommodate viewing on mobile phones, iPads, and Android tablets. Curriki’s geometry course features six PBL projects. Each of the projects is aligned to Common Core Standards. The course is not a self-directed course for students. The course is designed to be taught by mathematics teachers who want to incorporate PBL.
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Curriki Geometry Goes Mobile

This month Curriki revamped their geometry site to accommodate viewing on mobile phones, iPads, and Android tablets.

Curriki’s geometry course features six PBL projects. Each of the projects is aligned to Common Core Standards. The course is not a self-directed course for students. The course is designed to be taught by mathematics teachers who want to incorporate PBL.

2013 Education Technology Trends

There has been a shift from desktop towards mobile technology, and sales are slated to keep moving more towards mobile devices.
Gamification is huge: The market is predicted to go from $2.0bn in 2012 to $7.4bn in 2015.
Passive technology use in the classroom (like using a powerpoint) is being forgone for more interactive technology usage.
MOOCs: The jury is still out on whether 2013 will be the year of bubble or bust for MOOCs.
HTML5 and Tin Can API are gaining more popularity.
Responsive web design is taking over (to enable usability across a range of devices).
The average age of online learners is increasing (27 in 2002 to 34 in 2013).
There is a huge increase in the global online learning market: They’re forecasting a compounded annual growth rate of 7.9% from 2012-16.
High-res

2013 Education Technology Trends

  • There has been a shift from desktop towards mobile technology, and sales are slated to keep moving more towards mobile devices.
  • Gamification is huge: The market is predicted to go from $2.0bn in 2012 to $7.4bn in 2015.
  • Passive technology use in the classroom (like using a powerpoint) is being forgone for more interactive technology usage.
  • MOOCs: The jury is still out on whether 2013 will be the year of bubble or bust for MOOCs.
  • HTML5 and Tin Can API are gaining more popularity.
  • Responsive web design is taking over (to enable usability across a range of devices).
  • The average age of online learners is increasing (27 in 2002 to 34 in 2013).
  • There is a huge increase in the global online learning market: They’re forecasting a compounded annual growth rate of 7.9% from 2012-16.

AT&T Considers Selling Your Browsing History, Location, And More To Advertisers. Here’s How To Opt Out

The link you’ll need for AT&T: http://att.com/cmpchoice. Don’t forget if you’ve got different accounts for wireless and home service, you’ll need to login to both and opt-out. Also:

It’s #FF on Twitter - if you’re not following on twitter today is a great day to start; she’s an amazing resource!

I have been traveling throughout Slovenia and Croatia for the past month training teachers in integrating Bring Your Own Technology (BYOT) effectively with their classes. I was very fortunate to have the opportunity to teach various classes of teens throughout the two countries to show teachers how BYOT works. For the days I was teaching the students, these schools lifted their policies and allowed the students to use their devices as a way of getting technology in the schools. The teachers wanted to see BYOT in action, especially with students who were never allowed to use their mobile devices or other technologies before for learning. BYOT was a great option because many of these students would not usually be able to learn with various technologies in schools if they didn’t bring them in.

Tough Questions on Texting in the Classroom
image via flickr:CC | Stitch

Does it make sense to ban texting if students ignore the ban and teachers back away from enforcing it? Can a ban be enforced? How about in a large course, can it be enforced then? Should it be enforced?  What are the costs of enforcing a “no texting” policy? Public altercations with students that erode the climate for learning in the classroom? But texting itself erodes the learning atmosphere of classroom, doesn’t it? 
What about taking the “if-you-can’t-beat-them-join-them” approach?
Does texting show a lack of respect? Perhaps, but are students doing it because they want to disrespect the teacher?
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Tough Questions on Texting in the Classroom

image via flickr:CC | Stitch

  • Does it make sense to ban texting if students ignore the ban and teachers back away from enforcing it? Can a ban be enforced? How about in a large course, can it be enforced then? Should it be enforced?  What are the costs of enforcing a “no texting” policy? Public altercations with students that erode the climate for learning in the classroom? But texting itself erodes the learning atmosphere of classroom, doesn’t it?
  • What about taking the “if-you-can’t-beat-them-join-them” approach?
  • Does texting show a lack of respect? Perhaps, but are students doing it because they want to disrespect the teacher?
kqedscience:

Yes, Your Cell Phone Conversation Does Drive People MadIt’s well known that talking on your cell phone compromises your ability to perform simple tasks like walking and driving. Now it turns out cell phones impact cognition in bystanders as well: listening to another person talk on their cell phone isn’t just incredibly annoying, it also interferes with your memory and concentration.Learn more from Liza Gross in today’s blog post.
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kqedscience:

Yes, Your Cell Phone Conversation Does Drive People Mad

It’s well known that talking on your cell phone compromises your ability to perform simple tasks like walking and driving. Now it turns out cell phones impact cognition in bystanders as well: listening to another person talk on their cell phone isn’t just incredibly annoying, it also interferes with your memory and concentration.

Learn more from Liza Gross in today’s blog post.

pewinternet staticizes:

TEENS HAVE GONE MOBILE.
Check these stats:
78% of teens now have a cell phone, and almost half (47%) of them own smartphones. That translates into 37% of all teens who have smartphones, up from just 23% in 2011.
23% of teens have a tablet computer, a level comparable to the general adult population.
95% of teens use the internet.
93% of teens have a computer or have access to one at home.
AND - 1 in 4 teens are “cell-mostly” internet users, who say they mostly go online using their phone and not using some other device such as a desktop or laptop computer.
More: http://pewrsr.ch/ZmwgLG

pewinternet staticizes:

TEENS HAVE GONE MOBILE.

Check these stats:

  • 78% of teens now have a cell phone, and almost half (47%) of them own smartphones. That translates into 37% of all teens who have smartphones, up from just 23% in 2011.
  • 23% of teens have a tablet computer, a level comparable to the general adult population.
  • 95% of teens use the internet.
  • 93% of teens have a computer or have access to one at home.

AND - 1 in 4 teens are “cell-mostly” internet users, who say they mostly go online using their phone and not using some other device such as a desktop or laptop computer.

More: http://pewrsr.ch/ZmwgLG