mobile

Showing 61 posts tagged mobile

Tailored ‘activity coaching’ by smartphone

Today’s smartphone user can obtain a lot of data about his or her health, thanks to built-in or separate sensors. Researchers now take this health monitoring to a higher level. Using the system he developed, the smartphone also acts as an ‘activity coach’: it advices the user to walk or take a rest. In what way the user wants to be addressed, is typically something the system learns by itself.
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Tailored ‘activity coaching’ by smartphone

Today’s smartphone user can obtain a lot of data about his or her health, thanks to built-in or separate sensors. Researchers now take this health monitoring to a higher level. Using the system he developed, the smartphone also acts as an ‘activity coach’: it advices the user to walk or take a rest. In what way the user wants to be addressed, is typically something the system learns by itself.

'R U on Track for College?' Texting a New Strategy

As educators look for ways to keep high school seniors on track for college and to avoid the “summer melt” that leads some astray in the months after they graduate, a new strategy is gaining ground: texting.
This year, West Virginia launched a pilot program that alerts students about deadlines for financial aid, registration, and student orientation, among other matters, with personalized messages on their mobile phones. The texting initiative targets students from low-income families—especially those set to become the first in their families to attend college.
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'R U on Track for College?' Texting a New Strategy

As educators look for ways to keep high school seniors on track for college and to avoid the “summer melt” that leads some astray in the months after they graduate, a new strategy is gaining ground: texting.

This year, West Virginia launched a pilot program that alerts students about deadlines for financial aid, registration, and student orientation, among other matters, with personalized messages on their mobile phones. The texting initiative targets students from low-income families—especially those set to become the first in their families to attend college.

It’s More than Just a Phone.

While facilitating a conversation around the use of technology in schools, a student participant pulled out his phone and asked the adults in the conversation what they saw.
"Your phone," they all answered simultaneously.
The student’s response:  ”That’s where you’re wrong.  You see this as my phone.  I see it as my learning device.  And when you take it away from me when I walk in the door, you lose me as a learner.”
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It’s More than Just a Phone.

While facilitating a conversation around the use of technology in schools, a student participant pulled out his phone and asked the adults in the conversation what they saw.

"Your phone," they all answered simultaneously.

The student’s response:  ”That’s where you’re wrong.  You see this as my phone.  I see it as my learning device.  And when you take it away from me when I walk in the door, you lose me as a learner.”

theatlantic:

Can Cell Phones Stop Crime in the World’s Murder Capitals?

GUATEMALA CITY—In the last three months, Guatemala has witnessed 356 homicides, 202 armed attacks, 44 illegal drug sales, 11 kidnappings, and six cases of “extortion by cell phone.”
These numbers come courtesy not of Guatemalan law-enforcement but of Alertos.org, a new platform that recruits citizens to report crimes. And they’ve enlisted in the effort, using email, Twitter, Facebook, mobile apps, and text messaging to chronicle thousands of criminal activities since last year—in a country where a hobbled police force is struggling to address the fifth-highest murder rate in the world.
In recent years, police have courted cell phone-toting citizens as crime “censors” everywhere from Washington, D.C. to the tiny Kenyan village of Lanet Umoja. But the practice has gained particular traction in Latin America, which, as the UN reported in April, has the highest rate of criminal violence on the planet (the region accounts for 8 percent of the world’s population and a third of its murders). The criminal syndicates and drug cartels behind this bloodshed have overwhelmed, crippled, and corrupted national police forces, resulting in the highest levels of impunity in the world as well. In these countries, criminals literally get away with murder, again and again. Amateur crime-mapping has emerged as a parallel law-enforcement mechanism—in part owing to the popularity of cell phones in the region.
Read more. [Image: Alertos.org]

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theatlantic:

Can Cell Phones Stop Crime in the World’s Murder Capitals?

GUATEMALA CITY—In the last three months, Guatemala has witnessed 356 homicides, 202 armed attacks, 44 illegal drug sales, 11 kidnappings, and six cases of “extortion by cell phone.”

These numbers come courtesy not of Guatemalan law-enforcement but of Alertos.org, a new platform that recruits citizens to report crimes. And they’ve enlisted in the effort, using email, Twitter, Facebook, mobile apps, and text messaging to chronicle thousands of criminal activities since last year—in a country where a hobbled police force is struggling to address the fifth-highest murder rate in the world.

In recent years, police have courted cell phone-toting citizens as crime “censors” everywhere from Washington, D.C. to the tiny Kenyan village of Lanet Umoja. But the practice has gained particular traction in Latin America, which, as the UN reported in April, has the highest rate of criminal violence on the planet (the region accounts for 8 percent of the world’s population and a third of its murders). The criminal syndicates and drug cartels behind this bloodshed have overwhelmed, crippled, and corrupted national police forces, resulting in the highest levels of impunity in the world as well. In these countries, criminals literally get away with murder, again and again. Amateur crime-mapping has emerged as a parallel law-enforcement mechanism—in part owing to the popularity of cell phones in the region.

Read more. [Image: Alertos.org]

Study: College students aren’t embracing tablets like experts expected

College students are not embracing tablets as many experts had expected when the devices were introduced a few years ago, says a new report from Ball State University.
About 29 percent of students report owning a tablet in 2014, a slight decline since 2012, said Michael Hanley, an advertising professor and director of Ball State’s Institute for Mobile Media Research. He has conducted surveys on the use of mobile devices by students since 2004.

image via flickr:CC | Merrill College of Journalism Press Releases

Study: College students aren’t embracing tablets like experts expected

College students are not embracing tablets as many experts had expected when the devices were introduced a few years ago, says a new report from Ball State University.

About 29 percent of students report owning a tablet in 2014, a slight decline since 2012, said Michael Hanley, an advertising professor and director of Ball State’s Institute for Mobile Media Research. He has conducted surveys on the use of mobile devices by students since 2004.

image via flickr:CC | Merrill College of Journalism Press Releases

theatlantic:

What the Shift to Mobile Means for Blind News Consumers

If a website is designed haphazardly, it doesn’t only look out of control. The user experience can be just as messy for someone who can’t see.
"News apps are just completely frustrating," said Christopher Danielsen, spokesman for the National Federation of the Blind. ”Blind people, the way we deal with this, is we share information about what apps tend to work, so I don’t tend to download something unless I have a pretty good sense that I’m going to be able to deal with it.” 
The problem with much of the web—and, in particular, its newsier corners—is that it’s designed without consideration for people who aren’t navigating by sight. In many cases, the busier a website looks, the harder it is for people who use tools like audio screen-readers to get where they want to go, or even figure out where to go in the first place.
But Danielsen says design for accessibility is getting much better, albeit largely by accident. “The mobile world is taking over where the web used to be dominant,” he told me. “For blind people as well as for sighted people in many cases, that’s a good thing.”
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

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theatlantic:

What the Shift to Mobile Means for Blind News Consumers

If a website is designed haphazardly, it doesn’t only look out of control. The user experience can be just as messy for someone who can’t see.

"News apps are just completely frustrating," said Christopher Danielsen, spokesman for the National Federation of the Blind. ”Blind people, the way we deal with this, is we share information about what apps tend to work, so I don’t tend to download something unless I have a pretty good sense that I’m going to be able to deal with it.” 

The problem with much of the web—and, in particular, its newsier corners—is that it’s designed without consideration for people who aren’t navigating by sight. In many cases, the busier a website looks, the harder it is for people who use tools like audio screen-readers to get where they want to go, or even figure out where to go in the first place.

But Danielsen says design for accessibility is getting much better, albeit largely by accident. “The mobile world is taking over where the web used to be dominant,” he told me. “For blind people as well as for sighted people in many cases, that’s a good thing.”

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

Curriki Geometry Goes Mobile

This month Curriki revamped their geometry site to accommodate viewing on mobile phones, iPads, and Android tablets. Curriki’s geometry course features six PBL projects. Each of the projects is aligned to Common Core Standards. The course is not a self-directed course for students. The course is designed to be taught by mathematics teachers who want to incorporate PBL.
High-res

Curriki Geometry Goes Mobile

This month Curriki revamped their geometry site to accommodate viewing on mobile phones, iPads, and Android tablets.

Curriki’s geometry course features six PBL projects. Each of the projects is aligned to Common Core Standards. The course is not a self-directed course for students. The course is designed to be taught by mathematics teachers who want to incorporate PBL.