internet

Showing 267 posts tagged internet

This Little-Known iOS Feature Will Change the Way We Connect | Gadget Lab | WIRED

futurejournalismproject:

If “Multipeer Connectivity Framework” and “mesh networking” sound like complicated technologies from the future, it’s because they kind of are (from the future!!! okay, kidding). But they’re not as complicated as they may sound. The app developers behind the new Firechat are harnessing this new technology from Apple to allow iOS device users to find and connect to one another - and then anonymously communicate - all without needing cellular service or WiFi. 

There are numerous reasons this technology could have huge, revolutionary impacts if its successful. While Firechat is now just for exchanging messages and photos, mesh networking could open up the possibilities of a completely independent network for communicating anonymously and privately, sharing files and storing data, and even reaching out from places with limited internet access (think crisis areas, crowded conventions). The implications from this technology would completely disrupt the current cellular service provider system. 

We will eventually be able to interact via thoughts, but it won’t be common by 2025. However, verbal interaction will be commonplace. We will talk to devices in essentially the same way we talk to other people. Yes, you will be permanently connected to the network via wearable devices. You will interact with these devices mostly by voice, as you would interact with another person. Centuries ago, rich people had servants, and in the future, we will all have cyberservants.

Hal Varian, chief economist for Google, on the future of the Internet of Things.

Will we all have cyberservants?

(via pewinternet)

Breaking: FCC approves plan to allow for paid priority on Internet

policymic:

The Federal Communications Commission on Thursday voted in favor of advancing a proposal that would dramatically reshape the way consumers experience the Internet, opening the possibility of Internet service providers charging Web sites for higher-quality delivery of their content to American consumers.

Note that this is advancing the proposal and not a firm ruling yet.

pewinternet quotes:

"Finally, the refrigerator will talk to my smartphone to tell it I need to order milk before I am out."

Many experts say the rise of embedded and wearable computing (the “Internet of Things”) will bring the next revolution in digital technology. The upsides: enhanced health, convenience, productivity; The downsides: challenges to personal privacy, over-hyped expectations, and boggling tech complexity.

We’ve got a NEW REPORT today that reveals tech experts’ predictions for the future of the internetification of everything, and what it will mean for life. http://pewrsr.ch/1k0Y84z 

Your thoughts on the internetification of life?

kateoplis defends:

“The future of the Internet — which means the future of communications, culture, free speech and innovation — is up for grabs.
The Federal Communications Commission is making decisions that may determine how open the Internet will be, who will profit most from it and whether start-ups will face new barriers that will make it harder for ideas to flourish.
Tim Wu, 41, a law professor at Columbia University, isn’t a direct participant in the rule making, but he is influencing it. A dozen years ago, building on the work of more senior scholars, Mr. Wu developed a concept that is now a generally accepted norm. Called “net neutrality,” short for network neutrality, it is essentially this:
The cable and telephone companies that control important parts of the plumbing of the Internet shouldn’t restrict how the rest of us use it.”
“What makes the current debate so contentious is that the F.C.C. has signaled its intention to grant cable and telephone companies the right to charge content companies like Netflix, Google, Yahoo or Facebook for speeding up transmissions to people’s homes. And this is happening as the F.C.C. is considering whether to bless the merger of Comcast and Time Warner Cable, which could put a single company in control of the Internet pipes into 40 percent of American homes.”
Read on: Defending an Open Internet
High-res

kateoplis defends:

The future of the Internet — which means the future of communications, culture, free speech and innovation — is up for grabs.

The Federal Communications Commission is making decisions that may determine how open the Internet will be, who will profit most from it and whether start-ups will face new barriers that will make it harder for ideas to flourish.

Tim Wu, 41, a law professor at Columbia University, isn’t a direct participant in the rule making, but he is influencing it. A dozen years ago, building on the work of more senior scholars, Mr. Wu developed a concept that is now a generally accepted norm. Called “net neutrality,” short for network neutrality, it is essentially this:

The cable and telephone companies that control important parts of the plumbing of the Internet shouldn’t restrict how the rest of us use it.

“What makes the current debate so contentious is that the F.C.C. has signaled its intention to grant cable and telephone companies the right to charge content companies like Netflix, Google, Yahoo or Facebook for speeding up transmissions to people’s homes. And this is happening as the F.C.C. is considering whether to bless the merger of Comcast and Time Warner Cable, which could put a single company in control of the Internet pipes into 40 percent of American homes.”

Read on: Defending an Open Internet

kenyatta:

everybodyatonce:

kenyatta spoke at tribecafilm institute’s Interactive day a couple of weeks back, where he explained the link between hip hop and internet memes, how Chinese fans of Sherlock are making new episodes by pairing old footage with fanfic, and how the future of filmmaking could look more like the officialmoamt project than traditional Hollywood.

The Audience Has An Audience: Kenyatta Cheese at 2014 TFI Interactive

For this year’s TFI Interactive opening keynote we were thrilled to have Kenyatta Cheese deliver a passionate presentation on how the audience has an audience. Which in essence means that with our obsession as a culture to tweet, share and blog anything and everything we are becoming a community of people changing the ways stories are being told through our own communal interests.

See an edited version of Cheese’s keynote above.

I said a thing

When the cost of collecting information on virtually every interaction falls to zero, the insights that we gain from our activity, in the context of the activity of others, will fundamentally change the way we relate to one another, to institutions, and with the future itself. We will become far more knowledgeable about the consequences of our actions; we will edit our behavior more quickly and intelligently.

Patrick Tucker, author of The Naked Future: What Happens In a World That Anticipates Your Every Move?, on what digital life will be like in 2025. (via pewinternet)