interactive

Showing 76 posts tagged interactive

Most with college STEM degrees go to work in other fields

People with bachelor’s degrees in science, technology, engineering and math are more likely than other college graduates to have a job, but most of them don’t work in STEM occupations, according to a U.S. Census Bureau report released Thursday. 
Nearly 75 percent of all holders of bachelor’s degrees in STEM disciplines don’t have jobs in STEM occupations, according to a survey that reached 3.5 million homes, said Liana Christin Landivar, a sociologist with the Census Bureau. The bureau’s American Community Survey is the largest household survey in the nation. 
 About half of those who have degrees related to engineering, computers, math and statistics do get a STEM job, the survey found.

Check out the Census Bureau’s interactive tool High-res

Most with college STEM degrees go to work in other fields

People with bachelor’s degrees in science, technology, engineering and math are more likely than other college graduates to have a job, but most of them don’t work in STEM occupations, according to a U.S. Census Bureau report released Thursday.

Nearly 75 percent of all holders of bachelor’s degrees in STEM disciplines don’t have jobs in STEM occupations, according to a survey that reached 3.5 million homes, said Liana Christin Landivar, a sociologist with the Census Bureau. The bureau’s American Community Survey is the largest household survey in the nation.

About half of those who have degrees related to engineering, computers, math and statistics do get a STEM job, the survey found.

Check out the Census Bureau’s interactive tool

U.S. Students from Educated Families Lag in International Tests

When viewed from a global perspective, U.S. schools seem to do as badly teaching those from better-educated families as they do teaching those from less well educated families. Overall, the U.S. proficiency rate in math (35 percent) places the country at the 27th rank among the 34 OECD countries that participated in the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA). That ranking is somewhat lower for students from advantaged backgrounds (28th) than for those from disadvantaged ones (20th).

Interactive Map High-res

U.S. Students from Educated Families Lag in International Tests

When viewed from a global perspective, U.S. schools seem to do as badly teaching those from better-educated families as they do teaching those from less well educated families. Overall, the U.S. proficiency rate in math (35 percent) places the country at the 27th rank among the 34 OECD countries that participated in the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA). That ranking is somewhat lower for students from advantaged backgrounds (28th) than for those from disadvantaged ones (20th).

Interactive Map

Find Science Lesson Plans, Videos, and Animations on BioInteractive

HHMI’s BioInteractive is a good place for science teachers to search for science lesson plans, videos, animations, and slideshows to use with students.

The resources available through HHMI’s BioInteractive appears to be best suited for high school settings. The “click and learn” activities available on BioInteractive could be good to assign to students to view as homework prior to a lesson on the topic.

Do you live, or work, in a Super Zip?

Super Zips are “the country’s most prosperous, highly educated demographic clusters. On average, they have a median household income of $120,000, and 7 in 10 adults have college degrees.” This fascinating map from the Washington Post reveals how “it’s possible to live in a Super Zip and rarely encounter others without college degrees or professional jobs.” That’s problematic because “the trend is isolating well-to-do Americans from the problems of the poor and the working poor.”
High-res

Do you live, or work, in a Super Zip?

Super Zips are “the country’s most prosperous, highly educated demographic clusters. On average, they have a median household income of $120,000, and 7 in 10 adults have college degrees.” This fascinating map from the Washington Post reveals how “it’s possible to live in a Super Zip and rarely encounter others without college degrees or professional jobs.” That’s problematic because “the trend is isolating well-to-do Americans from the problems of the poor and the working poor.”

The SAMR Ladder Through the Lens of 21st Century Skills

I have created an interactive graphic of the SAMR Ladder to illustrate the big picture. The image includes a sample of a vocabulary centered wiki project at each level of SAMR. The Ladder includes questions designed by Dr. Ruben R. Puentedura, Ph.D. for reflection about making the transition to the next level. The circle at each level targets research, writing and digital citizenship. There you will find a quick suggestion about ways to capture and embrace the natural progression of skills at each level.
High-res

The SAMR Ladder Through the Lens of 21st Century Skills

I have created an interactive graphic of the SAMR Ladder to illustrate the big picture. The image includes a sample of a vocabulary centered wiki project at each level of SAMR. The Ladder includes questions designed by Dr. Ruben R. Puentedura, Ph.D. for reflection about making the transition to the next level. The circle at each level targets research, writing and digital citizenship. There you will find a quick suggestion about ways to capture and embrace the natural progression of skills at each level.

Girls Lead in Science Exam, but Not in the United States

Researchers have been searching for ways to explain why there are so many more men than women in the top ranks of science. 
Now comes an intriguing clue, in the form of a test given in 65 developed countries by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. It finds that among a representative sample of 15-year-olds around the world, girls generally outperform boys in science — but not in the United States. 
High-res

Girls Lead in Science Exam, but Not in the United States

Researchers have been searching for ways to explain why there are so many more men than women in the top ranks of science.

Now comes an intriguing clue, in the form of a test given in 65 developed countries by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. It finds that among a representative sample of 15-year-olds around the world, girls generally outperform boys in science — but not in the United States.