inspire

Showing 646 posts tagged inspire

Teacher raises nearly $80,000 to feed Ferguson kids who can’t get meals at shuttered schools

A teacher in North Carolina has raised nearly $80,000 to feed students from low-income families in Ferguson, Mo., who would ordinarily be getting free lunches at public schools in the St. Louis suburb but can’t because the start of the 2014-15 school year has been delayed twice as a result of civil unrest.
Wishing to help the students in Ferguson, Julianna Mendelsohn, a fifth-grade teacher in Bahama, N.C., came up with the idea of starting a fund on the Internet to raise money so that the St. Louis Area Foodbank could feed students and their families, according to takepart.com. She started a fundraising campaign on Fundly.com that has raised nearly $80,000, which had been her goal.
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Teacher raises nearly $80,000 to feed Ferguson kids who can’t get meals at shuttered schools

A teacher in North Carolina has raised nearly $80,000 to feed students from low-income families in Ferguson, Mo., who would ordinarily be getting free lunches at public schools in the St. Louis suburb but can’t because the start of the 2014-15 school year has been delayed twice as a result of civil unrest.

Wishing to help the students in Ferguson, Julianna Mendelsohn, a fifth-grade teacher in Bahama, N.C., came up with the idea of starting a fund on the Internet to raise money so that the St. Louis Area Foodbank could feed students and their families, according to takepart.com. She started a fundraising campaign on Fundly.com that has raised nearly $80,000, which had been her goal.

Mastering the Teaching Game

Coach Groeneveld’s eight principles are the essence of powerful teaching. The teacher walks into a classroom and accepts the reality that the only way to reach students is to know them as individuals. After that, by unfolding layers to access students’ core, the shared goal setting ensues. The teacher knows the content well and can teach “mechanics” in a way that compels attention. But the instructor also realizes that until the young student thinks like a successful student, the mechanics will fall short. And so the educator — the learning architect — assiduously teaches each individual to take responsibility for his or her own game or learning plan. Each success empowers the next success. And these successes belong to the child. Teaching itself is reward enough.

image via flickr:CC | jacqui.brown33 High-res

Mastering the Teaching Game

Coach Groeneveld’s eight principles are the essence of powerful teaching. The teacher walks into a classroom and accepts the reality that the only way to reach students is to know them as individuals. After that, by unfolding layers to access students’ core, the shared goal setting ensues. The teacher knows the content well and can teach “mechanics” in a way that compels attention. But the instructor also realizes that until the young student thinks like a successful student, the mechanics will fall short. And so the educator — the learning architect — assiduously teaches each individual to take responsibility for his or her own game or learning plan. Each success empowers the next success. And these successes belong to the child. Teaching itself is reward enough.

image via flickr:CC | jacqui.brown33

What is your ‘What if?’

Jeff Charbonneau was named 2013 National Teacher of the Year for a reason. The man gets involved. In his small school in Zillah, Washington, a community of only 3,000 people, Charbonneau wears many hats. He’s the high school chemistry teacher. He’s also the yearbook teacher and the assistant drama teacher. He used to be the assistant baseball coach. He even serves as an adjunct professor at three universities.

Despite the wide variety of Charbonneau’s many passion projects, they all began with the same question: “What if?” What if we could teach differently and embrace curiosity in our students? What if we allowed them to dig in the mud more and get their fingernails dirty?

Nothing different will happen with your students until something different happens for your first. Hopefully the “why” and “how” will become the common question starter for our students, as opposed to “may I”, no matter the language.

George Couros - May I…?