grading

Showing 45 posts tagged grading

Do Cumulative Exams Motivate Students?

Women should embrace the B’s in college to make more later

The college majors that tend to lead to the most profitable professions are also the stingiest about awarding A’s. Science departments grade, on a four-point scale, an average of 0.4 points lower than humanities departments, according to a 2010 analysis of national grading data by Stuart Rojstaczer and Christopher Healy. And two new research studies suggest that women might be abandoning these lucrative disciplines precisely because they’re terrified of getting B’s.
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Women should embrace the B’s in college to make more later

The college majors that tend to lead to the most profitable professions are also the stingiest about awarding A’s. Science departments grade, on a four-point scale, an average of 0.4 points lower than humanities departments, according to a 2010 analysis of national grading data by Stuart Rojstaczer and Christopher Healy. And two new research studies suggest that women might be abandoning these lucrative disciplines precisely because they’re terrified of getting B’s.

The National Council on Teacher Quality has released its 2013 State Teacher Policy Yearbook National Summary. This year’s average was a C-, up from D+ in 2011 and D in 2009.
Over the past five years, 37 states have improved their overall grades by at least one full grade level because of significant reform, particularly in the areas of teacher evaluation and related teacher effectiveness policies.

Click on a state for detailed information about that state’s teacher policies or explore the results of the 2013 Yearbook further in the State Yearbook Dashboard.

Digital Badges Bust Out of School-Defined Learning

Damian Ewens sits in his snazzy office at BetaSpring, a Providence business incubator.  He’s mother hen to Achievery, a business that provides a platform for building “digital badge” systems.And they are?  Well, they’re basically a high-tech version of Boy Scout badges, certifying that the young man sporting one of the iconic patches on his sash actually knows something about knot-tying, canoeing or cooking over a campfire.  The Scout manual explains what skills that badge certifies and the criteria for getting one.Okay, but a “digital” badge?
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Digital Badges Bust Out of School-Defined Learning

Damian Ewens sits in his snazzy office at BetaSpring, a Providence business incubator.  He’s mother hen to Achievery, a business that provides a platform for building “digital badge” systems.

And they are?  Well, they’re basically a high-tech version of Boy Scout badges, certifying that the young man sporting one of the iconic patches on his sash actually knows something about knot-tying, canoeing or cooking over a campfire.  The Scout manual explains what skills that badge certifies and the criteria for getting one.

Okay, but a “digital” badge?

“Keep Your 3, I Want My A”: What’s Up With Standards-Based Grading?

Many schools use a 1-4 scale to indicate not enough evidence, not yet proficient, proficient, or exceeding proficiency. Parents and students may think this is just the same as A-D, but it’s not. Designing a grading strategy and communicating it effectively is an important step in reshaping the culture of schools and districts.

Much of the grading controversy is driven by college admissions. That’s slowly changing. Last week, 48 New England colleges announced that they would be accepting proficiency-based diplomas.  While we’re waiting for higher ed to change,school districts will need to provide translations that give their graduates a shot at selective schools.
 Report cards that provide standards-based feedback need to be simple to produce and easy to understand–and 20 years after our first attempt, it’s still harder than it should be.

“Keep Your 3, I Want My A”: What’s Up With Standards-Based Grading?

Many schools use a 1-4 scale to indicate not enough evidence, not yet proficient, proficient, or exceeding proficiency. Parents and students may think this is just the same as A-D, but it’s not. Designing a grading strategy and communicating it effectively is an important step in reshaping the culture of schools and districts.

Much of the grading controversy is driven by college admissions. That’s slowly changing. Last week, 48 New England colleges announced that they would be accepting proficiency-based diplomas.  While we’re waiting for higher ed to change,school districts will need to provide translations that give their graduates a shot at selective schools.

Report cards that provide standards-based feedback need to be simple to produce and easy to understand–and 20 years after our first attempt, it’s still harder than it should be.

Learning from Mistakes: A Different Approach to Partial Credit

Milwaukee Public Schools makes shift away from letter grades for K-8