google

Showing 212 posts tagged google

jtotheizzoe puzzles:

To celebrate the puzzle’s 40th anniversary, today’s Google Doodle is a fully-functional Rubik’s Cube! If you had a cube for every possible arrangement of the 54 colored squares, and you laid them end-to-end, those 43,252,003,274,489,856,000 cubes would extend 261 light years.
But no single Rubik’s cube can be configured to all of those Rubik’s universes.
If the traditional cube isn’t challenging enough for you, you can head over to the Chrome Cube Lab and try your digital hand at some other cubic puzzles.
The folks at Numberphile took an in-depth look at the math behind a Rubik’s Cube in a series of videos on YouTube. Here’s one of them: 

jtotheizzoe puzzles:

To celebrate the puzzle’s 40th anniversary, today’s Google Doodle is a fully-functional Rubik’s Cube! If you had a cube for every possible arrangement of the 54 colored squares, and you laid them end-to-end, those 43,252,003,274,489,856,000 cubes would extend 261 light years.

But no single Rubik’s cube can be configured to all of those Rubik’s universes.

If the traditional cube isn’t challenging enough for you, you can head over to the Chrome Cube Lab and try your digital hand at some other cubic puzzles.

The folks at Numberphile took an in-depth look at the math behind a Rubik’s Cube in a series of videos on YouTube. Here’s one of them: 

Google Debuts Classroom, An Education Platform For Teacher-Student Communication

Google is tackling the persistent need in education for better software with Classroom, a new tool launching in beta preview to help teachers make, collect and track student assignments, and to help them better communicate with their classes.

The Classroom app is part of Google’s Apps for Education lineup of products, and it uses Docs, Drive and Gmail to make assignment creation and tracking easier than when you’d do those things manually. Basically, Google has taken a process that many were already using and streamlined it to make it more useful. Google has a huge advantage over other startups trying to do the same as a result; there’s an immense built-in existing population of users to get onboard.

A Decade Later: How Gmail Happened

parislemon:

Harry McCracken:

In the end, Gmail ended up running on three hundred old Pentium III computers nobody else at Google wanted. That was sufficient for the limited beta rollout the company planned, which involved giving accounts to a thousand outsiders, allowing them to invite a couple of friends apiece, and growing slowly from there.

As much as I rag on email, it’s hard to imagine a world without Gmail. Actually, it’s terrifying. We’d still be using email, but it would probably look like this.

thisistheverge catches:

Google Maps is overrun with Pokémon for April Fools’, and you can catch ‘em all
Google has been experimenting with augmented reality for a few years now, but never in such an ambitious way as it’s announcing today… sort of. For April Fools’ Day this year, Google has created a video advertising an augmented reality Pokémon game loosely tied into Google Maps. In Google’s vision, players would hold their smartphones out in front of them and see Nintendo’s cartoon creatures appear on screen before them, often ready to do battle.
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thisistheverge catches:

Google Maps is overrun with Pokémon for April Fools’, and you can catch ‘em all

Google has been experimenting with augmented reality for a few years now, but never in such an ambitious way as it’s announcing today… sort of. For April Fools’ Day this year, Google has created a video advertising an augmented reality Pokémon game loosely tied into Google Maps. In Google’s vision, players would hold their smartphones out in front of them and see Nintendo’s cartoon creatures appear on screen before them, often ready to do battle.

shortformblog:

fastcodesign:

Google Just Turned Gmail Into Pinterest
Gmail’s new-ish tabbed inbox offers the mechanized convenience of sorting all of your solicitations—your Groupons and Gap coupons—into one pile away from your more important email. Right now, that pile—called the Promotions Tab—looks like any other tower of email. But in a new Gmail update, Google has transformed the design from list to Pinterest, with a grid of minimal white cards driven by prominent photos (along with a corporate logo, one-line summary, and the option to star or trash the deal).
More> Co.Design

Wow, that’s actually a good idea. 
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shortformblog:

fastcodesign:

Google Just Turned Gmail Into Pinterest

Gmail’s new-ish tabbed inbox offers the mechanized convenience of sorting all of your solicitations—your Groupons and Gap coupons—into one pile away from your more important email. Right now, that pile—called the Promotions Tab—looks like any other tower of email. But in a new Gmail update, Google has transformed the design from list to Pinterest, with a grid of minimal white cards driven by prominent photos (along with a corporate logo, one-line summary, and the option to star or trash the deal).

More> Co.Design

Wow, that’s actually a good idea. 

Google faces lawsuit over email scanning and student data

How is Google Changing Our Memory?

Before: Without internet access, we had to do a lot of legwork to find the information we were looking for. We then found ways to memorize and remember the things we needed to know. The next time we needed to remember that information, we were likely to remember it because we took the time to research it and use mental devices (like visual memory, mneumonic devices, etc) to remember it.Now: When we need to know something, we turn to our trusty computers and look it up. Since the information is so readily available, we don’t often take the time to encode the information into our brains. So the next time we need to remember that information, it is likely that we’ll need to look it up again.
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How is Google Changing Our Memory?

Before: Without internet access, we had to do a lot of legwork to find the information we were looking for. We then found ways to memorize and remember the things we needed to know. The next time we needed to remember that information, we were likely to remember it because we took the time to research it and use mental devices (like visual memory, mneumonic devices, etc) to remember it.

Now: When we need to know something, we turn to our trusty computers and look it up. Since the information is so readily available, we don’t often take the time to encode the information into our brains. So the next time we need to remember that information, it is likely that we’ll need to look it up again.

futurejournalismproject creeps:

Google’s Lie-Detecting Neck Tat
Google patented a neck tattoo that can function both as a mobile-device microphone and a lie detector. 
According to the patent document, we need this quirky invention because it could “reasonably improve” communication; the throat tattoo could dampen “acoustic noise” — which would make it easier to communicate in loud environments. 
The lie detector or “galvanic skin response detector,” would assess the amount of sweat or “skin resistance” a person has, which would allow the tattoo to determine if he or she is “nervous or engaging in speaking falsehoods.” When the person is lying, their tattoo will light up to let everyone in the room know.
Crazyyyyy.
The Atlantic:

Some caveats:
1) This is just a patent. Patents rarely become products. Most are worthless. Etc.
2) Though it is called a tattoo, the device is really more of a sticker applied with an adhesive. 
2a) Which is a good thing because everyone hates an obsolescent tattoo (see: tribal bands, frat letters, ex-spouses).
3) Other researchers are working on similar “tattoos,” but for different applications, mostly biomedical sensors. 
4) It’s not just for humans! “Here it is contemplated that the electronic tattoo can also be applied to an animal as well. Audio circuitry can also include a microphone for emitting sound corresponding to fluctuations of muscle or tissue in the throat.”


Image: The Atlantic
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futurejournalismproject creeps:

Google’s Lie-Detecting Neck Tat

Google patented a neck tattoo that can function both as a mobile-device microphone and a lie detector. 

According to the patent document, we need this quirky invention because it could “reasonably improve” communication; the throat tattoo could dampen “acoustic noise” — which would make it easier to communicate in loud environments. 

The lie detector or “galvanic skin response detector,” would assess the amount of sweat or “skin resistance” a person has, which would allow the tattoo to determine if he or she is “nervous or engaging in speaking falsehoods.” When the person is lying, their tattoo will light up to let everyone in the room know.

Crazyyyyy.

The Atlantic:

Some caveats:

1) This is just a patent. Patents rarely become products. Most are worthless. Etc.

2) Though it is called a tattoo, the device is really more of a sticker applied with an adhesive. 

2a) Which is a good thing because everyone hates an obsolescent tattoo (see: tribal bands, frat letters, ex-spouses).

3) Other researchers are working on similar “tattoos,” but for different applications, mostly biomedical sensors

4) It’s not just for humans! “Here it is contemplated that the electronic tattoo can also be applied to an animal as well. Audio circuitry can also include a microphone for emitting sound corresponding to fluctuations of muscle or tissue in the throat.”

Image: The Atlantic