future

Showing 157 posts tagged future

Implants and wearables will replace tools we carry or purchase. Technology will be biological in the sense that those who can afford it will ‘receive’ it as children. It will be part of our body and our minds will not function well without it. We will be dependent on it. There will probably be new forms of addiction and theft. It will also redefine what a ‘thought’ is, as we won’t ‘think’ unassisted.

Karen Landis, Killer Apps In The Gigabit Age 

(via stoweboyd)

thisistheverge drives:

Mercedes built a self-driving truck that could save thousands of lives every year
Using a combination of advanced dual cameras, radar sensors, and the latest blind-spot technology (Mercedes refers to the system as “Highway Pilot”), the Future Truck 2025 analyzes the road to get a sense of surrounding traffic and terrain. The “highway” part of that is critical; a driver is still required to get the truck onto the interstate and successfully merge into traffic.
High-res

thisistheverge drives:

Mercedes built a self-driving truck that could save thousands of lives every year

Using a combination of advanced dual cameras, radar sensors, and the latest blind-spot technology (Mercedes refers to the system as “Highway Pilot”), the Future Truck 2025 analyzes the road to get a sense of surrounding traffic and terrain. The “highway” part of that is critical; a driver is still required to get the truck onto the interstate and successfully merge into traffic.

Reflected smartphone transmissions enable gesture control

With almost all of the U.S. population armed with cellphones — and close to 80 percent carrying a smartphone — mobile phones have become second-nature for most people.What’s coming next, say University of Washington researchers, is the ability to interact with our devices not just with touchscreens, but through gestures in the space around the phone. Some smartphones are starting to incorporate 3-D gesture sensing based on cameras, for example, but cameras consume significant battery power and require a clear view of the user’s hands.UW engineers have developed a new form of low-power wireless sensing technology that could soon contribute to this growing field by letting users “train” their smartphones to recognize and respond to specific hand gestures near the phone.

Gif/Video source

Reflected smartphone transmissions enable gesture control

With almost all of the U.S. population armed with cellphones — and close to 80 percent carrying a smartphone — mobile phones have become second-nature for most people.

What’s coming next, say University of Washington researchers, is the ability to interact with our devices not just with touchscreens, but through gestures in the space around the phone. Some smartphones are starting to incorporate 3-D gesture sensing based on cameras, for example, but cameras consume significant battery power and require a clear view of the user’s hands.

UW engineers have developed a new form of low-power wireless sensing technology that could soon contribute to this growing field by letting users “train” their smartphones to recognize and respond to specific hand gestures near the phone.

Gif/Video source

Scientists Use Internet For Brain-To-Brain Communication

Ah, the internet. It lets us do so many things: from ordering pizza to browsing endless cat pictures and now… telepathy?
A study by a group of international scientists published in PLOS One found a brain could transmit a message to another brain through internet channels, and as if that weren’t enough — they did it across continents.

Scientists Use Internet For Brain-To-Brain Communication

Ah, the internet. It lets us do so many things: from ordering pizza to browsing endless cat pictures and now… telepathy?

A study by a group of international scientists published in PLOS One found a brain could transmit a message to another brain through internet channels, and as if that weren’t enough — they did it across continents.

futurescope:

Fraunhofer IIS presents world’s first emotion detection app on Google Glass

The Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits IIS has adapted its SHORE™ real-time face detection and analysis software to work with Google Glass:

Fraunhofer IIS presents a real-time* face tracker on Google Glass that can read people’s emotions. At the same time it also estimates age and gender of persons in front of Glass’ camera. Privacy is important: everything happens inside Glass – no image leaves the device. Detection is anonymous – no facial recognition. The app is based on SHORE, Fraunhofer’s proprietary software library for real-time facial detection and analysis. Emotion analysis on wearable devices has endless applications. E.g. it can be used in aids for people suffering from ASD (autism spectrum disorders) or for visually impaired.

(* low frame rate shown in the video is due to a bottleneck in the technique used to mirror Glass’ display on a computer monitor.)

[read more]

The future of textbooks

Since 2012, we have been gathering data on how US college students acquire course materials. Our annual survey of more than 1,000 students shows steady growth in the textbook-rental market. In our 2012 survey, 10 percent of all assigned textbooks were rented. Some 30 percent of textbooks were purchased new, and about 45 percent were bought used. (The remaining 15 percent includes basic e-book sales and books that were shared, borrowed, or pirated.) One year later, the proportion of rented textbooks had doubled to about 20 percent, compared with 30 percent bought new and 40 percent bought used. And in our 2014 survey, the rental share was 25 percent, compared with 30 percent for new and 35 percent for used (Exhibit 1, above).
High-res

The future of textbooks

Since 2012, we have been gathering data on how US college students acquire course materials. Our annual survey of more than 1,000 students shows steady growth in the textbook-rental market. In our 2012 survey, 10 percent of all assigned textbooks were rented. Some 30 percent of textbooks were purchased new, and about 45 percent were bought used. (The remaining 15 percent includes basic e-book sales and books that were shared, borrowed, or pirated.) One year later, the proportion of rented textbooks had doubled to about 20 percent, compared with 30 percent bought new and 40 percent bought used. And in our 2014 survey, the rental share was 25 percent, compared with 30 percent for new and 35 percent for used (Exhibit 1, above).