future

Showing 126 posts tagged future

techfutures shares:

Stanford University develops $90 iPhone accessory to replace ophthalmology kit costing tens of thousands
Researchers at Stanford University’s School of Medicine have developed two low-cost iPhone adapters that provide images of the eye that usually require specialist ophthalmology equipment costing tens of thousands of dollars. The university hopes that it will be useful both for primary care physicians in the U.S. as well as rural medical centres in developing countries.
The adapters make it easy for anyone with minimal training to take a picture of the eye and share it securely with other health practitioners or store it in the patient’s electronic record.
“Think Instagram for the eye,” said one of the developers, assistant professor of ophthalmology Robert Chang, MD …
The device shines a light through the lens of the eyeball which is reflected back, where a magnifying lens focuses an image on the camera, allowing it to capture detailed photos of both the front and back of the eye. Images can be almost instantly added to medical records for later review by a specialist, or can be transmitted from a primary care worker in a remote area to a specialist who can provide advice on the medical attention required for an eye injury.
“Adapting smartphones for the eye has the potential to enhance the delivery of eye care — in particular, to provide it in places where it’s less accessible,” said ophthalmology resident David Myung, MD, PhD. “Whether it’s in the emergency department, where patients often have to wait a long time for a specialist, or during a primary-care physician visit, we hope that we can improve the quality of care for our patients, especially in the developing world where ophthalmologists are few and far between.”
The prototypes were made from components commonly available online, and it’s hoped that 3D printing will reduce the cost even further.
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techfutures shares:

Stanford University develops $90 iPhone accessory to replace ophthalmology kit costing tens of thousands

Researchers at Stanford University’s School of Medicine have developed two low-cost iPhone adapters that provide images of the eye that usually require specialist ophthalmology equipment costing tens of thousands of dollars. The university hopes that it will be useful both for primary care physicians in the U.S. as well as rural medical centres in developing countries.

The adapters make it easy for anyone with minimal training to take a picture of the eye and share it securely with other health practitioners or store it in the patient’s electronic record.

“Think Instagram for the eye,” said one of the developers, assistant professor of ophthalmology Robert Chang, MD …

The device shines a light through the lens of the eyeball which is reflected back, where a magnifying lens focuses an image on the camera, allowing it to capture detailed photos of both the front and back of the eye. Images can be almost instantly added to medical records for later review by a specialist, or can be transmitted from a primary care worker in a remote area to a specialist who can provide advice on the medical attention required for an eye injury.

“Adapting smartphones for the eye has the potential to enhance the delivery of eye care — in particular, to provide it in places where it’s less accessible,” said ophthalmology resident David Myung, MD, PhD. “Whether it’s in the emergency department, where patients often have to wait a long time for a specialist, or during a primary-care physician visit, we hope that we can improve the quality of care for our patients, especially in the developing world where ophthalmologists are few and far between.”

The prototypes were made from components commonly available online, and it’s hoped that 3D printing will reduce the cost even further.

(via futurescope)

The instant-on computer

parislemon:

Eugene Wei:

We now live in that age, though it’s not the desktops and laptops but our tablets and smart phones that are the instant-on computers. Whether it’s transformed Amazon’s business, I can’t say; they have plenty going for them. But it’s certainly changed our usage of computers generally. I only ever turn off my iPad or iPhone if something has gone wrong and I need to reboot them or if I’m low on battery power and need to speed up recharging.

In this next age, anything that cannot turn on instantly and isn’t connected to the internet at all times will feel deficient.

So true. After a week on the road, I just booted my my desktop computer — it boots pretty fast, under 20 seconds, but it still seems like forever versus just hitting a button to turn on the screen of my iPhone or iPad.

I still remember the days it would take several minutes to start up a computer. And when you were supposed to shut them down after using them. Seems like ancient history.

Bolded for emphasis

The Web at 25

pewinternet celebrates:

Tomorrow marks the 25th anniversary of the World Wide Web. Throughout 2014, The Pew Research Center will mark this milestone with a series of reports and other activities related to the current state of online life and the potential future of the internet:

A couple weeks ago, we took a look back at more than 15 years of data on the rapid growth and overall impact of the internet. Today, we’re looking ahead to the future.

Follow our yearlong celebration of the Web’s 25th birthday, and join in on the conversation here, on Facebook, and on Twitter using #web25.

More soon!

designersofthings:

3D Systems Prints First Hybrid Robotic Exoskeleton
Since CES, 3D Systems has made some big announcements proving that 3D printing is more than just for creating trinkets like iPhone cases. The 3D printing company has partnered with the likes of Hershey and Hasbro to kick off the use of 3D printers to make candy and toys. This week they announced teaming up with EskoBionics to collaborate on the first 3D printed hybrid Exoskeleton. 
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designersofthings:

3D Systems Prints First Hybrid Robotic Exoskeleton

Since CES, 3D Systems has made some big announcements proving that 3D printing is more than just for creating trinkets like iPhone cases. The 3D printing company has partnered with the likes of Hershey and Hasbro to kick off the use of 3D printers to make candy and toys. This week they announced teaming up with EskoBionics to collaborate on the first 3D printed hybrid Exoskeleton. 

Read More

The Future of Education as Seen Through Google Glass

Minneapolis Schools Pilot Wristband To Track Physical Education 


A wristband that automatically records a student’s physical activity is being added to the curriculum for some Minneapolis high schools, a move that comes almost a decade after since they successfully led Minnesota into online physical education courses.



Students must do at least 15,000 recorded moves (up from 12,000 in the pilot period) in a day, the equivalent of more than half an hour of activity, to qualify their day’s activity. Each quarter requires 30 such days of activity.
According to Steve Brandt of the Star Tribune, activities ranging from picking up football to shoveling snow to participating in rehearsals for the school musical can add to students’ moves. For instance, as Solfest admitted, shoveling snow at home after a heavy snowfall can lead to as many as 6,000 moves. Additionally, behavior can also be modified by the bands when students analyze their data.


High-res

Minneapolis Schools Pilot Wristband To Track Physical Education

A wristband that automatically records a student’s physical activity is being added to the curriculum for some Minneapolis high schools, a move that comes almost a decade after since they successfully led Minnesota into online physical education courses.

Students must do at least 15,000 recorded moves (up from 12,000 in the pilot period) in a day, the equivalent of more than half an hour of activity, to qualify their day’s activity. Each quarter requires 30 such days of activity.

According to Steve Brandt of the Star Tribune, activities ranging from picking up football to shoveling snow to participating in rehearsals for the school musical can add to students’ moves. For instance, as Solfest admitted, shoveling snow at home after a heavy snowfall can lead to as many as 6,000 moves. Additionally, behavior can also be modified by the bands when students analyze their data.

futurescope:

Panasonic plans to make 1000 exoskeleton suits in 2015 for $5000 a piece

From Nextbigfuture:

Yahoo Japan via Japancrush reports that the first affordable, mass-produced robotic exoskeleton will be on sale next year from Panasonic. For 500,000 yen, or slightly under $5,000, this full-body power garment will let you hoist 100-kilo (220-pound) objects and move at speeds up to 8 kph (5 mph).

Activelink, the Panasonic subsidiary responsible for the suit, plans to begin rollout of the first batch of 1000 starting in 2015. At its heart will be a lithium-ion battery pack that can provide for several hours of general purpose activity.

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