faculty

Showing 1097 posts tagged faculty

4 Tips for Flipped Learning

As interest in flipped learning continues to grow, so does its adoption among the educational rank and file. By moving entry-level information outside the classroom — typically (but not exclusively) through self-paced, scored videos — teachers can reframe learning so that students spend more instructional time engaged in deeper discussions, hands-on applications and project-based learning. With a focus on more direct contact between teachers and students, greater application of basic concepts, and increased collaboration between learners, flipped learning provides yet another outlet for 21st century teaching.
No doubt, making this kind of change can be intimidating. Before teachers flip out, here are four tips to make the transition smoother — and more impactful…

4 Tips for Flipped Learning

As interest in flipped learning continues to grow, so does its adoption among the educational rank and file. By moving entry-level information outside the classroom — typically (but not exclusively) through self-paced, scored videos — teachers can reframe learning so that students spend more instructional time engaged in deeper discussions, hands-on applications and project-based learning. With a focus on more direct contact between teachers and students, greater application of basic concepts, and increased collaboration between learners, flipped learning provides yet another outlet for 21st century teaching.

No doubt, making this kind of change can be intimidating. Before teachers flip out, here are four tips to make the transition smoother — and more impactful…

If you ask professional educators in a public forum whether they view parents as assets or liabilities, the answers will vary only in decibel level: ‘Assets,’ ‘Our greatest asset,’ ‘invaluable partners,’ and so forth. But what if you caught them off guard, late at night after a few drinks, say?

Or, better yet, what if you simply examined how most schools treat parents?

Assets or Liabilities?

Maintaining balance

To maintain balance and increase productivity, spend a few moments in the morning evaluating your priorities. Write each of your daily tasks in whichever quadrant it belongs. Try to identify which quadrant(s) you spend the majority of your time in and you’ll have a clear picture of what’s most important to you. Then, all you have to do is get in the habit of evaluating each task with this chart in mind.
 Maintaining balance is about choosing what to do and what not to do. No matter what your goals and pressures are, remember that your time and actions are under your control.

image via flickr:CC | College of Ag Communications High-res

Maintaining balance

To maintain balance and increase productivity, spend a few moments in the morning evaluating your priorities. Write each of your daily tasks in whichever quadrant it belongs. Try to identify which quadrant(s) you spend the majority of your time in and you’ll have a clear picture of what’s most important to you. Then, all you have to do is get in the habit of evaluating each task with this chart in mind.

Maintaining balance is about choosing what to do and what not to do. No matter what your goals and pressures are, remember that your time and actions are under your control.

image via flickr:CC | College of Ag Communications

Nearly 75 Percent of [Highered] Faculty Incorporated Technology into their Teaching in the Past Year

When it comes to technology in the classroom, phrases like “faculty resistance” and the importance of getting “faculty buy-in” are tossed around with great frequency. But is that perception still valid? Are all instructors so set in their ways, skeptical of anything new, and fearful of deviating from what they’ve done that it’s nearly impossible to get them to try something new?
High-res

Nearly 75 Percent of [Highered] Faculty Incorporated Technology into their Teaching in the Past Year

When it comes to technology in the classroom, phrases like “faculty resistance” and the importance of getting “faculty buy-in” are tossed around with great frequency. But is that perception still valid? Are all instructors so set in their ways, skeptical of anything new, and fearful of deviating from what they’ve done that it’s nearly impossible to get them to try something new?

Common Core: Putting Students on Paths to 21st-Century Success

This downloadable, shareable, and printable poster has two parts. On the left side, you’ll see six classroom scenes that show a necessary 21st-century skill that teachers are developing through their instruction with the help of the standards. All six of these skills lead to 21st-century success—and can be found embedded in various lessons and activities at every grade level.
The right side of the poster shows where these classroom paths lead: to three top skills that employers say students will need to be college and career ready. (Research shows that college and career readiness is the #1 topic of interest to parents when discussing the standards.) So this poster shows exactly what parents want to see—how teachers are preparing students for 21st-century success. 
High-res

Common Core: Putting Students on Paths to 21st-Century Success

This downloadable, shareable, and printable poster has two parts. On the left side, you’ll see six classroom scenes that show a necessary 21st-century skill that teachers are developing through their instruction with the help of the standards. All six of these skills lead to 21st-century success—and can be found embedded in various lessons and activities at every grade level.

The right side of the poster shows where these classroom paths lead: to three top skills that employers say students will need to be college and career ready. (Research shows that college and career readiness is the #1 topic of interest to parents when discussing the standards.) So this poster shows exactly what parents want to see—how teachers are preparing students for 21st-century success.

Motivation: Reflecting On What To Do When It’s Not There

That’s Lesson Number One that I wish I knew as a student: Sometimes you aren’t going to be motivated but do it anyway — such a simple lesson that has propelled me into action. Maybe motivation is overrated. Maybe in order to be successful we don’t really need a whole lot of it.
 Really it’s just a shift in perspective…

image via flickr:CC | bastique High-res

Motivation: Reflecting On What To Do When It’s Not There

That’s Lesson Number One that I wish I knew as a student: Sometimes you aren’t going to be motivated but do it anyway — such a simple lesson that has propelled me into action. Maybe motivation is overrated. Maybe in order to be successful we don’t really need a whole lot of it.

Really it’s just a shift in perspective

image via flickr:CC | bastique

Mastering the Teaching Game

Coach Groeneveld’s eight principles are the essence of powerful teaching. The teacher walks into a classroom and accepts the reality that the only way to reach students is to know them as individuals. After that, by unfolding layers to access students’ core, the shared goal setting ensues. The teacher knows the content well and can teach “mechanics” in a way that compels attention. But the instructor also realizes that until the young student thinks like a successful student, the mechanics will fall short. And so the educator — the learning architect — assiduously teaches each individual to take responsibility for his or her own game or learning plan. Each success empowers the next success. And these successes belong to the child. Teaching itself is reward enough.

image via flickr:CC | jacqui.brown33 High-res

Mastering the Teaching Game

Coach Groeneveld’s eight principles are the essence of powerful teaching. The teacher walks into a classroom and accepts the reality that the only way to reach students is to know them as individuals. After that, by unfolding layers to access students’ core, the shared goal setting ensues. The teacher knows the content well and can teach “mechanics” in a way that compels attention. But the instructor also realizes that until the young student thinks like a successful student, the mechanics will fall short. And so the educator — the learning architect — assiduously teaches each individual to take responsibility for his or her own game or learning plan. Each success empowers the next success. And these successes belong to the child. Teaching itself is reward enough.

image via flickr:CC | jacqui.brown33

How teaching is like a chef. What teaching is: Reflections of new teachers

Teaching is like the song Let it Go from Frozen because you must let go of fears and nerves in order to tackle curiosities and explore the living world of the classroom.
Teaching is like Tetris.  You desperately want everything to fit in, but it is so hard!
Teaching is like being a chef.  You must mix the ingredients (students and knowledge) together and hopefully they mix well.  Even if it’s not what you expected, if should still be edible.
Teaching is like cooking.  You have to balance the ingredients with technique.
A teacher is like a gardener.  They plant ideas and tend to the garden, but also step back and let things grow.
Teaching is like “Floppy Bird” because it takes a lot of time and practice to get to the next level.

image via flickr:CC | USDAgov High-res

How teaching is like a chef. What teaching is: Reflections of new teachers

  • Teaching is like the song Let it Go from Frozen because you must let go of fears and nerves in order to tackle curiosities and explore the living world of the classroom.
  • Teaching is like Tetris.  You desperately want everything to fit in, but it is so hard!
  • Teaching is like being a chef.  You must mix the ingredients (students and knowledge) together and hopefully they mix well.  Even if it’s not what you expected, if should still be edible.
  • Teaching is like cooking.  You have to balance the ingredients with technique.
  • A teacher is like a gardener.  They plant ideas and tend to the garden, but also step back and let things grow.
  • Teaching is like “Floppy Bird” because it takes a lot of time and practice to get to the next level.

image via flickr:CC | USDAgov