engineering

Showing 79 posts tagged engineering

Women should embrace the B’s in college to make more later

The college majors that tend to lead to the most profitable professions are also the stingiest about awarding A’s. Science departments grade, on a four-point scale, an average of 0.4 points lower than humanities departments, according to a 2010 analysis of national grading data by Stuart Rojstaczer and Christopher Healy. And two new research studies suggest that women might be abandoning these lucrative disciplines precisely because they’re terrified of getting B’s.
High-res

Women should embrace the B’s in college to make more later

The college majors that tend to lead to the most profitable professions are also the stingiest about awarding A’s. Science departments grade, on a four-point scale, an average of 0.4 points lower than humanities departments, according to a 2010 analysis of national grading data by Stuart Rojstaczer and Christopher Healy. And two new research studies suggest that women might be abandoning these lucrative disciplines precisely because they’re terrified of getting B’s.

First Satellite Developed By High Schoolers Sent Into Space

The first satellite ever developed by high school students to make it to space is believed to be orbiting Earth after getting a ride aboard a U.S. military rocket Tuesday night from Wallops Island, Va.
Fittingly, perhaps, you can send it a text message.
The satellite, using a voice synthesizer, is built to transform that text into an audio message that can be heard over certain radio frequencies around the globe, and in different languages.

First Satellite Developed By High Schoolers Sent Into Space

The first satellite ever developed by high school students to make it to space is believed to be orbiting Earth after getting a ride aboard a U.S. military rocket Tuesday night from Wallops Island, Va.

Fittingly, perhaps, you can send it a text message.

The satellite, using a voice synthesizer, is built to transform that text into an audio message that can be heard over certain radio frequencies around the globe, and in different languages.


Computer science is currently the highest-paid college degree. At the same time, employers say that they cannot find employees who have the computer skills needed to succeed in their workplace. This trend is expected to only get worse, with three times as many job openings as there are qualified persons to fit them. The end result is half a billion dollars on the table per year in salary.
Only one in four students in high school can take a computing class. At the university level, only one in ten schools have computer-programming courses. Less than one in forty students graduate with a degree in computer science at the same time that there is a crucial labor shortage.
High-res

Computer science is currently the highest-paid college degree. At the same time, employers say that they cannot find employees who have the computer skills needed to succeed in their workplace. This trend is expected to only get worse, with three times as many job openings as there are qualified persons to fit them. The end result is half a billion dollars on the table per year in salary.

Only one in four students in high school can take a computing class. At the university level, only one in ten schools have computer-programming courses. Less than one in forty students graduate with a degree in computer science at the same time that there is a crucial labor shortage.

We live in a world increasingly dominated by science. And that’s fine. I became a science writer because I think science is the most exciting, dynamic, consequential part of human culture, and I wanted to be a part of that. Also, I have two college-age kids, and I’d be thrilled if they pursued careers in science, engineering or medicine. I certainly want them to learn as much science and math as they can, because those skills can help you get a great job.

But it is precisely because science is so powerful that we need the humanities now more than ever. In your science, mathematics and engineering classes, you’re given facts, answers, knowledge, truth. Your professors say, “This is how things are.” They give you certainty. The humanities, at least the way I teach them, give you uncertainty, doubt and skepticism.

The humanities are subversive. They undermine the claims of all authorities, whether political, religious or scientific. This skepticism is especially important when it comes to claims about humanity, about what we are, where we came from, and even what we can be and should be. Science has replaced religion as our main source of answers to these questions. Science has told us a lot about ourselves, and we’re learning more every day.

But the humanities remind us that we have an enormous capacity for deluding ourselves. They also tell us that every single human is unique, different than every other human, and each of us keeps changing in unpredictable ways. The societies we live in also keep changing–in part because of science and technology! So in certain important ways, humans resist the kind of explanations that science gives us.

Science writer John Horgan responds to the major recent report on the value of the humanities.

Pair with Dorion Sagan on why science and philosophy need each other

(via explore-blog)

Brilliant.

(via jtotheizzoe)

(via katy-mylady)

5 steps to STEM effectiveness

Create a common, working definition of STEM.
Provide teachers and administrators the time and flexibility to collaborate.
Identify and address ingrained barriers to improving STEM equity and instruction.
Engage outside partners early — industry, post-secondary and policy makers want programs to succeed.
Don’t get hung up on the acronym.

image via flickr:CC | The U.S. Military Academy at West Point High-res

5 steps to STEM effectiveness

  • Create a common, working definition of STEM.
  • Provide teachers and administrators the time and flexibility to collaborate.
  • Identify and address ingrained barriers to improving STEM equity and instruction.
  • Engage outside partners early — industry, post-secondary and policy makers want programs to succeed.
  • Don’t get hung up on the acronym.

image via flickr:CC | The U.S. Military Academy at West Point

Closing the STEM Gender Gap in K-12 Education: How Teachers Can Help

The good news is that teachers can play a huge role in helping to decrease the STEM gender gap. Erik Robelen, writing in Education Week last year , noted, “Long before women pick a college major or enter the workforce, their K-12 education sets the stage in level of interest, confidence, and achievement in STEM.” More recently, Forbes suggested reworking K-12 curriculum to cultivate interest in science and technology early and to encourage girls by offering more hands-on workshops and bringing female engineers to talk to students. What can teachers do? Some ideas pulled from the on-going discussion

Many of the suggestion center around awareness, that girls can’t aspire to what they don’t know and aren’t introduced to. How have you tried to close the STEM gender gap?

Want a Job When You Graduate? 4 College Courses You Shouldn’t Miss

whatiscollegefor:

For years, you’ve heard about the importance of a college education and were told that any job worth having required one. You heard that higher education was scarce, and a degree in any subject would set you apart from the competition. And, once upon a time, it was true—but in 2013, it’s not.

The current employment crisis is only partly due to the recession. Another part of the problem is that there are fewer and fewer science, mathematics and engineering graduates and more and more art, psychology and communication graduates. Since we are in the midst of the technology revolution, those numbers should be reversed.

recent study from Georgetown University showed that liberal arts degrees were accompanied by low wages—for the duration of the employee’s career. A college graduate with a bachelor’s degree in art earns about the same salary as a community college graduate. That means those last two years at a four-year school have no value on the job market.”

Ouch.