employement

Showing 49 posts tagged employement

Most teachers pay for their own graduate school and ongoing professional training, and over 92 percent buy supplies for their students out of their own pockets. But over the past few years, we’ve seen over 60 percent of teachers working second jobs, dining with their children at food banks, and even selling their blood to make ends meet. Examples of such financial stress and strain can be found in every state in the country; quality teachers are walking away from the profession, and salaries are part of the reason they leave.

Is this the way we want any of our teachers to live? Is this what we think will lead students to higher levels of achievement?

Why teachers’ salaries should be doubled — now

fastcompany:

LinkedIn has released its list of the most-used adjectives on its profiles in 2013, with “responsible” beating out 2011 and 2012’s winning word, “creative.” It’s an analytical (10th on the list) study which, while not particularly innovative (9th)—how many end-of-year listicles does it take before the concept ceases to be effective (4th)? Be honest if you’re being driven (8th) mad by them.
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fastcompany:

LinkedIn has released its list of the most-used adjectives on its profiles in 2013, with “responsible” beating out 2011 and 2012’s winning word, “creative.” It’s an analytical (10th on the list) study which, while not particularly innovative (9th)—how many end-of-year listicles does it take before the concept ceases to be effective (4th)? Be honest if you’re being driven (8th) mad by them.

theatlantic depresses you with:

A Lost Decade For Young Workers

Whether they were college grads or just out of high school, wages for entry-level American workers fell between 2000 and 2011, according to a new study from the Economic Policy Institute.
The left-leaning think tank has dubbed the aughts a “lost decade” for young workers, and it’s a fairly apt description. College-educated men and women entering the workforce saw their inflation-adjusted earnings fall 5.2 percent and 4.4 percent, respectively. Wages slumped 8 percent for high school-educated men, and 3.1 percent for women.
Read more. [Image: Economic Policy Institute]

High-res

theatlantic depresses you with:

A Lost Decade For Young Workers

Whether they were college grads or just out of high school, wages for entry-level American workers fell between 2000 and 2011, according to a new study from the Economic Policy Institute.

The left-leaning think tank has dubbed the aughts a “lost decade” for young workers, and it’s a fairly apt description. College-educated men and women entering the workforce saw their inflation-adjusted earnings fall 5.2 percent and 4.4 percent, respectively. Wages slumped 8 percent for high school-educated men, and 3.1 percent for women.

Read more. [Image: Economic Policy Institute]

'Badges' Earned Online Pose Challenge to Traditional College Diplomas

Educational upstarts across the Web are adopting systems of “badges” to  certify skills and abilities. If scouting focuses on outdoorsy skills  like tying knots, these badges denote areas employers might look for,  like mentorship or digital video editing. Many of the new digital badges  are easy to attain—intentionally so—to keep students motivated, while  others signal mastery of fine-grained skills that are not formally  recognized in a traditional classroom.

'Badges' Earned Online Pose Challenge to Traditional College Diplomas

Educational upstarts across the Web are adopting systems of “badges” to certify skills and abilities. If scouting focuses on outdoorsy skills like tying knots, these badges denote areas employers might look for, like mentorship or digital video editing. Many of the new digital badges are easy to attain—intentionally so—to keep students motivated, while others signal mastery of fine-grained skills that are not formally recognized in a traditional classroom.

Want a Job? Go to College, and Don’t Major in Architecture

Recent college graduates are still doing a lot better than their  less-educated counterparts. Unemployment for new graduates is around 8.9  percent; the rate for workers with only a high school degree is nearly  three times as high, at 22.9 percent.
That’s according to a new report from Georgetown’s Center on Education and the Workforce. The  report also had some fascinating statistics on earnings and jobless  rates by college major.
High-res

Want a Job? Go to College, and Don’t Major in Architecture

Recent college graduates are still doing a lot better than their less-educated counterparts. Unemployment for new graduates is around 8.9 percent; the rate for workers with only a high school degree is nearly three times as high, at 22.9 percent.

That’s according to a new report from Georgetown’s Center on Education and the Workforce. The report also had some fascinating statistics on earnings and jobless rates by college major.

Do Teachers Care About Pay?

Yes, But Not as Much as You Think.

On some level, of course, pay does matter. Wages should be competitive. But pay is not the driving reason good teachers leave the classroom; it’s merely the icing on the cake. Policymakers and stakeholders need to tackle the deeper reasons why promising teachers leave the classroom year after year. Otherwise, districts will simply continue to supplant their teaching force summer after summer.

Unemployed teachers finding work as nannies

As job prospects across the state and nation remain bleak for new and  laid-off teachers — more than 8,800 Illinois teachers received pink  slips in 2010, according to officials — many are finding welcome work as  nannies and baby sitters.
Nannies increasingly say they have  found that parents jump at the chance to leave their children with  someone with a teaching background, offering generous incentives such as  signing bonuses and extra time off. The popularity has inspired the  creation of one local website — sitterworks.com, which plans to launch  soon — specifically for unemployed teachers and nurses hoping to find  work in child care.

Unemployed teachers finding work as nannies

As job prospects across the state and nation remain bleak for new and laid-off teachers — more than 8,800 Illinois teachers received pink slips in 2010, according to officials — many are finding welcome work as nannies and baby sitters.

Nannies increasingly say they have found that parents jump at the chance to leave their children with someone with a teaching background, offering generous incentives such as signing bonuses and extra time off. The popularity has inspired the creation of one local website — sitterworks.com, which plans to launch soon — specifically for unemployed teachers and nurses hoping to find work in child care.