education

Showing 4243 posts tagged education

Examining Knowledge Beliefs to Motivate Student Learning

4 Tips for Flipped Learning

As interest in flipped learning continues to grow, so does its adoption among the educational rank and file. By moving entry-level information outside the classroom — typically (but not exclusively) through self-paced, scored videos — teachers can reframe learning so that students spend more instructional time engaged in deeper discussions, hands-on applications and project-based learning. With a focus on more direct contact between teachers and students, greater application of basic concepts, and increased collaboration between learners, flipped learning provides yet another outlet for 21st century teaching.
No doubt, making this kind of change can be intimidating. Before teachers flip out, here are four tips to make the transition smoother — and more impactful…

4 Tips for Flipped Learning

As interest in flipped learning continues to grow, so does its adoption among the educational rank and file. By moving entry-level information outside the classroom — typically (but not exclusively) through self-paced, scored videos — teachers can reframe learning so that students spend more instructional time engaged in deeper discussions, hands-on applications and project-based learning. With a focus on more direct contact between teachers and students, greater application of basic concepts, and increased collaboration between learners, flipped learning provides yet another outlet for 21st century teaching.

No doubt, making this kind of change can be intimidating. Before teachers flip out, here are four tips to make the transition smoother — and more impactful…

Kindergartners’ Skills at School Entry: An Analysis of the ECLS-K 

Although most American children receive some pre-K child care and education, kindergarten still represents many children’s first exposure to formal schooling. Kindergarten supports children’s cognitive, social, and emotional skills, leading to rapid gains in knowledge during this first year of education. 
However, not all children enter kindergarten equally prepared to meet the challenges ahead of them. Researchers have found stark differences in kindergartners’ language, literacy, and math abilities as well as their social skills and behavioral approaches to learning. These areas are interdependent, and children who start kindergarten behind in math, reading, and attention-related skills risk being unable to catch up to their peers later on.
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Kindergartners’ Skills at School Entry: An Analysis of the ECLS-K

Although most American children receive some pre-K child care and education, kindergarten still represents many children’s first exposure to formal schooling. Kindergarten supports children’s cognitive, social, and emotional skills, leading to rapid gains in knowledge during this first year of education.

However, not all children enter kindergarten equally prepared to meet the challenges ahead of them. Researchers have found stark differences in kindergartners’ language, literacy, and math abilities as well as their social skills and behavioral approaches to learning. These areas are interdependent, and children who start kindergarten behind in math, reading, and attention-related skills risk being unable to catch up to their peers later on.

On the Patch to Equity: Improving the Effectiveness of Beginning Teachers

A new policy and economic environment promises to upend the twentieth-century blueprint for high schools that has left large numbers of students without diplomas or the advanced skills essential for college and careers. To prepare graduates for a twenty-first-century society and a global workplace, most states adopted the Common Core State Standards or other internationally benchmarked college- and career- ready standards. Long-standing concerns remain,however, about whether states have an educator workforce, or the capacity to produce one, with the training and skills needed to ensure that students achieve the learning outcomes essential to succeed in school and beyond. If the dominant teacher workforce policies and practices remain unchanged, then the aspirations of rigorous state standards will simply continue a legacy of unfulfilled reforms.
High-res

On the Patch to Equity: Improving the Effectiveness of Beginning Teachers

A new policy and economic environment promises to upend the twentieth-century blueprint for high schools that has left large numbers of students without diplomas or the advanced skills essential for college and careers. To prepare graduates for a twenty-first-century society and a global workplace, most states adopted the Common Core State Standards or other internationally benchmarked college- and career- ready standards. Long-standing concerns remain,however, about whether states have an educator workforce, or the capacity to produce one, with the training and skills needed to ensure that students achieve the learning outcomes essential to succeed in school and beyond. If the dominant teacher workforce policies and practices remain unchanged, then the aspirations of rigorous state standards will simply continue a legacy of unfulfilled reforms.

Study: For poor teens, better schools equal less risky behavior

Low-income teenagers are significantly less likely to engage in certain risky health behaviors, such as gang membership and binge drinking, when they attend high-performing schools, according to a new study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics. 
The newest evidence in a growing national discussion about the connections between health and education, the University of California, Los Angeles study compared low-income students in lottery-based, high-performing public charter schools with other teens who were not accepted into those schools. Although demographically equivalent, students in the first group were much less likely to become pregnant, use drugs other than marijuana, carry a weapon to school, or engage in any number of other behaviors categorized by the researchers as “very risky.”  

image via flickr:CC | myDefinition High-res

Study: For poor teens, better schools equal less risky behavior

Low-income teenagers are significantly less likely to engage in certain risky health behaviors, such as gang membership and binge drinking, when they attend high-performing schools, according to a new study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics. 

The newest evidence in a growing national discussion about the connections between health and education, the University of California, Los Angeles study compared low-income students in lottery-based, high-performing public charter schools with other teens who were not accepted into those schools. Although demographically equivalent, students in the first group were much less likely to become pregnant, use drugs other than marijuana, carry a weapon to school, or engage in any number of other behaviors categorized by the researchers as “very risky.” 

image via flickr:CC | myDefinition

Report: Higher education behind on Common Core

America’s primary and secondary schools may be busy preparing for the onset of the Common Core standards, meant to better prepare students for college, but one key partner isn’t even close to ready: colleges and universities themselves.
That’s the conclusion of a new report from the New America Foundation, which finds that “there is little evidence to suggest colleges are meaningfully aligning college instruction and teacher preparation programs with the Common Core standards.”
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Report: Higher education behind on Common Core

America’s primary and secondary schools may be busy preparing for the onset of the Common Core standards, meant to better prepare students for college, but one key partner isn’t even close to ready: colleges and universities themselves.

That’s the conclusion of a new report from the New America Foundation, which finds that “there is little evidence to suggest colleges are meaningfully aligning college instruction and teacher preparation programs with the Common Core standards.”

Principals in U.S. Are More Likely to Consider Their Students Poor

The phrase “soft bigotry of low expectations” is inevitably associated with George W. Bush, who used it frequently. But whatever your politics, the idea has undeniable merit: If schools don’t expect much from their students, the students are not likely to accomplish much.
A new international study, set to be released Tuesday, argues that the United States has an expectation problem.
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Principals in U.S. Are More Likely to Consider Their Students Poor

The phrase “soft bigotry of low expectations” is inevitably associated with George W. Bush, who used it frequently. But whatever your politics, the idea has undeniable merit: If schools don’t expect much from their students, the students are not likely to accomplish much.

A new international study, set to be released Tuesday, argues that the United States has an expectation problem.

New college data give fuller picture of graduation rates — and show challenges

Dozens of public universities across the country, including three in Maryland, report that fewer than half of their full-time freshmen in 2007 earned bachelor’s degrees after six years at those schools or after switching to other schools.
This chart shows data for 266 colleges and universities, tracking outcomes for first-time, full-time students who entered college in 2007.  See the chart.
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New college data give fuller picture of graduation rates — and show challenges

Dozens of public universities across the country, including three in Maryland, report that fewer than half of their full-time freshmen in 2007 earned bachelor’s degrees after six years at those schools or after switching to other schools.

This chart shows data for 266 colleges and universities, tracking outcomes for first-time, full-time students who entered college in 2007. See the chart.

Greener, Cheaper, and More Mobile

States may be getting a deal for their teachers. The Consortium for Policy Research in Education (CPRE) recently released a report on the changing trends in the teaching workforce. The authors—Ingersoll, Merril, and Stuckey—found seven trends in the data. The teaching force is simultaneously becoming: larger, older, younger and less experienced, more female, more racially diverse, and more consistent in academic ability. Important to the topic of state pension plans, the report findings mean that states have more retirees to pay for. But at the same time, states are hiring younger and more transient teachers who can be paid lower salaries and often leave before qualifying for a large or even moderate pension. It’s ostensibly a bargain for the state, but a loss for individual teachers.
High-res

Greener, Cheaper, and More Mobile

States may be getting a deal for their teachers. The Consortium for Policy Research in Education (CPRE) recently released a report on the changing trends in the teaching workforce. The authors—Ingersoll, Merril, and Stuckey—found seven trends in the data. The teaching force is simultaneously becoming: larger, older, younger and less experienced, more female, more racially diverse, and more consistent in academic ability. Important to the topic of state pension plans, the report findings mean that states have more retirees to pay for. But at the same time, states are hiring younger and more transient teachers who can be paid lower salaries and often leave before qualifying for a large or even moderate pension. It’s ostensibly a bargain for the state, but a loss for individual teachers.

Coaching parents on toddler talk to address low-income word gap

By age four, toddlers in low-income families hear 30 million fewer words than those in high-income families, according to researchers. As a result, these children tend to have smaller vocabularies and fall behind in reading. Special correspondent John Tulenko of Learning Matters reports on one program in Providence, Rhode Island, that gets low-income parents talking more to their toddlers.