education

Showing 4432 posts tagged education

This is, for me, the biggest change — not a switch in rules, but a switch in how I see my role. Professors are at least as bad at estimating how interesting we are as the students are at estimating their ability to focus. Against oppositional models of teaching and learning, both negative — Concentrate, or lose out!—and positive — Let me attract your attention! — I’m coming to see student focus as a collaborative process. It’s me and them working to create a classroom where the students who want to focus have the best shot at it, in a world increasingly hostile to that goal.

Why a leading professor of new media just banned technology use in class - The Washington Post (via notational)

(via notational)

The Death of the Field Trip (and the Rise of the Connected Educator)

Programs demonstrating an art form but lacking any direct connection to the curriculum went (largely) out of favor years ago, it’s true, but now it’s become harder to justify any extra trip, event or performance.
Okay then, how about a dynamic session with an experienced artist/educator who could seamlessly connect your curriculum — the important work you’re already doing — with an interactive arts experience in a way that completely engaged not only your more, well, engaged students, but also your most reluctant learners? You know, the ones you really struggle to reach every day. After all, we certainly understand that different children learn in different ways, and indeed we see this played out every Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday.

image via flickr:CC | GlacierGuyMT High-res

The Death of the Field Trip (and the Rise of the Connected Educator)

Programs demonstrating an art form but lacking any direct connection to the curriculum went (largely) out of favor years ago, it’s true, but now it’s become harder to justify any extra trip, event or performance.

Okay then, how about a dynamic session with an experienced artist/educator who could seamlessly connect your curriculum — the important work you’re already doing — with an interactive arts experience in a way that completely engaged not only your more, well, engaged students, but also your most reluctant learners? You know, the ones you really struggle to reach every day. After all, we certainly understand that different children learn in different ways, and indeed we see this played out every Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday.

image via flickr:CC | GlacierGuyMT

Want proof college is worth it? Look at this list of the highest-paying majors

Is a four-year college degree worth it? Generally yes, but the results vary quite a bit across majors — and can even vary widely within majors.
That’s the takeaway from new research by Brad Hershbein and Melissa Kearney at The Hamilton Project. 
Topping the list are the engineering fields, to no one’s surprise. Some of the least-earning majors are related to education, theater and art. Over a lifetime, the median expected earnings for a drama or theater arts major is lower than that of someone with a two-year associate’s degree.
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Want proof college is worth it? Look at this list of the highest-paying majors

Is a four-year college degree worth it? Generally yes, but the results vary quite a bit across majors — and can even vary widely within majors.

That’s the takeaway from new research by Brad Hershbein and Melissa Kearney at The Hamilton Project.

Topping the list are the engineering fields, to no one’s surprise. Some of the least-earning majors are related to education, theater and art. Over a lifetime, the median expected earnings for a drama or theater arts major is lower than that of someone with a two-year associate’s degree.

Students lack school-life balance

In 2009, I produced Race to Nowhere, a documentary that told the stories of students who were burned out and overworked by our pressure-cooker education culture. While the film has had more than 7,500 public and community-hosted screenings, and inspired changes in some schools around the country, it’s clear that we are still in need of a greater cultural shift.
On the fifth anniversary of the documentary’s release, research continues to show the harm we’re doing to our children by overpacking their schedules in the name of productivity, achievement and competition. And I am seeing this again firsthand with the youngest of my three children, Zak.

image via flickr:CC | bottled_void High-res

Students lack school-life balance

In 2009, I produced Race to Nowhere, a documentary that told the stories of students who were burned out and overworked by our pressure-cooker education culture. While the film has had more than 7,500 public and community-hosted screenings, and inspired changes in some schools around the country, it’s clear that we are still in need of a greater cultural shift.

On the fifth anniversary of the documentary’s release, research continues to show the harm we’re doing to our children by overpacking their schedules in the name of productivity, achievement and competition. And I am seeing this again firsthand with the youngest of my three children, Zak.

image via flickr:CC | bottled_void

Textbooks are full of useful information and handy to have around when you need to look up a fact. Memorizing facts is not as important as knowing how to ask questions and how to synthesize information to formulate an answer.

When we plan out our courses—and our entire curriculum—we should keep this in mind: How much of the information that we are going to cover do the students really need to know? How much time do we devote to making sure students know when they need a fact and how to look it up? Finally, and most important, do our students know what to do with the facts once they find them?

Why Don’t We Teach the Telephone Book?

Four Activities to Jump-Start Teamwork Among Teachers and School Leaders

While it’s important to select team members with the right skills, it’s even more important to build, maintain and grow these skills over time. To do that, what if teachers and school leaders followed the example set by successful sports coaches? “Start-of-the-season” practice sessions and ongoing activities built into their work could be a way to jump-start and deepen team creativity, problem-solving and innovation skills.

image via flickr:CC | FailedImitator High-res

Four Activities to Jump-Start Teamwork Among Teachers and School Leaders

While it’s important to select team members with the right skills, it’s even more important to build, maintain and grow these skills over time. To do that, what if teachers and school leaders followed the example set by successful sports coaches? “Start-of-the-season” practice sessions and ongoing activities built into their work could be a way to jump-start and deepen team creativity, problem-solving and innovation skills.

image via flickr:CC | FailedImitator

Group Work Challenge: Assessing Team Members

Are these the best and worst states for teachers?

The WalletHub Web site looked at data to determine the states that they call the “teacher friendliest states in the country.”
In the new “teacher friendly” rankings, here’s what’s not included: information on whether states have preserved job protections for teachers, or whether teachers are fairly evaluated, or whether under-prepared Teach For America corps members are replacing veteran teachers, or  the overall impact of corporate-based school reform on the teaching profession.
So are these rankings really showing the “teacher-friendliest” states?  Not so much.
High-res

Are these the best and worst states for teachers?

The WalletHub Web site looked at data to determine the states that they call the “teacher friendliest states in the country.”

In the new “teacher friendly” rankings, here’s what’s not included: information on whether states have preserved job protections for teachers, or whether teachers are fairly evaluated, or whether under-prepared Teach For America corps members are replacing veteran teachers, or  the overall impact of corporate-based school reform on the teaching profession.

So are these rankings really showing the “teacher-friendliest” states?  Not so much.

Here’s the thing…when we dismiss something because of our fear of the unknown as educators, we don’t just lose out ourselves, but those that we serve lose out as well. Teachers impact students, principals impact teachers and students, and superintendents can impact everyone. When our fear holds us back, it often holds others back as well. Fear often has the power to kill innovation.

What Our Fear Actually Inhibits

Students Riding on Coattails during Group Work? Five Simple Ideas to Try
Design a group project in which the students work in phases.
Develop an element of the project that allows group members to make their own choices.
Within a group project, include a component requiring individual students to submit non-onerous individual work.
Devote a segment (30 minutes or so) during class before all group projects begin to implement two important steps.
Prepare students to expect the unexpected.
High-res

Students Riding on Coattails during Group Work? Five Simple Ideas to Try

  1. Design a group project in which the students work in phases.
  2. Develop an element of the project that allows group members to make their own choices.
  3. Within a group project, include a component requiring individual students to submit non-onerous individual work.
  4. Devote a segment (30 minutes or so) during class before all group projects begin to implement two important steps.
  5. Prepare students to expect the unexpected.