edtech

Showing 374 posts tagged edtech

MIT Offering Free MOOCs on Game Design and Educational Technology

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has announced a new initiative to teach video game design and online education free of charge. Russell Westerholm of University Herald writes that MIT is kicking off the first series of massive open online courses (MOOCs) this week, focusing on educational technology. Next will come game design starting on Oct. 22, and, in the near future, there will be courses on educational gaming and technology.

image via flickr:CC | Nietnagel High-res

MIT Offering Free MOOCs on Game Design and Educational Technology

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has announced a new initiative to teach video game design and online education free of charge. Russell Westerholm of University Herald writes that MIT is kicking off the first series of massive open online courses (MOOCs) this week, focusing on educational technology. Next will come game design starting on Oct. 22, and, in the near future, there will be courses on educational gaming and technology.

image via flickr:CC | Nietnagel

This is, for me, the biggest change — not a switch in rules, but a switch in how I see my role. Professors are at least as bad at estimating how interesting we are as the students are at estimating their ability to focus. Against oppositional models of teaching and learning, both negative — Concentrate, or lose out!—and positive — Let me attract your attention! — I’m coming to see student focus as a collaborative process. It’s me and them working to create a classroom where the students who want to focus have the best shot at it, in a world increasingly hostile to that goal.

Why a leading professor of new media just banned technology use in class - The Washington Post (via notational)

(via notational)

5 Tips For Keeping Students On Task While Using Technology

Playing games, chatting with their friends, and browsing the internet are all likely suspects drawing your students’ attention away from whatever the task at hand happens to be, but just because students have access to technology doesn’t mean you have to transform into device police and forget about teaching. Even if your students would much rather be watching videos on YouTube than learning about the Roman Empire, you still have the upper hand: they want to be using the device. Period.

So how can you leverage that into students who are actually working on what they should be? Here are a few tips

edTech Trends - Sep 2014 Faculty Meeting

Every faculty meeting I try to provide 5 short blurbs about educational technology – helpful resources, teaching ideas, and research trends. This month, there’s a few news/update items, and I’m re-introducing my tumblr/blog that I encourage you to use as a resource.

  1. Video announcements
  2. Paging
  3. Moodle requirement for 2015-16
  4. Faculty technology self-assessment survey
  5. Gwen’s blog – in the cloud

Check your email for more details and a 1 day back-channel if you have questions, ideas, or just want me to connect with you.

Wanted: Long-Term Thinking about Technology and Education 

The rampant spread of technology-mediated learning has set off fits of hype and hand-wringing—yet the U.S.’s traditional centers of higher education have mostly failed to confront the pace of change and the implications for students. There is probably no way anyone can keep up with this transformation: the technology is simply evolving too rapidly. Nevertheless, we keep trying. Will these developments truly serve our goals for advanced education? We need to know urgently.

image via flickr:CC | karola riegler photography High-res

Wanted: Long-Term Thinking about Technology and Education

The rampant spread of technology-mediated learning has set off fits of hype and hand-wringing—yet the U.S.’s traditional centers of higher education have mostly failed to confront the pace of change and the implications for students. There is probably no way anyone can keep up with this transformation: the technology is simply evolving too rapidly. Nevertheless, we keep trying. Will these developments truly serve our goals for advanced education? We need to know urgently.

image via flickr:CC | karola riegler photography

Going "all-in" to pursue 21st century education

Important Questions About Technology and Learning

  1. What do we want technology to do in schools?
  2. Does more money equal increased learning?
  3. If we buy a lot of expensive technology and sometimes use it ineffectively, or dangerously, what does that get us?
  4. Are we asking the right questions about technology, learning, and schools?
  5. What world will our students exit school into?
  6. What skills will they need to be successful? Collaboration - Communication - Creativity - Divergent thinking
  7. We need technology to help foster these skills, and point our students in the right direction
  8. Is the way we are using technology now turning our students ‘off’ to the people and the world around them?