economics

Showing 163 posts tagged economics

New Teachers Owe $429/month In Loans

A March 26, 2014 report by the New America Foundation points out that as much as 40 percent of the $1 trillion in student debt outstanding was borrowed not for college, but to pay for grad school. And some 80% of of the debt incurred by students who finished their grad school programs in 2012 wasn’t for people going into medicine, law or business, but for less profitable professions, such as teaching.
Should future teachers be taking out massive loans to get their master’s of education degrees?
High-res

New Teachers Owe $429/month In Loans

A March 26, 2014 report by the New America Foundation points out that as much as 40 percent of the $1 trillion in student debt outstanding was borrowed not for college, but to pay for grad school. And some 80% of of the debt incurred by students who finished their grad school programs in 2012 wasn’t for people going into medicine, law or business, but for less profitable professions, such as teaching.

Should future teachers be taking out massive loans to get their master’s of education degrees?

These U.S. Colleges and Majors Are the Biggest Waste of Money

It gets worse. The self-reported earnings of art majors from Murray State are so low that after two decades, a typical high school grad will have out-earned them by nearly $200,000. Here are the degrees (i.e.: specific majors at specific schools) with the lowest 20-year net return, according to PayScale. They are all public schools: Bold names are for in-state students. 
High-res

These U.S. Colleges and Majors Are the Biggest Waste of Money

It gets worse. The self-reported earnings of art majors from Murray State are so low that after two decades, a typical high school grad will have out-earned them by nearly $200,000. Here are the degrees (i.e.: specific majors at specific schools) with the lowest 20-year net return, according to PayScale. They are all public schools: Bold names are for in-state students.

For Reformers: An Important Paper on Worker Compensation & Incentives

Most teachers pay for their own graduate school and ongoing professional training, and over 92 percent buy supplies for their students out of their own pockets. But over the past few years, we’ve seen over 60 percent of teachers working second jobs, dining with their children at food banks, and even selling their blood to make ends meet. Examples of such financial stress and strain can be found in every state in the country; quality teachers are walking away from the profession, and salaries are part of the reason they leave.

Is this the way we want any of our teachers to live? Is this what we think will lead students to higher levels of achievement?

Why teachers’ salaries should be doubled — now

Free Virtual Financial Event for Recent College Graduates

usagov:

If you’re new to the workforce or graduating college this spring, attend a free webinar sponsored by the Department of Labor where you’ll learn to plan for your financial future.

You’ll learn about tools for budgeting, student loan repayment options and how to make the most of employer-provided retirement and health benefits.   

Sign up now and join the event Friday at 1 p.m. ET.

But ultimately this is a housing policy problem masquerading as an education policy one. Normal people are mostly going to want their kids to go to a conveniently located school in or near their neighborhood. That’s just a question of practicality. But when you allow the zoning code to become a tool of economic exclusion, that turns neighborhood schooling into a system of exclusion.

The Myth of “Public” Schools

theatlantic:

Indisputable Evidence That Millennials Have It Worse Than Any Generation in 50 Years

Every generation likes to believe that it came of age at an especially trying moment in history. Millennials have the Great Recession to lament. Gen X had the dotcom bust. The Boomers had Vietnam. And the Silents had the early Cold War, complete with the not-so-silly threat of nuclear war. 
But at least when it comes to the job market, I think we can all agree by now that today’s young adults are deserving of at least a few extra pity points. And should there be any doubt, here’s a wonderful, one-chart demonstration of why from a new Pew report. At every education level, the 25- to 32-year-olds of 2013 confronted a higher unemployment rate than past generations did when they were stepping into the workforce. And keep in mind, that’s 2013—four years after the economy was supposed to have started mending.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

High-res

theatlantic:

Indisputable Evidence That Millennials Have It Worse Than Any Generation in 50 Years

Every generation likes to believe that it came of age at an especially trying moment in history. Millennials have the Great Recession to lament. Gen X had the dotcom bust. The Boomers had Vietnam. And the Silents had the early Cold War, complete with the not-so-silly threat of nuclear war. 

But at least when it comes to the job market, I think we can all agree by now that today’s young adults are deserving of at least a few extra pity points. And should there be any doubt, here’s a wonderful, one-chart demonstration of why from a new Pew report. At every education level, the 25- to 32-year-olds of 2013 confronted a higher unemployment rate than past generations did when they were stepping into the workforce. And keep in mind, that’s 2013—four years after the economy was supposed to have started mending.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]