data

Showing 27 posts tagged data

milwaukeestat:

A Rustbelt Makeover

Here’s some of your rough government data, Milwaukee. With a new cut and polish, you really shine.

This interactive map is built from a simple data series: the ages of 139,931 residential buildings in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The building data, maintained by the City of Milwaukee as part of a larger property database, has been hidden in plain sight for years.

Using only the age of a building plus the shape of the property that it sits upon, this map invites you to explore a city in a new way. Even a casual user can find quick insight in the data – perhaps noting new infill development in Milwaukee’s core (an indicator of urban renewal?). 

Or, seeing how past housing booms still shape the nature and distribution of the City’s existing housing stock.

Explore the patterns on your own block – click here for the complete, zoomable map. Learn more about the map’s data and inspiration here.

College Hopes & Worries

The Princeton Review conducts our annual College Hopes and Worries Survey of college applicants and parents of applicants to report on their expectations and experiences surrounding the college application process. Respondents are readers of our annual “Best Colleges” guidebook and users of our website.
Findings for our 2014 survey are based on responses from 14,150 people: 10,116 college applicants and 4,034 parents of applicants. They came from across America, representing all 50 states and DC. Some replied from countries abroad.
Some of our key findings are below. Also, check out our favorite words of advice from students and parents.

College Hopes & Worries

The Princeton Review conducts our annual College Hopes and Worries Survey of college applicants and parents of applicants to report on their expectations and experiences surrounding the college application process. Respondents are readers of our annual “Best Colleges” guidebook and users of our website.

Findings for our 2014 survey are based on responses from 14,150 people: 10,116 college applicants and 4,034 parents of applicants. They came from across America, representing all 50 states and DC. Some replied from countries abroad.

Some of our key findings are below. Also, check out our favorite words of advice from students and parents.

pewinternet:

We have a new report out today, a typology of Americans’ engagement with public libraries. It caps off the past three years of research the Pew Research Center has produced on the topic of public libraries’ changing role in Americans’ lives and communities.

Some of the main findings:

  • Americans’ library habits do not exist in a vacuum: People’s connection—or lack of connection—with public libraries is part of their broader information and social landscape. As a rule, people who have extensive economic, social, technological, and cultural resources are also more likely to use and value libraries as part of those networks. 
  • Life stage and special circumstances are linked to increased library use and higher engagement with information: Deeper connections with public libraries are often associated with key life moments such as having a child, seeking a job, being a student, and going through a situation in which research and data can help inform a decision.
  • Technology users are generally library users: A common narrative is that Americans are turning away from libraries because of newer technology, but the data shows that most highly-engaged library users are also big technology users. 

Check out the full report on our website! And if you’re curious about the basic data, this earlier report summarizes the measures we used to explore Americans’ engagement with public libraries.

The Web at 25

pewinternet celebrates:

Tomorrow marks the 25th anniversary of the World Wide Web. Throughout 2014, The Pew Research Center will mark this milestone with a series of reports and other activities related to the current state of online life and the potential future of the internet:

A couple weeks ago, we took a look back at more than 15 years of data on the rapid growth and overall impact of the internet. Today, we’re looking ahead to the future.

Follow our yearlong celebration of the Web’s 25th birthday, and join in on the conversation here, on Facebook, and on Twitter using #web25.

More soon!

pewinternet:

As we approach Valnetine’s/Singles’ Awareness Day, here’s some data to chew on:

  • 21% of couples have felt closer to their spouse/partner because of exchanges they had online or via text message.
  • 27% of internet users in a marriage or committed relationship have an email account that they share with their partner. 
  • 18% of online 18-29 year olds have argued with a partner about the amount of time one of them spent online (compared with 8% of all online couples).

Plus much more data candy for your pre-Valentine week. Enjoy!! http://pewrsr.ch/1csCijM

The Student and the Stopwatch

The debate over whether there is too much or too little testing occupies a prominent place in the policy discourse and in the media. However, the debate is largely ideological and devoid, ironically, of data on the amount of time students spend on testing. This report aims to shed light on the subject by answering the following questions:

How much time do students spend on state- and district-mandated tests in English language arts (ELA) and math at three key grade levels (kindergarten, third grade, and seventh grade)?
How does test time vary across 12 major urban districts in America?
How does test time vary between urban districts and the suburban communities that surround them?
What is the gap between teacher reports of test administration time and how district calendars report test administration time (see “Defining Test Time” inset)? And what explains the discrepancy?
High-res

The Student and the Stopwatch

The debate over whether there is too much or too little testing occupies a prominent place in the policy discourse and in the media. However, the debate is largely ideological and devoid, ironically, of data on the amount of time students spend on testing. This report aims to shed light on the subject by answering the following questions:

  1. How much time do students spend on state- and district-mandated tests in English language arts (ELA) and math at three key grade levels (kindergarten, third grade, and seventh grade)?
  2. How does test time vary across 12 major urban districts in America?
  3. How does test time vary between urban districts and the suburban communities that surround them?
  4. What is the gap between teacher reports of test administration time and how district calendars report test administration time (see “Defining Test Time” inset)? And what explains the discrepancy?
The classroom walkthrough and student achievement

Time spent coaching teachers—especially in math—was associated with better student outcomes. So was time spent evaluating teachers and curriculum.But informal classroom walkthroughs—the most common activity—were negatively associated with student achievement. This was especially true in high schools.In a follow-up analysis, the researchers evaluated these data in light of what the principals said about how teachers view classroom walkthroughs. The negative association with student achievement was most evident where principals believed that teachers did not view walkthroughs as opportunities for professional development.  (Other reasons for walkthroughs might be to ensure that a teacher is following a curriculum, or to be more visible to faculty.)
High-res

The classroom walkthrough and student achievement

Time spent coaching teachers—especially in math—was associated with better student outcomes. So was time spent evaluating teachers and curriculum.

But informal classroom walkthroughs—the most common activity—were negatively associated with student achievement. This was especially true in high schools.

In a follow-up analysis, the researchers evaluated these data in light of what the principals said about how teachers view classroom walkthroughs. The negative association with student achievement was most evident where principals believed that teachers did not view walkthroughs as opportunities for professional development.  (Other reasons for walkthroughs might be to ensure that a teacher is following a curriculum, or to be more visible to faculty.)

Can an algorithm ID high-school dropouts in first grade?

Data Reveal a Rise in College Degrees Among Americans

The number of Americans graduating from college has surged in recent years, sending the share with a college degree to a new high, federal data shows. 
 Last year, 33.5 percent of Americans ages 25 to 29 had at least a bachelor’s degree, compared with 24.7 percent in 1995, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. In 1975, the share was 21.9 percent. The number of two-year college degrees, master’s degrees and doctorates has also risen recently. 
 The increases appear to be driven both by a sharp rise in college enrollment and by an improvement among colleges in graduating students.

Data Reveal a Rise in College Degrees Among Americans

The number of Americans graduating from college has surged in recent years, sending the share with a college degree to a new high, federal data shows.

Last year, 33.5 percent of Americans ages 25 to 29 had at least a bachelor’s degree, compared with 24.7 percent in 1995, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. In 1975, the share was 21.9 percent. The number of two-year college degrees, master’s degrees and doctorates has also risen recently.

The increases appear to be driven both by a sharp rise in college enrollment and by an improvement among colleges in graduating students.

Two-thirds of College Students Think They’re Going to Change the World

Writer Peg Streep is writing a book about the Millennial generation and she routinely sprinkles great data into her posts at Psychology Today.  
Recently she linked to at study by Net Impact that surveyed currently-enrolled college students and college-graduates across three generations Millennials, Gen Xers, and Baby Boomers.  The questions focused on life goals and work priorities.  They found significant differences between students and college grads, as well as interesting generational differences.

Two-thirds of College Students Think They’re Going to Change the World

Writer Peg Streep is writing a book about the Millennial generation and she routinely sprinkles great data into her posts at Psychology Today.  

Recently she linked to at study by Net Impact that surveyed currently-enrolled college students and college-graduates across three generations Millennials, Gen Xers, and Baby Boomers.  The questions focused on life goals and work priorities.  They found significant differences between students and college grads, as well as interesting generational differences.