culture

Showing 115 posts tagged culture

npr untangles:

"A Plan To Untangle Our Digital Lives After We’re Gone" via Molly Roberts
Ancient peoples sent their dead to the grave with their prized possessions — precious stones, gilded weapons and terracotta armies. But unlike these treasures, our digital property won’t get buried with us. Our archived Facebook messages, old email chains and even Tinder exchanges will hover untouched in the online cloud when we die.
Image: iStockphoto
High-res

npr untangles:

"A Plan To Untangle Our Digital Lives After We’re Gone" via Molly Roberts

Ancient peoples sent their dead to the grave with their prized possessions — precious stones, gilded weapons and terracotta armies. But unlike these treasures, our digital property won’t get buried with us. Our archived Facebook messages, old email chains and even Tinder exchanges will hover untouched in the online cloud when we die.

Image: iStockphoto

When Beliefs and Facts Collide

The deeper problem is that citizens participate in public life precisely because they believe the issues at stake relate to their values and ideals, especially when political parties and other identity-based groups get involved – an outcome that is inevitable on high-profile issues. Those groups can help to mobilize the public and represent their interests, but they also help to produce the factual divisions that are one of the most toxic byproducts of our polarized era. Unfortunately, knowing what scientists think is ultimately no substitute for actually believing it.
High-res

When Beliefs and Facts Collide

The deeper problem is that citizens participate in public life precisely because they believe the issues at stake relate to their values and ideals, especially when political parties and other identity-based groups get involved – an outcome that is inevitable on high-profile issues. Those groups can help to mobilize the public and represent their interests, but they also help to produce the factual divisions that are one of the most toxic byproducts of our polarized era. Unfortunately, knowing what scientists think is ultimately no substitute for actually believing it.

Transforming school culture through mutual respect

A pivotal aspect of fostering mutual respect among teachers, students and staff is adhering to the following eight expectations, which I’ve witnessed fundamentally change the way schools function:
We will value one another as unique and special individuals. 
We will not laugh at or make fun of a person’s mistakes nor use sarcasm or putdowns. 
We will use good manners, saying “please,” “thank you” and “excuse me,” and we will allow others to go first. 
We will cheer each other to success. 
We will help one another whenever possible. 
We will recognize every effort and applaud it.
We will encourage each other to do our best.
We will practice virtuous living. 

image via flickr:CC | B.S. Wise High-res

Transforming school culture through mutual respect

A pivotal aspect of fostering mutual respect among teachers, students and staff is adhering to the following eight expectations, which I’ve witnessed fundamentally change the way schools function:

  1. We will value one another as unique and special individuals.
  2. We will not laugh at or make fun of a person’s mistakes nor use sarcasm or putdowns.
  3. We will use good manners, saying “please,” “thank you” and “excuse me,” and we will allow others to go first.
  4. We will cheer each other to success.
  5. We will help one another whenever possible.
  6. We will recognize every effort and applaud it.
  7. We will encourage each other to do our best.
  8. We will practice virtuous living.

image via flickr:CC | B.S. Wise

nprradiopictures shares:

With parents flooding their camera phones with hundreds of photos — from loose teeth to hissy fits to each step in the potty training process — how might the ubiquity of photos change childhood memories?
Maryanne Garry, a psychology professor at the Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand, is trying to figure that out. For years, she’s studied the effects of photography on our childhood memories.
"I think that the problem is that people are giving away being in the moment," she says.
Those parents at the park taking all those photos are actually paying less attention to the moment, she says, because they’re focused on the act of taking the photo.
Overexposed? Camera Phones Could Be Washing Out Our Memories
Photo Credit: Courtesy of Rebecca Woolf
High-res

nprradiopictures shares:

With parents flooding their camera phones with hundreds of photos — from loose teeth to hissy fits to each step in the potty training process — how might the ubiquity of photos change childhood memories?

Maryanne Garry, a psychology professor at the Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand, is trying to figure that out. For years, she’s studied the effects of photography on our childhood memories.

"I think that the problem is that people are giving away being in the moment," she says.

Those parents at the park taking all those photos are actually paying less attention to the moment, she says, because they’re focused on the act of taking the photo.

Overexposed? Camera Phones Could Be Washing Out Our Memories

Photo Credit: Courtesy of Rebecca Woolf

What a Teacher-Powered School Looks Like

Most public schools are traditionally run by principals and administrators, who defer to policies dictated by the state. But a group of 60 schools across the country is subverting the top-down system, putting teachers in full control of running their schools. 
It’s called the Teacher Powered Schools initiative, led by Education Evolving, and the goal is to seed a movement that will inspire other teachers in schools across the country to realize their potential as leaders. To that end, Education Evolving released a study [PDF]  in partnership with Center for Teaching Quality, which indicates that 91 percent of Americans believe teachers should have greater influence over decisions that affect student learning. What’s more, 81 percent of Americans indicate they trust teachers to make “schools run better.”
High-res

What a Teacher-Powered School Looks Like

Most public schools are traditionally run by principals and administrators, who defer to policies dictated by the state. But a group of 60 schools across the country is subverting the top-down system, putting teachers in full control of running their schools.

It’s called the Teacher Powered Schools initiative, led by Education Evolving, and the goal is to seed a movement that will inspire other teachers in schools across the country to realize their potential as leaders. To that end, Education Evolving released a study [PDF]  in partnership with Center for Teaching Quality, which indicates that 91 percent of Americans believe teachers should have greater influence over decisions that affect student learning. What’s more, 81 percent of Americans indicate they trust teachers to make “schools run better.”

For education to change, we need to refocus from what we teach to how we educate. You can teach kids whatever you want, but they will learn what they do.

Colleges and employers complain that schools are graduating students who can’t write. Will standards and tests help them to write better? No. It’s about ownership and practice. Kids need to write a lot, about something meaningful and get a lot of feedback. We learn what we do.

The Quality of Education is Visible in the Culture of a School

kenyatta:

everybodyatonce:

kenyatta spoke at tribecafilm institute’s Interactive day a couple of weeks back, where he explained the link between hip hop and internet memes, how Chinese fans of Sherlock are making new episodes by pairing old footage with fanfic, and how the future of filmmaking could look more like the officialmoamt project than traditional Hollywood.

The Audience Has An Audience: Kenyatta Cheese at 2014 TFI Interactive

For this year’s TFI Interactive opening keynote we were thrilled to have Kenyatta Cheese deliver a passionate presentation on how the audience has an audience. Which in essence means that with our obsession as a culture to tweet, share and blog anything and everything we are becoming a community of people changing the ways stories are being told through our own communal interests.

See an edited version of Cheese’s keynote above.

I said a thing

When the cost of collecting information on virtually every interaction falls to zero, the insights that we gain from our activity, in the context of the activity of others, will fundamentally change the way we relate to one another, to institutions, and with the future itself. We will become far more knowledgeable about the consequences of our actions; we will edit our behavior more quickly and intelligently.

Patrick Tucker, author of The Naked Future: What Happens In a World That Anticipates Your Every Move?, on what digital life will be like in 2025. (via pewinternet)

But what Office provides is a language for doing office things. You don’t go in front of an audience without a PowerPoint deck. Businesspeople “live” in Excel; its language (it actually is a crypto-programming language) has become the language of money and budgets. For people who do work with symbols and language to make a living, they organize their thoughts into the containers and systems that Office provide. Office is not so much a software product as much as a dialect that we all speak in order to work.

The Great Works of Software — Medium (via thisistheverge)

(via thisistheverge)