college

Showing 499 posts tagged college

‘Ivory Tower’ explores why American higher education is so pricey

The rise in U.S. college tuition is unsustainable. That’s the argument of a new television documentary, “Ivory Tower,” which tackles growing worries and critique over college costs and student debt. Jeffrey Brown talks to filmmaker Andrew Rossi about the origins of rising costs and financial competition among institutions, plus ideas about how to turn around the trend.

Door by Door, Colleges Install Systems for Online Control of Building Access

Spurred by a desire to better control who is moving in and out of campus facilities, colleges are adopting sophisticated online access systems at a steady clip. The systems, which support arrays of hard-wired and wireless locks, are being applied to interior doors, such as those in residence halls and labs, in addition to exterior doors. In some places they are being installed in concert with other security features, like video surveillance technology. The migration is such that traditional keys on college campuses could soon become as quaint as typewriters.
High-res

Door by Door, Colleges Install Systems for Online Control of Building Access

Spurred by a desire to better control who is moving in and out of campus facilities, colleges are adopting sophisticated online access systems at a steady clip. The systems, which support arrays of hard-wired and wireless locks, are being applied to interior doors, such as those in residence halls and labs, in addition to exterior doors. In some places they are being installed in concert with other security features, like video surveillance technology. The migration is such that traditional keys on college campuses could soon become as quaint as typewriters.

Obama’s Loan-Debt Relief Might Not Reach the Neediest Borrowers

In a fact sheet issued on Monday, the White House said the expansion would allow a fourth-year teacher who graduated with $26,500 in debt in 2009 and who makes $39,000 a year to reduce her monthly loan payments by $126 a month over a standard repayment period, saving her more than $1,500 a year.
That’s a significant amount, but it fails to take into account that the hypothetical teacher could already be paying off her debt under income-based or income-contingent repayment, and that her debt will balloon due to accumulating interest.

Obama’s Loan-Debt Relief Might Not Reach the Neediest Borrowers

In a fact sheet issued on Monday, the White House said the expansion would allow a fourth-year teacher who graduated with $26,500 in debt in 2009 and who makes $39,000 a year to reduce her monthly loan payments by $126 a month over a standard repayment period, saving her more than $1,500 a year.

That’s a significant amount, but it fails to take into account that the hypothetical teacher could already be paying off her debt under income-based or income-contingent repayment, and that her debt will balloon due to accumulating interest.

Will loan forgiveness offer long-term student debt solution?

The average person graduating from college in 2013 borrowed nearly $30,000 in student debt. To help Americans overburdened by their loans, President Obama signed a new executive order that expands on a 2010 law that capped federal loan repayments at 10 percent of borrowers’ monthly income.

BOLDING FOR EMPHASIS: “If the costs keep going up, what’s the point in just forgiving loans?” High-res

Will loan forgiveness offer long-term student debt solution?

The average person graduating from college in 2013 borrowed nearly $30,000 in student debt. To help Americans overburdened by their loans, President Obama signed a new executive order that expands on a 2010 law that capped federal loan repayments at 10 percent of borrowers’ monthly income.

BOLDING FOR EMPHASIS: “If the costs keep going up, what’s the point in just forgiving loans?”

Warning: The Literary Canon Could Make Students Squirm

Colleges across the country this spring have been wrestling with student requests for what are known as “trigger warnings,” explicit alerts that the material they are about to read or see in a classroom might upset them or, as some students assert, cause symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder in victims of rape or in war veterans.

The warnings, which have their ideological roots in feminist thought, have gained the most traction at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where the student government formally called for them. But there have been similar requests from students at Oberlin College, Rutgers University, the University of Michigan, George Washington University and other schools.

Harvard goes all in for online courses

Quietly, Harvard has built what amounts to an in-house production company to create massive open online courses, or MOOCs, high-end classes that some prestigious universities are offering for free to anyone in the world, generally without formal academic credit. Contrary to the popular image of online classes consisting largely of video from a camera planted at the back of the lecture hall, Harvard is increasingly using mini-documentaries, animation, and interactive software tools to offer a far richer product.
High-res

Harvard goes all in for online courses

Quietly, Harvard has built what amounts to an in-house production company to create massive open online courses, or MOOCs, high-end classes that some prestigious universities are offering for free to anyone in the world, generally without formal academic credit. Contrary to the popular image of online classes consisting largely of video from a camera planted at the back of the lecture hall, Harvard is increasingly using mini-documentaries, animation, and interactive software tools to offer a far richer product.

Is College Worth It? Clearly, New Data Say

A new set of income statistics answers those questions quite clearly: Yes, college is worth it, and it’s not even close. For all the struggles that many young college graduates face, a four-year degree has probably never been more valuable.
The pay gap between college graduates and everyone else reached a record high last year, according to the new data, which is based on an analysis of Labor Department statistics by the Economic Policy Institute in Washington. Americans with four-year college degrees made 98 percent more an hour on average in 2013 than people without a degree. That’s up from 89 percent five years earlier, 85 percent a decade earlier and 64 percent in the early 1980s.

Is College Worth It? Clearly, New Data Say

A new set of income statistics answers those questions quite clearly: Yes, college is worth it, and it’s not even close. For all the struggles that many young college graduates face, a four-year degree has probably never been more valuable.

The pay gap between college graduates and everyone else reached a record high last year, according to the new data, which is based on an analysis of Labor Department statistics by the Economic Policy Institute in Washington. Americans with four-year college degrees made 98 percent more an hour on average in 2013 than people without a degree. That’s up from 89 percent five years earlier, 85 percent a decade earlier and 64 percent in the early 1980s.

Wisconsin survey suggests college grads want ability to to get around without a car

A new survey suggests most Wisconsin college students want the ability to get around without a car, and not having that option could be one factor in them leaving the state after they graduate.
For the last decade, Wisconsin has been experiencing a “brain drain,” with more college graduates leaving the state than staying, notes the WISPIRG Foundation, which promotes good government and aims to protect consumers.
While transportation is only one piece of the equation, millennials are leading the decline in vehicle miles traveled in favor of biking, walking and taking transit, other research has found. Young people increasingly tell surveys that they want a lifestyle that isn’t dependent on driving and are drawn to the vibrancy and convenience of more walkable communities.

image via flickr:CC | didbygraham High-res

Wisconsin survey suggests college grads want ability to to get around without a car

A new survey suggests most Wisconsin college students want the ability to get around without a car, and not having that option could be one factor in them leaving the state after they graduate.

For the last decade, Wisconsin has been experiencing a “brain drain,” with more college graduates leaving the state than staying, notes the WISPIRG Foundation, which promotes good government and aims to protect consumers.

While transportation is only one piece of the equation, millennials are leading the decline in vehicle miles traveled in favor of biking, walking and taking transit, other research has found. Young people increasingly tell surveys that they want a lifestyle that isn’t dependent on driving and are drawn to the vibrancy and convenience of more walkable communities.

image via flickr:CC | didbygraham

'R U on Track for College?' Texting a New Strategy

As educators look for ways to keep high school seniors on track for college and to avoid the “summer melt” that leads some astray in the months after they graduate, a new strategy is gaining ground: texting.
This year, West Virginia launched a pilot program that alerts students about deadlines for financial aid, registration, and student orientation, among other matters, with personalized messages on their mobile phones. The texting initiative targets students from low-income families—especially those set to become the first in their families to attend college.
High-res

'R U on Track for College?' Texting a New Strategy

As educators look for ways to keep high school seniors on track for college and to avoid the “summer melt” that leads some astray in the months after they graduate, a new strategy is gaining ground: texting.

This year, West Virginia launched a pilot program that alerts students about deadlines for financial aid, registration, and student orientation, among other matters, with personalized messages on their mobile phones. The texting initiative targets students from low-income families—especially those set to become the first in their families to attend college.