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Showing 50 posts tagged audio

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Allen Jackson recalls teaching about segregation

Voices From Inside a School With No Racial Majority

Valley Point MS

As of last school year, white students no longer make up the majority of students at Valley Point Middle School in Dalton, Ga.—a small Southern town near the Tennessee border. This shift reflects one that is taking place nationwide for the first time this school year, as projections show U.S. schools becoming ‘majority minority’ for the first time this school year. Although there is a sizable population of Latinos at Valley Point, there is currently no racial majority. Hear what school administrators, teachers, and students at the middle school have to say about the school’s diverse population.

60 Songs to Keep Your Class Jammin' by @JohnHardison1

I really like this idea as a weekend reflection - where am I at in the school year and what is the title/songs in my soundtrack - something to chew on! To be inspired you can listen to his 60 song list, titled The Heart as My Conductor.

Nature Sound Map - Listen to the Sounds of Nature All Over the World

Nature Sound Map provides a wonderful way to explore the soundscape of the natural world.
In science courses the sound map offers a nice way for students to hear the sounds of animals that they’re learning about in different regions of the world. In some cases the sound recordings combined with Street View imagery could give students a more complete picture of what it is like to be at ground level in a place.

image via rmbyrne High-res

Nature Sound Map - Listen to the Sounds of Nature All Over the World

Nature Sound Map provides a wonderful way to explore the soundscape of the natural world.

In science courses the sound map offers a nice way for students to hear the sounds of animals that they’re learning about in different regions of the world. In some cases the sound recordings combined with Street View imagery could give students a more complete picture of what it is like to be at ground level in a place.

image via rmbyrne

What does it take to succeed? Philadelphia program teaches kids 'grit'

What helps children succeed? The question has long puzzled parents and educators alike. IQ and test scores have garnered a lot of attention, but a new school of thought introduces a different concept: grit.  In other words, dedication, the ability to stick things out, to cope with setbacks.

A Philadelphia program aims to instill these qualities in young people — through regular mentoring and adventurous trips.

howstuffworks:

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Tech Stuff podcast: Was Ada Lovelace the first computer programmer?

Happy birthday to Ada Lovelace (aka Augusta Ada Byron) — born this day, December 10th, in 1815. A gifted mathematician and daughter of the infamous Lord Byron, Ada met one Charles Babbage at a party when she was 17 and became fascinated by the mathematician’s Analytical Engine — a kind of mechanical computer that could make complex calculations, including multiplication and division. From that chance meeting grew a strong, dynamic relationship. Ada discussed Babbage’s ideas with him and offered her own insights. In 1843, she published an influential set of notes describing Babbage’s Analytical Engine. Ada also added in some sage predictions, speculating that Babbage’s mechanical computers might one day “act upon other things besides numbers” and “compose elaborate and scientific pieces of music of any degree of complexity …”

Listen in on Tech Stuff’s classic podcast to learn lots more.

[Image by Colin Adams, based on the original A. E. Chaton portrait, for the Ada Initiative.]

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Thanksgiving Cobbler

Artist

Carlotta Calmesee

Album

Wisconsin Life

wilife stirs up:

Thanksgiving Cobbler:

A lot of people will be in the kitchen today, getting ready for Thanksgiving dinner. In Madison, Carlotta Calmese is baking one of her family’s traditional desserts — peach cobbler. Producer Cynthia Woodland brought us her story.

Photo by hthrd.

Beyond Texts and Tweets, Young People Still Love to Read Books

In what may come as a pleasant surprise to people who fear the Facebook generation has given up on reading — or, at least, reading anything longer than 140 characters — a new report from the Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project reveals the prominent role of books, libraries and technology in the lives of young readers, ages 16 to 29. 
“We found that about 8 in 10 Americans under the age of 30 have read a book in the past year. And that’s compared to about 7 in 10 adults in general, American adults.”
“We heard from e-book readers in general [that] they don’t want e-books to replace print books.”
“We found that [younger people are] very interested in the idea of preloaded e-readers — being able to check out an e-reader at a library that already has some popular titles on it.”

photo via flickr:CC | North Shore Country Day School

Beyond Texts and Tweets, Young People Still Love to Read Books

In what may come as a pleasant surprise to people who fear the Facebook generation has given up on reading — or, at least, reading anything longer than 140 characters — a new report from the Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project reveals the prominent role of books, libraries and technology in the lives of young readers, ages 16 to 29.

  • “We found that about 8 in 10 Americans under the age of 30 have read a book in the past year. And that’s compared to about 7 in 10 adults in general, American adults.”
  • “We heard from e-book readers in general [that] they don’t want e-books to replace print books.”
  • “We found that [younger people are] very interested in the idea of preloaded e-readers — being able to check out an e-reader at a library that already has some popular titles on it.”

photo via flickr:CC | North Shore Country Day School

How Teachers Can Avoid The October Blues

HEADLEE: But for the teachers who were there, new teachers or not, who are experiencing what you call the disillusionment phase as we speak, who are listening to your voice now, what do you say to the teacher crying in his or her car after school today?

ELDEN: First of all, you have to hang in there because you have to know that it’s that time of year. And also, it helps to know I think, the great teachers of the future know they’re not great yet. They want so badly to be everything that these students need them to be, but at the same time they are very hard on themselves when they fall short. So if you have those moments where you’re wondering - like what I wondered was, you know, how did these teachers get - these kids get stuck with a teacher like me, that can actually be a sign of kind of a point in your growth. It’s a low point that it still points in becoming a teacher that you hope to be.

Grit, Luck and Money

More people are going to college than ever before, but a lot of them aren’t finishing. Low-income students, in particular, struggle to get to graduation. Only 9 percent complete a bachelor’s degree by age 24. Why are so many students quitting, and what leads a few to beat the odds and make it through?

In this documentary, American RadioWorks correspondent Emily Hanford introduces us to young people trying to break into the middle class, teachers trying to increase their chances and researchers investigating the nature of persistence.

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Bastille Day

Artist

Rush

Album

Caress of Steel

For they marched up to Bastille Day
La guillotine claimed her bloody prize
Hear the echoes of the centuries
Power isn’t all that money buys.

When Rachel Smith’s older sister was a second-semester high school senior, she and her classmates started to “senior slide.” They had been going to school for 13 years, graduation was on its way, and heck, it was warm outside. So when one of her teachers found her students unprepared for class, and announced: “I know everyone has been giving up on you for your entire life, but I’m not going to give up on you,” the students in the class were offended.

They were being lazy; not hopeless.

According to Rachel, who is the chief poet at Kenwood Academy’s Epic Sound slam poetry team, that kind of thing happens a lot when privileged young people come to teach in what she calls “inner city” schools. So Rachel decided to write a poem about it.