BYOD

Showing 30 posts tagged BYOD

5 Apps for Making Movies on Mobile Devices

Here are the free ones:

  1. iMotion HD (iOS: Free, Upgrade Available)
  2. Magisto Video Editor & Maker (Android: Free)
  3. Andromedia Video Editor (Android: Free)

And pay:

  1. iMovie (iOS: $4.99)
  2. PicPlayPost (iOS: $1.99)

BYOD: Key to Active 3 Screen Day, Not An Equity Solution

If we are really wanting to help these kids that might be coming from poor situations, we need to rethink the practices that we already have in our schools to provide for them. For example, many schools have “computer labs” where we take kids once or twice a week, to do something with technology or allow them to type out an essay for us. This is not a good use of technology anymore and we should know better now. Technology should be at the point of instruction and be as accessible in learning as a pencil; it shouldn’t be an event. How many pencil labs do you have in your school?

Inequity and BYOD


The infographic highlights findings from the mobile learning report, Living & Learning with Mobile Devices, released today from Grunwald & Associates and the Learning First Alliance. According to the report more than 50 percent of parents believe that schools should make more use of mobile devices in education.

Embiggen here
I’m really surprised by the data collected in this survey (2,392 parents) which isn’t unfortunately broken down into age categories. Two items of note:
83% said their school does not require use of personal electronic devices and 72% said it was not allowed at all.
Parents are concerned about theft of personal devices (81%), but 45% still plan to buy or have a personal mobile device purchased for their student. 32% of parents surveyed think schools should require this.
High-res

The infographic highlights findings from the mobile learning report, Living & Learning with Mobile Devices, released today from Grunwald & Associates and the Learning First Alliance. According to the report more than 50 percent of parents believe that schools should make more use of mobile devices in education.

Embiggen here

I’m really surprised by the data collected in this survey (2,392 parents) which isn’t unfortunately broken down into age categories. Two items of note:

  • 83% said their school does not require use of personal electronic devices and 72% said it was not allowed at all.
  • Parents are concerned about theft of personal devices (81%), but 45% still plan to buy or have a personal mobile device purchased for their student. 32% of parents surveyed think schools should require this.

It’s #FF on Twitter - if you’re not following on twitter today is a great day to start; she’s an amazing resource!

I have been traveling throughout Slovenia and Croatia for the past month training teachers in integrating Bring Your Own Technology (BYOT) effectively with their classes. I was very fortunate to have the opportunity to teach various classes of teens throughout the two countries to show teachers how BYOT works. For the days I was teaching the students, these schools lifted their policies and allowed the students to use their devices as a way of getting technology in the schools. The teachers wanted to see BYOT in action, especially with students who were never allowed to use their mobile devices or other technologies before for learning. BYOT was a great option because many of these students would not usually be able to learn with various technologies in schools if they didn’t bring them in.

BYOT: The hidden messages

Many of those who say BYOT doesn’t work argue that schools have to provide all students with equal technology. We can’t wait around for that. Students need to be able to use technology to problem solve and think critically.

Many also argue that it will harm students who cannot afford expensive technology. Kids aren’t blind. They already realize through clothing, tennis shoes, etc. they come from various economic backgrounds. We need to educate and have open discussions about these real world issues and not decide to block access.

I have worked in various economic situations worldwide with mobile devices and the students learn they can be creative, learning can be engaging, and their devices even if just a cellphone, digital camera or cheap tablet gives them limitless possibilities to learn daily.

@ShellTerrell is an amazing person to follow on Twitter if you aren’t already.

Schools Set Boundaries for Use of Students’ Digital Devices

"We’re caught in this perfect storm between our human comfort level with the rate of change we’d prefer, and the high-speed rate of change that is being foisted on us by evolutions in technology," says Lewis. "And this is only going to get increasingly difficult for us as these evolutions happen more and more swiftly."

The article is largely about BYOD initiatives, and how a few schools have had issues keeping up their AUPs (Acceptable Use Policy) and problems with discipline. Overall, their 4 tips to BYOD policy are good:
Clear rules
Systematic rollout
Coverage AND capacity
Teach digital citizenship
photo via flickr:CC | UBC Library

Schools Set Boundaries for Use of Students’ Digital Devices

"We’re caught in this perfect storm between our human comfort level with the rate of change we’d prefer, and the high-speed rate of change that is being foisted on us by evolutions in technology," says Lewis. "And this is only going to get increasingly difficult for us as these evolutions happen more and more swiftly."

The article is largely about BYOD initiatives, and how a few schools have had issues keeping up their AUPs (Acceptable Use Policy) and problems with discipline. Overall, their 4 tips to BYOD policy are good:

  1. Clear rules
  2. Systematic rollout
  3. Coverage AND capacity
  4. Teach digital citizenship

photo via flickr:CC | UBC Library

Earlier this week I was having dinner with some fellow educational technologists. The conversation took the inevitable turn to discussing 1:1 philosophy. 1:1 is most typically defined as the ratio of one student to one device where that device is provided by the school. During our discussion, the question was posed as “1:1, Chromebooks or iPads?” While I am a fan of both Chromebooks and iPads, I was troubled by this conversation. Not, of course, because I am opposed to the student use of technology, but because I am starting to realize that 1:1 is a parallel philosophy to “one size fits all.”

I’ve been saying this since 2008-09 - as you may know I’m a proponent of BYOD; because I believe in personal learning environments, I don’t think the school can dictate what the best learning device is across the board, and I continue to encourage confidence and competence with technology (not any specific device). Are their challenges with equity? YES. Can we overcome them? YES! Can we model the post-secondary and workplace environment? Absolutely.