CBT in Grade School Can Lower Kids’ Anxiety

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) has been shown to greatly reduce anxiety levels in schoolchildren ages nine to 10 years old, according to new research from Oxford University. Researchers believe that this therapy would benefit all children, regardless of their anxiety levels.
During CBT, students learned how to identify and handle their emotions and replace their anxious thoughts with more constructive thought patterns. They also developed their problem-solving skills so they could better deal with anxiety-provoking situations.

image via flickr:CC | Holtsman High-res

CBT in Grade School Can Lower Kids’ Anxiety

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) has been shown to greatly reduce anxiety levels in schoolchildren ages nine to 10 years old, according to new research from Oxford University. Researchers believe that this therapy would benefit all children, regardless of their anxiety levels.

During CBT, students learned how to identify and handle their emotions and replace their anxious thoughts with more constructive thought patterns. They also developed their problem-solving skills so they could better deal with anxiety-provoking situations.

image via flickr:CC | Holtsman

Most with college STEM degrees go to work in other fields

People with bachelor’s degrees in science, technology, engineering and math are more likely than other college graduates to have a job, but most of them don’t work in STEM occupations, according to a U.S. Census Bureau report released Thursday. 
Nearly 75 percent of all holders of bachelor’s degrees in STEM disciplines don’t have jobs in STEM occupations, according to a survey that reached 3.5 million homes, said Liana Christin Landivar, a sociologist with the Census Bureau. The bureau’s American Community Survey is the largest household survey in the nation. 
 About half of those who have degrees related to engineering, computers, math and statistics do get a STEM job, the survey found.

Check out the Census Bureau’s interactive tool High-res

Most with college STEM degrees go to work in other fields

People with bachelor’s degrees in science, technology, engineering and math are more likely than other college graduates to have a job, but most of them don’t work in STEM occupations, according to a U.S. Census Bureau report released Thursday.

Nearly 75 percent of all holders of bachelor’s degrees in STEM disciplines don’t have jobs in STEM occupations, according to a survey that reached 3.5 million homes, said Liana Christin Landivar, a sociologist with the Census Bureau. The bureau’s American Community Survey is the largest household survey in the nation.

About half of those who have degrees related to engineering, computers, math and statistics do get a STEM job, the survey found.

Check out the Census Bureau’s interactive tool

Nearly 75 Percent of [Highered] Faculty Incorporated Technology into their Teaching in the Past Year

When it comes to technology in the classroom, phrases like “faculty resistance” and the importance of getting “faculty buy-in” are tossed around with great frequency. But is that perception still valid? Are all instructors so set in their ways, skeptical of anything new, and fearful of deviating from what they’ve done that it’s nearly impossible to get them to try something new?
High-res

Nearly 75 Percent of [Highered] Faculty Incorporated Technology into their Teaching in the Past Year

When it comes to technology in the classroom, phrases like “faculty resistance” and the importance of getting “faculty buy-in” are tossed around with great frequency. But is that perception still valid? Are all instructors so set in their ways, skeptical of anything new, and fearful of deviating from what they’ve done that it’s nearly impossible to get them to try something new?

Community College Students Struggle Most with Student Loan Debt

Students who attend community college are defaulting on their loans more often than those who attend a four-year school. With 70% of students borrowing less than $6,000, this may come as a surprise.  However, low graduation rates may explain why so many cannot repay these small amounts.
Only 7% of young-adult families hold $50,000 or more in debt related to education.  In contrast, 58% of the same households have less than $10,000 in this type of debt.  These are the graduates who have a difficult time finding a job and paying back their loans.Ryan Lane for US News suggests three points to help students from defaulting on their loans.
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Community College Students Struggle Most with Student Loan Debt

Students who attend community college are defaulting on their loans more often than those who attend a four-year school. With 70% of students borrowing less than $6,000, this may come as a surprise.  However, low graduation rates may explain why so many cannot repay these small amounts.

Only 7% of young-adult families hold $50,000 or more in debt related to education.  In contrast, 58% of the same households have less than $10,000 in this type of debt.  These are the graduates who have a difficult time finding a job and paying back their loans.

Ryan Lane for US News suggests three points to help students from defaulting on their loans.

Common Core: Putting Students on Paths to 21st-Century Success

This downloadable, shareable, and printable poster has two parts. On the left side, you’ll see six classroom scenes that show a necessary 21st-century skill that teachers are developing through their instruction with the help of the standards. All six of these skills lead to 21st-century success—and can be found embedded in various lessons and activities at every grade level.
The right side of the poster shows where these classroom paths lead: to three top skills that employers say students will need to be college and career ready. (Research shows that college and career readiness is the #1 topic of interest to parents when discussing the standards.) So this poster shows exactly what parents want to see—how teachers are preparing students for 21st-century success. 
High-res

Common Core: Putting Students on Paths to 21st-Century Success

This downloadable, shareable, and printable poster has two parts. On the left side, you’ll see six classroom scenes that show a necessary 21st-century skill that teachers are developing through their instruction with the help of the standards. All six of these skills lead to 21st-century success—and can be found embedded in various lessons and activities at every grade level.

The right side of the poster shows where these classroom paths lead: to three top skills that employers say students will need to be college and career ready. (Research shows that college and career readiness is the #1 topic of interest to parents when discussing the standards.) So this poster shows exactly what parents want to see—how teachers are preparing students for 21st-century success.

Motivation: Reflecting On What To Do When It’s Not There

That’s Lesson Number One that I wish I knew as a student: Sometimes you aren’t going to be motivated but do it anyway — such a simple lesson that has propelled me into action. Maybe motivation is overrated. Maybe in order to be successful we don’t really need a whole lot of it.
 Really it’s just a shift in perspective…

image via flickr:CC | bastique High-res

Motivation: Reflecting On What To Do When It’s Not There

That’s Lesson Number One that I wish I knew as a student: Sometimes you aren’t going to be motivated but do it anyway — such a simple lesson that has propelled me into action. Maybe motivation is overrated. Maybe in order to be successful we don’t really need a whole lot of it.

Really it’s just a shift in perspective

image via flickr:CC | bastique

Before Buying Technology, Asking 'Why?'

"I get probably five or six calls a day from different principals or superintendents saying, ‘I bought all this technology, now what?’" said Allison Powell, vice president for new learning models at the International Association for K-12 Online Learning, or iNACOL. "They’re buying the technology without thinking through what their specific learning goals and outcomes are, and technology might not be the right tool for that.”

Mastering the Teaching Game

Coach Groeneveld’s eight principles are the essence of powerful teaching. The teacher walks into a classroom and accepts the reality that the only way to reach students is to know them as individuals. After that, by unfolding layers to access students’ core, the shared goal setting ensues. The teacher knows the content well and can teach “mechanics” in a way that compels attention. But the instructor also realizes that until the young student thinks like a successful student, the mechanics will fall short. And so the educator — the learning architect — assiduously teaches each individual to take responsibility for his or her own game or learning plan. Each success empowers the next success. And these successes belong to the child. Teaching itself is reward enough.

image via flickr:CC | jacqui.brown33 High-res

Mastering the Teaching Game

Coach Groeneveld’s eight principles are the essence of powerful teaching. The teacher walks into a classroom and accepts the reality that the only way to reach students is to know them as individuals. After that, by unfolding layers to access students’ core, the shared goal setting ensues. The teacher knows the content well and can teach “mechanics” in a way that compels attention. But the instructor also realizes that until the young student thinks like a successful student, the mechanics will fall short. And so the educator — the learning architect — assiduously teaches each individual to take responsibility for his or her own game or learning plan. Each success empowers the next success. And these successes belong to the child. Teaching itself is reward enough.

image via flickr:CC | jacqui.brown33

Separate and Unequal

Sixty years after the Supreme Court declared separate schools for black and white children unconstitutional, school segregation is making a comeback. What’s behind the growing racial divide in American schools — and what’s the legacy of Brown v. Board of Education? In part two, Omarina’s Story, FRONTLINE revisits a student who made the most of her “middle school moment”. 

55 minutes and worth every one. High-res

Separate and Unequal

Sixty years after the Supreme Court declared separate schools for black and white children unconstitutional, school segregation is making a comeback. What’s behind the growing racial divide in American schools — and what’s the legacy of Brown v. Board of Education? In part two, Omarina’s Story, FRONTLINE revisits a student who made the most of her “middle school moment”.

55 minutes and worth every one.