What happens when public-school students are promised a college education

LeGower and Walsh also looked at property values within a subset of eight cities where housing data was available. Within three years of a promise announcement there, they found, housing prices in the neighborhoods around the best-performing public schools increased by 7 to 12 percent (or as much as about $20,500). This suggests that families who could afford to were paying a premium to access the scholarships.
Why would that matter for the overall impact of these programs? “This could have the effect,” LeGower and Walsh write, “of contributing to further inequality in educational outcomes if the high-income households attracted by Promise programs are exclusively attending already high-quality schools.”
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What happens when public-school students are promised a college education

LeGower and Walsh also looked at property values within a subset of eight cities where housing data was available. Within three years of a promise announcement there, they found, housing prices in the neighborhoods around the best-performing public schools increased by 7 to 12 percent (or as much as about $20,500). This suggests that families who could afford to were paying a premium to access the scholarships.

Why would that matter for the overall impact of these programs? “This could have the effect,” LeGower and Walsh write, “of contributing to further inequality in educational outcomes if the high-income households attracted by Promise programs are exclusively attending already high-quality schools.”

Tales From the Classroom: The Importance of Time Management 

During my first two years of teaching, it seemed as if I had no personal life. The demands of learning the craft required so much of my time and energy that I would often work 12 to 15 hours a day, with little energy or free time left over. I felt stressed and personally unfulfilled. I started to question whether teaching was a viable career for me.
 This year—my third—I decided that things would be different.

Read how…  
image via flickr:CC | Flotographic Arts High-res

Tales From the Classroom: The Importance of Time Management

During my first two years of teaching, it seemed as if I had no personal life. The demands of learning the craft required so much of my time and energy that I would often work 12 to 15 hours a day, with little energy or free time left over. I felt stressed and personally unfulfilled. I started to question whether teaching was a viable career for me.

This year—my third—I decided that things would be different.

Read how…  

image via flickr:CC | Flotographic Arts

Study: 2 In 5 Americans Earning Degrees After High School

America may have a shot at rejoining the world’s most educated nations by 2025, according to a report released Monday by the Lumina Foundation. 
The Indianapolis-based foundation’s annual report finds some encouraging data to counter the familiar story of a nation that is famed for its colleges and universities but trails many other countries when it comes to the percentage of people with a degree beyond high school.
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Study: 2 In 5 Americans Earning Degrees After High School

America may have a shot at rejoining the world’s most educated nations by 2025, according to a report released Monday by the Lumina Foundation.

The Indianapolis-based foundation’s annual report finds some encouraging data to counter the familiar story of a nation that is famed for its colleges and universities but trails many other countries when it comes to the percentage of people with a degree beyond high school.

Competency Based Teacher Preparation

As calls for improving achievement and increasing personalization of student learning echo across the nation, new professional development learning models are creating the potential for personalized preparation pathways for teachers. 
Teacher preparation and professional learning should evolve similarly in order to offer teacher control over time, place, path and/or pace; balanced goals; meaningful integration and competency-based progression.
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Competency Based Teacher Preparation

As calls for improving achievement and increasing personalization of student learning echo across the nation, new professional development learning models are creating the potential for personalized preparation pathways for teachers.

Teacher preparation and professional learning should evolve similarly in order to offer teacher control over time, place, path and/or pace; balanced goals; meaningful integration and competency-based progression.

theatlantic:

What the Shift to Mobile Means for Blind News Consumers

If a website is designed haphazardly, it doesn’t only look out of control. The user experience can be just as messy for someone who can’t see.
"News apps are just completely frustrating," said Christopher Danielsen, spokesman for the National Federation of the Blind. ”Blind people, the way we deal with this, is we share information about what apps tend to work, so I don’t tend to download something unless I have a pretty good sense that I’m going to be able to deal with it.” 
The problem with much of the web—and, in particular, its newsier corners—is that it’s designed without consideration for people who aren’t navigating by sight. In many cases, the busier a website looks, the harder it is for people who use tools like audio screen-readers to get where they want to go, or even figure out where to go in the first place.
But Danielsen says design for accessibility is getting much better, albeit largely by accident. “The mobile world is taking over where the web used to be dominant,” he told me. “For blind people as well as for sighted people in many cases, that’s a good thing.”
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

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theatlantic:

What the Shift to Mobile Means for Blind News Consumers

If a website is designed haphazardly, it doesn’t only look out of control. The user experience can be just as messy for someone who can’t see.

"News apps are just completely frustrating," said Christopher Danielsen, spokesman for the National Federation of the Blind. ”Blind people, the way we deal with this, is we share information about what apps tend to work, so I don’t tend to download something unless I have a pretty good sense that I’m going to be able to deal with it.” 

The problem with much of the web—and, in particular, its newsier corners—is that it’s designed without consideration for people who aren’t navigating by sight. In many cases, the busier a website looks, the harder it is for people who use tools like audio screen-readers to get where they want to go, or even figure out where to go in the first place.

But Danielsen says design for accessibility is getting much better, albeit largely by accident. “The mobile world is taking over where the web used to be dominant,” he told me. “For blind people as well as for sighted people in many cases, that’s a good thing.”

Read more. [Image: Reuters]