7 Sites for Helping Students Learn About Wildlife

Earth Day is coming up next week on April 22nd. This week before Earth Day is a good time for lessons about the wildlife that can benefit from the conservation efforts promoted through Earth Day. 

Arkive.org
Polar Bears International
WWF Together
Explore.org
Wild Earth 
WWF Wildfinder
NOAA’s Games Planet Arcade 
image via flickr:CC | Cowgirl111 High-res

7 Sites for Helping Students Learn About Wildlife

Earth Day is coming up next week on April 22nd. This week before Earth Day is a good time for lessons about the wildlife that can benefit from the conservation efforts promoted through Earth Day.

  1. Arkive.org
  2. Polar Bears International
  3. WWF Together
  4. Explore.org
  5. Wild Earth
  6. WWF Wildfinder
  7. NOAA’s Games Planet Arcade

image via flickr:CC | Cowgirl111

Students don’t need a ‘voice.’ Here’s what they really need.

When they say, “Let’s give students a voice,” they mean, “let’s give them a seat at school board meetings.” 
That’s not what they need. They need a lot more. We need to give them a pen and a microphone and a hammer and a shovel and a chalkboard. We need to give them a classroom and an audience and blank sheet that says “curriculum” at the top. We need to give them a budget and a building.

image via flickr:CC | mikefisher821 High-res

Students don’t need a ‘voice.’ Here’s what they really need.

When they say, “Let’s give students a voice,” they mean, “let’s give them a seat at school board meetings.”

That’s not what they need. They need a lot more. We need to give them a pen and a microphone and a hammer and a shovel and a chalkboard. We need to give them a classroom and an audience and blank sheet that says “curriculum” at the top. We need to give them a budget and a building.

image via flickr:CC | mikefisher821

Relationship Problems Can Damage Teen Girls’ Mental Health

College Board releases preview of new SAT exam questions

The revisions, announced in broad terms in March, were fleshed out in detail Wednesday as the College Board released draft sample questions and a new framework for the 88-year-old test.

One sample question asks about this sentence: “The coming decades will likely see more intense clustering of jobs, innovation, and productivity in a smaller number of bigger cities and city-regions.”

Students are then asked whether “intense” most nearly means: (A) emotional; (B) concentrated; (C) brilliant; or (D) determined. The answer is B.

Other sample questions ask for analysis of a complex congressional speech on impeachment and for interpretation of data from a passage and informational graphic about turtle migration.

Unlike a rusting highway bridge, digital infrastructure does not betray the effects of age. And, unlike roads and bridges, large portions of the software infrastructure of the Internet are built and maintained by volunteers, who get little reward when their code works well but are blamed, and sometimes savagely derided, when it fails. To some degree, this is beginning to change: venture-capital firms have made substantial investments in code-infrastructure projects, like GitHub and the Node Package Manager. But money and support still tend to flow to the newest and sexiest projects, while boring but essential elements like OpenSSL limp along as volunteer efforts. It’s easy to take open-source software for granted, and to forget that the Internet we use every day depends in part on the freely donated work of thousands of programmers. If open-source software is at the heart of the Internet, then we might need to examine it from time to time to make sure it’s not bleeding.

The Internet’s Telltale Heartbleed : The New Yorker (via new-aesthetic)

(via emergentfutures)