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"A Plan To Untangle Our Digital Lives After We’re Gone" via Molly Roberts
Ancient peoples sent their dead to the grave with their prized possessions — precious stones, gilded weapons and terracotta armies. But unlike these treasures, our digital property won’t get buried with us. Our archived Facebook messages, old email chains and even Tinder exchanges will hover untouched in the online cloud when we die.
Image: iStockphoto
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npr untangles:

"A Plan To Untangle Our Digital Lives After We’re Gone" via Molly Roberts

Ancient peoples sent their dead to the grave with their prized possessions — precious stones, gilded weapons and terracotta armies. But unlike these treasures, our digital property won’t get buried with us. Our archived Facebook messages, old email chains and even Tinder exchanges will hover untouched in the online cloud when we die.

Image: iStockphoto

You’re probably not getting enough sleep, but you might not be as far off the mark as you think. Most sleep experts would offer that aiming for between seven to nine hours of snooze time a night is optimal for feeling refreshed and productive the next day. In a new report, however … researchers are closing in on what may just be that magic nightly number—and it’s not nine hours, or even eight as once believed… it’s seven hours of sleep.

The usual caveats apply, and these findings should be taken with a grain of salt. But the results are interesting—especially if you’re the kind of person who struggles with sluggishness throughout the day.

"The lowest mortality and morbidity is with seven hours," [says] Shawn Youngstedt, a professor in the College of Nursing and Health Innovation at Arizona State University Phoenix… "Eight hours or more has consistently been shown to be hazardous."

Intriguing new study on the optimal amount of sleep. But that grain of salt can’t be overstated given the wide variation of “chronotypes” and internal time.

Also see the science of what actually happens while you sleep and how it affects your every waking moment.

(via explore-blog)

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thisistheverge:

This may be the greatest invention in the history of water balloons If you’ve ever had the pleasure of participating in a water balloon fight, you will concur that the most frustrating part of battle is reloading. You think you’ve got an uninflated balloon securely attached to the end of a garden hose, and then as soon as you turn on the water, *snap*, the balloon comes flying off. Or maybe you don’t even get that far — the balloon breaks as you’re stretching it on. Or you get it all filled up, and then you can’t tie it and it drops and breaks on the ground. Now some ambitious inventor has come up with a solution to all those problems: a device that lets you easily fill up 37 water balloons at once, and 100 in less than a minute.

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thisistheverge:

This may be the greatest invention in the history of water balloons
If you’ve ever had the pleasure of participating in a water balloon fight, you will concur that the most frustrating part of battle is reloading. You think you’ve got an uninflated balloon securely attached to the end of a garden hose, and then as soon as you turn on the water, *snap*, the balloon comes flying off. Or maybe you don’t even get that far — the balloon breaks as you’re stretching it on. Or you get it all filled up, and then you can’t tie it and it drops and breaks on the ground. Now some ambitious inventor has come up with a solution to all those problems: a device that lets you easily fill up 37 water balloons at once, and 100 in less than a minute.

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Examining Knowledge Beliefs to Motivate Student Learning